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13

I have not seen patches hold up on copper. What I find best is to cut it at the hole and sweat a coupler on. It must be dry when you do the soldering or it will leak.


5

In a comment you said, AC unit is outside. Assuming you're talking about a whole-house AC unit, what's outside is the condenser. There's another half to the system - the evaporator. it sits inside your "furnace" and cools the air forced over it by the circulation fan in your furnace, which in turn circulates through your ducts and cools your house. AC ...


4

Well those stupid infomercials would say to "wrap it in flex tape," don't do that, or wrap it in rags. (Fiber fix would be better then both, but please fix it properly.) That looks like a copper compression fitting. As such just tightening it probably will not stop the leak. There is a small chance that will work, it may have just worked its way loose over ...


4

I've had some success with this stuff - it's basically a fiber tape soaked in something like gorilla glue. But I'd only consider it a temporary repair. the right way is to cut the pipe and solder in a coupler.


3

You have a roof leak that is dripping either directly onto the fan assembly or onto or into the vent tubing. Probably the leak is around a roof penetration, but we had one due to a defect in the roof decking right above the fan. Water dripped onto the fan assembly, through it, and into the bathroom. EDIT Another possibility is condensation of water in the ...


3

What type of pipe is this Just plain 15mm plastic pipe for domestic water supplies. The elbow fitting looks like John Guest Speedfit, so the pipe may have been selected to match but I believe everything is pretty compatible nowadays. See How to remove this plastic pipe elbow (scroll down for Speedfit) should the elbows be replaced, and if so with what / ...


3

Looks similar to mine. "Price Pfister, the Pfabulous Pfaucet with the Pfunny name". Web search for Pfister Style 974-491 should yield multiple purchasing options.


3

The threaded connection of the basket to the tail piece should have some Teflon tape wrapped around the threads before it is threaded together. It needs to be taken apart and the tape installed correctly. It should be the responsibility of the person who did the work incorrectly.


3

No. That would be like sealing the bottom side of a sponge--moisture will travel through it to emerge in other areas. You can probably accomplish the repair even in winter. A water hose will quickly melt snow and ice from the areas you need to access, or use scaffolding and other hardware to work over it.


3

I've never seen or heard of this being done. Water in a bathroon should never make it to the studs or supports in any significant supply such that it actually creates or promotes damage or rot. The appropriate solution is to remove/stop the water source that caused the damage before it gets that far/in the first place. The flooring choices is most ...


3

Do you have a single handle faucet? Most single handle faucets /showers will leak over from cold to hot or from hot to cold during use (if they aren't set at the absolute max/min setting). To prevent this try turning off the local hot water valve at each single handle faucet/shower. Do you have mixing valve somewhere, like for a bidet system? That would ...


2

Take a 3x5 index card or similar size flexible but not to thin piece of paper and bend it into a curve so that it will slide into the opening under the stem, angle it slightly so water will run out towards you. You may have to trim the length and width depending of the depth of the wall and the opening. It only needs to curve up slightly, you are creating ...


2

If this roof in question is standing seam, then there shouldn't be any leaks because the fasteners are all concealed. Are you sure it isn't an exposed fastener roof? That's typically the type of roof that leaks when fasteners work their way out over time. For exposed fastener roofs, they make gasketed "rescue screws" specifically designed to be fastened ...


2

You could lay a coating of solder on the pipe, preferably a silver bearing alloy, but you would have to drain that pipe and have "it bone dry". You could clean the copper, drop the boiler pressure to near zero so the drip stops and lay on a coat of fast dry epoxy. These are 2 ideas, hope this helps Also, Home DEpot sells a 1/2" copper compression X ...


2

When a 2-year-old shower is leaking, something is definitely wrong. Call the builder, and tell him to fix it. Yes, there's supposed to be waterproofing behind the tiles. The tiles and grout by themselves won't be enough to keep the water out of the wall. I don't know if there are precise rules for how high the waterproofing should go, but I would think at ...


2

What I've done in the past is to saw a coupler in half lengthwise, use a file to remove the center ridge (unless you can find a "repair coupler" that lacks the ridge), thoroughly clean and flux the pipe and inside of the coupler, tie half of the coupler on with bare copper wire (after cleaning/fluxing it), then (after making sure the pipe is perfectly dry ...


2

A common option in the UK (dunno if they are available in other countries) for fixing damaged copper pipes is a compression repair coupler. The coupling has compression fittings on both ends only one of which has a depth stop, so after cutting the pipe you can slide the fitting onto one pipe and then slide it back onto the other with minimal movement of the ...


2

I understand that you want to remove the damaged material but you also don't want to scrape so aggressively that you end up removing a large amount of undamaged material that could have stayed in place, and it is difficult to know where to draw the line. A good rule of thumb is that if the material can be removed using light pressure with just your fingers ...


2

2 hp is WAY too big for that system. That looks like a 90 sq ft cartridge filter (C-900) which can handle up to 90 GPM when clean but that is extreme. 25-30 PSI is probably not out of the "normal" range for 2 hp. You don't say how many gallons the pool is but that should determine the size of the pump. You get far more efficiency and better filtration with a ...


2

This tray that you speak of is there to collect water made when the frig goes into defrost. The tray is supposed to be large enough to collect all of the water without overflowing. The water is supposed to evaporate faster than it is generated. If the tray is cracked, that is a problem. If the tray does not lay flat, also a problem. If your local ...


2

You have two possible leak causes, so you need to separate them to figure out which one it is. I assume the line to the old ice maker is still running behind the fridge. Rather than just shut it off under the sink, disconnect the line under the sink and put a tray under the valve to catch any drips. The next day, check the tray for drips. If the valve ...


2

Remove the supply flex and make sure there is not an old rubber cone washer squished up into the fill valve, leftover from the old supply line. Inspect the new line while it is unattached to ensure the washer/gasket/o-ring is in place and undamaged. Reattach using minimal torque, hand-tight should be enough (with maybe just a bit extra on it with pliers......


2

Your plan to use your circular saw with the table set to depth is good. Even if you were to cut tight to the wall and tub, you still aren't getting all the damage, so a short distance out is fine. Personally I'm not a fan of joints right at walls and tubs anyway. I'd rather have an offset. When you do the repair, float lumber under the remaining damage, ...


2

This is an argument that seems to never end. I work for several hotels and in every single room the toilet is caulked. It just plain looks nicer and it helps to stabilize the toilet. Some say that it will hide a leak but that makes limited sense. If a toilet leaks at the base, it's usually related to the flange leaking. Now, if the toilet gets cracked for ...


2

In the end - the issues was as I expected. I saturated the area with my garden hose and observed where the water was coming in - which was mostly through the wire penetration. I dug down to below the wire and removed the wire. I scrapped away the old sealing that had failed, and then used an angle grinder with a flap wheel to bring the hole to bare metal on ...


2

You should be able to CHECK that there's no leak on the house side by simply shutting off the valve (that should be there, but might not be if your plumber was clueless, I suppose) between the pressure tank and the rest of the house. If you do that and the behavior continues, yes, you have a problem on the well side - check valve not working, cracked pipe, ...


2

1. Some water might be tolerable in a minimally finished old basement. In St Louis, a lot of houses would sometimes get some water in the basement. Some of them a fair bit. If this is going to destroy the berber rug in your man cave that is one thing. If it is going to make a small puddle that is another. If a little water entering the basement of your ...


2

I have a number of faucets of a similar style and you will want to check and replace the seat. In the image below, the seat is the little threaded part at the bottom. It's placed behind the cartridge (contrary to how it's shown in the image) You'll need a seat wrench to get it out: Likely you will find that there are notches in it. Get a replacement and ...


2

That is a Kohler "canister style" flush valve. First, carefully remove the "rim-clean/bowl-fill" water supply hose (the little black hose that runs from your fill valve to the flush valve. Also, remove the chain that attaches the trip lever to the flush valve. To get at the gasket in question (which is very likely, but not 100% certainly, your problem) ...


2

Both of those screws loosen counterclockwise. Spray some WD-40 on them and let it soak in for a bit. There is a washer or "o" ring at the base of the spout or in the base of the valve. hit that big nut with some WD-40 and turn it counterclockwise too loosen. you might have to loosen the supply nuts to get an adjustable wrench in there, a pair of ...


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