Hot answers tagged

31

You can cut the bolts off with a mini hacksaw. The rubber washers inside the tank are shot, and that's what's causing your leak. You can fix it for $10. Turn off water (I think you're already here). Flush and sop up the remaining water in the tank with a sponge (or use a shop vac if you have one). Cut off the bolts and remove them. Replace with new bolts ...


12

Ultimately, the "correct" way to fix this is a new bolt kit, with stainless bolts and new sealing washers. Most hardware stores or big box stores will carry bolt kits for all major brands of toilets, plus generic kits. The kits include new bolts, nuts, washers, and rubber sealing washers, which are the part that's likely causing your leak. Write down the ...


10

Billy Mays here for Flex Seal.


8

I would use Oatey “hot” glue it sets faster than regular but cost a bit more , only get a small can as it evaporates faster also. You can see the label most standard solvents require an hour or longer depending on the diameter , but hot glue is ready in as short as 10 minutes. Primers also help but hot glue doesn’t need primer or the orange stuff I use doesn’...


8

That plug is where I add biocides to prevent mold buildup in the pan, mold is the main cause of obstructions , if the pan is starting to drip you probably have some cleaning to do as the water should not build up in the pan and a small layer has probably raised the water level because it is acting like a dam. I have had customers ask how can mold grow in ...


8

I think the other answers make it clear what's going on, but I wanted to add some more details. That red cap is probably not meant to be water tight, so when the water level in the pan is high, it will drip. What is common in my area is that there is a "main" drain line, usually plumbed with PVC pipe (not that flext tubing you have) that will drain ...


6

Rather than using silicone as suggested by Michael Karas, I would use something like Fernox LS-X which is actually designed as a leak sealant. In particular, it does not need to be applied to a dry substrate. If you empty the cistern and apply from the inside, you don't even need to wait for it to set.


6

That looks like just a thin plastic filler plug for a second drain hole. If you pull it out or unscrew it there's probably threads under it. You can buy a pipe plug and some thread sealant at a local hardware store to plug it properly.


5

In a comment you said, AC unit is outside. Assuming you're talking about a whole-house AC unit, what's outside is the condenser. There's another half to the system - the evaporator. it sits inside your "furnace" and cools the air forced over it by the circulation fan in your furnace, which in turn circulates through your ducts and cools your house. AC ...


5

If you are looking to use a product under water then you can try a wet patch for roofs. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Henry-10-1-oz-209XR-Elastomeric-Sealant-HE209004/100001308


5

PVC isn't connected with adhesive, it's solvent welded. The "cement" is actually a solvent which dissolves the surface of pipe and fitting, fusing them into one piece as it evaporates. The real trick is getting the stuff together before that happens, because you only have a handful of seconds to work with. Proper planning and preparation help. If you've ...


4

Do you have a single handle faucet? Most single handle faucets /showers will leak over from cold to hot or from hot to cold during use (if they aren't set at the absolute max/min setting). To prevent this try turning off the local hot water valve at each single handle faucet/shower. Do you have mixing valve somewhere, like for a bidet system? That would ...


4

A sealant like silicone would work as a temporary fix but there are some things to consider: The silicone would need to be spread fully across the bolt heads and onto the adjacent porcelain on the inside of the water closet (tank). Thick layer over the rusty bolt heads would be a must. The whole area where you apply the silicone will have to be clean and ...


4

If you're looking for a somewhat quick fix without much work, you can take a look at some plumbing epoxy putty such as this. This is a two part epoxy putty that you mix together and then wrap the leaking connection. I would clean the connection very well and sand the area to rough it up before starting. This will allow you to make the repair without ever ...


4

Those two openings are for draining the pan that catches the condensate off the coil. One is usually a bit higher than the other. Make sure drain line is attached to the lowest hole. If it is correct or or there is no difference I’d look for some blockage in the drain line. A dirty filter can also cause draining problems by increasing the internal vacuum ...


3

You have a roof leak that is dripping either directly onto the fan assembly or onto or into the vent tubing. Probably the leak is around a roof penetration, but we had one due to a defect in the roof decking right above the fan. Water dripped onto the fan assembly, through it, and into the bathroom. EDIT Another possibility is condensation of water in the ...


3

What type of pipe is this Just plain 15mm plastic pipe for domestic water supplies. The elbow fitting looks like John Guest Speedfit, so the pipe may have been selected to match but I believe everything is pretty compatible nowadays. See How to remove this plastic pipe elbow (scroll down for Speedfit) should the elbows be replaced, and if so with what / ...


3

Looks similar to mine. "Price Pfister, the Pfabulous Pfaucet with the Pfunny name". Web search for Pfister Style 974-491 should yield multiple purchasing options.


3

The threaded connection of the basket to the tail piece should have some Teflon tape wrapped around the threads before it is threaded together. It needs to be taken apart and the tape installed correctly. It should be the responsibility of the person who did the work incorrectly.


3

I'm really surprised nobody has mentioned the truly superior product here: plumber's putty. It's easy to remove, doesn't crack, and you can mold it around your bolt, where the rubber gasket used to go. The one place you can't use it would be a custom gasket that covers all the bolts (some newer toilets use them). In those cases, the gaskets perform a ...


3

You might not need PVC glue at all. A viable alternative to gluing would be a screw-tight compression coupling like this one. The catch with, say, a Sharkbite is you need square-on pressure to push the connectors in. This is problematic for repairing existing in-ground pipes (you can't exactly "pull" the pipe). The compression coupler solves that by ...


2

2 hp is WAY too big for that system. That looks like a 90 sq ft cartridge filter (C-900) which can handle up to 90 GPM when clean but that is extreme. 25-30 PSI is probably not out of the "normal" range for 2 hp. You don't say how many gallons the pool is but that should determine the size of the pump. You get far more efficiency and better filtration with a ...


2

Remove the supply flex and make sure there is not an old rubber cone washer squished up into the fill valve, leftover from the old supply line. Inspect the new line while it is unattached to ensure the washer/gasket/o-ring is in place and undamaged. Reattach using minimal torque, hand-tight should be enough (with maybe just a bit extra on it with pliers......


2

You have two possible leak causes, so you need to separate them to figure out which one it is. I assume the line to the old ice maker is still running behind the fridge. Rather than just shut it off under the sink, disconnect the line under the sink and put a tray under the valve to catch any drips. The next day, check the tray for drips. If the valve ...


2

In the end - the issues was as I expected. I saturated the area with my garden hose and observed where the water was coming in - which was mostly through the wire penetration. I dug down to below the wire and removed the wire. I scrapped away the old sealing that had failed, and then used an angle grinder with a flap wheel to bring the hole to bare metal on ...


2

This is an argument that seems to never end. I work for several hotels and in every single room the toilet is caulked. It just plain looks nicer and it helps to stabilize the toilet. Some say that it will hide a leak but that makes limited sense. If a toilet leaks at the base, it's usually related to the flange leaking. Now, if the toilet gets cracked for ...


2

Your plan to use your circular saw with the table set to depth is good. Even if you were to cut tight to the wall and tub, you still aren't getting all the damage, so a short distance out is fine. Personally I'm not a fan of joints right at walls and tubs anyway. I'd rather have an offset. When you do the repair, float lumber under the remaining damage, ...


2

You should be able to CHECK that there's no leak on the house side by simply shutting off the valve (that should be there, but might not be if your plumber was clueless, I suppose) between the pressure tank and the rest of the house. If you do that and the behavior continues, yes, you have a problem on the well side - check valve not working, cracked pipe, ...


2

This tray that you speak of is there to collect water made when the frig goes into defrost. The tray is supposed to be large enough to collect all of the water without overflowing. The water is supposed to evaporate faster than it is generated. If the tray is cracked, that is a problem. If the tray does not lay flat, also a problem. If your local ...


2

1. Some water might be tolerable in a minimally finished old basement. In St Louis, a lot of houses would sometimes get some water in the basement. Some of them a fair bit. If this is going to destroy the berber rug in your man cave that is one thing. If it is going to make a small puddle that is another. If a little water entering the basement of your ...


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