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LED flickers, because it is a light emitting diode (a solid state lamp). The Lamp will only light when its power cycle is "on". A dimmer in essence, SLOWS DOWN THE CYCLE TIME, therefore slowing down the time frame in which a cycle is repeated. So, the lamp appears to flicker, because it is turning ON and OFF!


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I'll tell you a secret: they flicker all the time You just don't notice it, because the higher the power, the longer they stay ON and quicker switch on/off. As you dim down them, their flickering becomes more even and noticeable. What about randomness ? Well, it flickers randomly to minimize harmonics disturbance. Wait, what's that ? It's topic for another ...


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Electronic devices like LED compatible dimmers that chop up the AC power into tiny chunks tend to generate electronic noise that consists of harmonics of the line frequency but at very high frequencies. These signals will bounce around between other devices nearby through the wiring. This can cause interactions between those devices which would be more ...


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Check that your LED bulbs are compatible with dimmers, and check that your dimmers are compatible with LEDs. If their respective packages don't say, then they probably aren't compatible and you will have problems. Even if everything claims to be compatible, you still might have issues. In that case, the best you can do is experiment with different brands ...


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LEDs on AC Power Don't Like to be Dimmed. Period. (LEDs on DC can actually be dimmed quite easily - just look at an older battery powered LED device (like handheld computer games from the 1980s) and you can see the LEDs dim when the battery is low.) But most AC powered LED lights - whether complete fixtures or Edison bulb incandescent replacements - have a ...


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The specifications of the LED lights you have say they will dim down to 10% without any flicker or buzzing. Some lights don't go down that far, and some will go even further. Based on the manual for your dimmer switch, there is an adjustment to change the low end of the dimming range: I would assume the switch would be factory set to work with most lights,...


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20 AWG is rated for 5 amps, so it's good for taking any strip as far as you ought to. I prefer 22 AWG or 0.25 mm2, and stranded wire. The reason is, if the wires are any thicker, they will tend to "wag the dog", pulling the LED strip out of shape/position and potentially tearing off the solder pad. The "0.75" on the output terminals is surely not a ...


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Regarding running costs, at a price of 11.5 cents a kilowatt hour a 1 Watt bulb left on all year would cost $1.00. So assuming you only have the light on when its dark, say an average 8 hours a day throughout the year then removing the 3 LED bulbs would save you about $5.


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Yes, that will cut energy use in half, though the type of bulb (LED, CFL, incandescent, one that's not invented yet) does not matter. Of course, you also get half the light. A bulb which is removed does not use any electricity whether or not the fixture is switched on (James Thurber's Grandmother notwithstanding, for the literarily inclined.)


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If you want to fight over legalese, you'll be thrilled to know that the courts have ruled in favor of the Oxford comma. The instructions probably predate the court ruling, but after the Court date, the lights should be totally OK in recessed luminaires which are not totally enclosed. Just be aware this has been appealed. If the Supreme Court reverses, your ...


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To properly dim an LED, you need the following info: What type of LED you're trying to dim (integrated IC or 'bare') What type of dimmer you need to use What type of controller you need/want LED strip (or integrated driver IC) LED strips usually have a driver built-in and operate at 12 or 24V. They are easily powered by a regular (Constant Voltage) power ...


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Since your product has actually cleared all the EU safety standards and then some (TUV follows UL's standards generally), I recommend keeping your safe product all-safe. That precludes using the cheap Asian junkstream coming out of Alibaba and blasting onto AliExpress, eBay, Amazon, banggood and other turdmeister outlets. You want drivers which either ...


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This is common with sensors that are not listed for use with LED’s The sensor is drawing a tiny amount of power to power the electronics, this s just enough to cause a glow and sometimes flashing. You have 2 options use higher wattage lamps like you have tried to prove the sensor was working OR find an LED compatible sensor. I use motion sensors that work ...


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Yes, that could be the cause depending on the electronics. If you want to waste power? The better solution is to use another sensor. The blinking, however, might also be caused by an induced current within the wiring. I had the case where I had a ceiling LED light would blink randomly when turned off, another one was always slightly on even when the ...


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As the comments above indicated, the problem was a dimmer switch that I didn't know existed.


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