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31

You can cut the bolts off with a mini hacksaw. The rubber washers inside the tank are shot, and that's what's causing your leak. You can fix it for $10. Turn off water (I think you're already here). Flush and sop up the remaining water in the tank with a sponge (or use a shop vac if you have one). Cut off the bolts and remove them. Replace with new bolts ...


12

Ultimately, the "correct" way to fix this is a new bolt kit, with stainless bolts and new sealing washers. Most hardware stores or big box stores will carry bolt kits for all major brands of toilets, plus generic kits. The kits include new bolts, nuts, washers, and rubber sealing washers, which are the part that's likely causing your leak. Write down the ...


10

Billy Mays here for Flex Seal.


8

I think the other answers make it clear what's going on, but I wanted to add some more details. That red cap is probably not meant to be water tight, so when the water level in the pan is high, it will drip. What is common in my area is that there is a "main" drain line, usually plumbed with PVC pipe (not that flext tubing you have) that will drain ...


8

That plug is where I add biocides to prevent mold buildup in the pan, mold is the main cause of obstructions , if the pan is starting to drip you probably have some cleaning to do as the water should not build up in the pan and a small layer has probably raised the water level because it is acting like a dam. I have had customers ask how can mold grow in ...


8

I would use Oatey “hot” glue it sets faster than regular but cost a bit more , only get a small can as it evaporates faster also. You can see the label most standard solvents require an hour or longer depending on the diameter , but hot glue is ready in as short as 10 minutes. Primers also help but hot glue doesn’t need primer or the orange stuff I use doesn’...


6

Rather than using silicone as suggested by Michael Karas, I would use something like Fernox LS-X which is actually designed as a leak sealant. In particular, it does not need to be applied to a dry substrate. If you empty the cistern and apply from the inside, you don't even need to wait for it to set.


6

That looks like just a thin plastic filler plug for a second drain hole. If you pull it out or unscrew it there's probably threads under it. You can buy a pipe plug and some thread sealant at a local hardware store to plug it properly.


5

PVC isn't connected with adhesive, it's solvent welded. The "cement" is actually a solvent which dissolves the surface of pipe and fitting, fusing them into one piece as it evaporates. The real trick is getting the stuff together before that happens, because you only have a handful of seconds to work with. Proper planning and preparation help. If you've ...


5

If you are looking to use a product under water then you can try a wet patch for roofs. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Henry-10-1-oz-209XR-Elastomeric-Sealant-HE209004/100001308


4

If you're looking for a somewhat quick fix without much work, you can take a look at some plumbing epoxy putty such as this. This is a two part epoxy putty that you mix together and then wrap the leaking connection. I would clean the connection very well and sand the area to rough it up before starting. This will allow you to make the repair without ever ...


4

Those two openings are for draining the pan that catches the condensate off the coil. One is usually a bit higher than the other. Make sure drain line is attached to the lowest hole. If it is correct or or there is no difference I’d look for some blockage in the drain line. A dirty filter can also cause draining problems by increasing the internal vacuum ...


4

A sealant like silicone would work as a temporary fix but there are some things to consider: The silicone would need to be spread fully across the bolt heads and onto the adjacent porcelain on the inside of the water closet (tank). Thick layer over the rusty bolt heads would be a must. The whole area where you apply the silicone will have to be clean and ...


3

I'm really surprised nobody has mentioned the truly superior product here: plumber's putty. It's easy to remove, doesn't crack, and you can mold it around your bolt, where the rubber gasket used to go. The one place you can't use it would be a custom gasket that covers all the bolts (some newer toilets use them). In those cases, the gaskets perform a ...


3

You might not need PVC glue at all. A viable alternative to gluing would be a screw-tight compression coupling like this one. The catch with, say, a Sharkbite is you need square-on pressure to push the connectors in. This is problematic for repairing existing in-ground pipes (you can't exactly "pull" the pipe). The compression coupler solves that by ...


2

Everything Michael said is a must. I would think about using a few PVC caps for the patch. See photo below. You'd have to rough up the outside, inside and bottom with some sandpaper so the silicone adheres to the caps. Apply a ring of caulk around the bolt areas and also around the bottom of the caps. Then just press the caps over the bolts and let it fully ...


2

You should confirm the leak is in the plumbing. The pool company can do a pressure test (it's easy to do diy too, just need some fittings. Just be careful not to put too much pressure in the system.) Anyway, another way to confirm where the leak is to plug the return and skimmer lines. If the water stops falling, then you have your answer. If the leak is ...


2

That blue water service line could be PEX, but it also could be HDPE. If it's HDPE then it might be CTS (copper tube size) or IPS (iron pipe size). Based on the shade of blue I'm leaning toward HDPE, but it's hard to tell in a photo. Use a small mirror to inspect the full circumference of the pipe -- it may have something printed on it indicating the type. ...


1

If there is a push-on fitting that meets your needs, such as from Sharkbite or one of their competitors, you can have the whole job done in less than one minute. A photo of your plumbing would clarify, but I'd be surprised if there isn't a push on fitting that would work. Please don't expect anything you apply externally to work properly. Either use real ...


1

As far as I can tell that coupling is called a PVC Compression Coupling and according to the product page it should only be used to connect PVC and/or galvanized piping. In the Q&A section of the product page the manufacturer states: This is designed for connecting piping and repairs of PVC and galvanized pipe. It is not directly compatible with Pex. ...


1

The main penetration of the tub that is below the waterline is the sump assembly. The sump assembly is comprised of the pump, heater, sensors, and other components. There is a main sump assembly seal that prevents water from the tub from leaking out. That would be the first thing I would inspect. To further diagnose I would disconnect the unit and remove it,...


1

I find that replacing the whole cartridge rather than the o-rings usually works well, specifically for leaks out the opening of the tap. For leaks around the base, the o-rings need to be replaced.


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