Hot answers tagged

14

You can buy bathtub splash guards such as the ones found here. You should be able to find similar ones at your local hardware store. Most versions install in seconds, using easy peel and stick adhesive backings. No tools, no mess, and usually no waiting for caulks and/or glues to dry.


13

I have not seen patches hold up on copper. What I find best is to cut it at the hole and sweat a coupler on. It must be dry when you do the soldering or it will leak.


10

For inexperienced DIYers; or any body not really comfortable with plumbing in general, the easiest option is to replace the whole faucet. While the faucet may be serviceable, stuck screws/bolts, proprietary disassembly steps, and difficulty finding replacement parts, make this a frustrating job for beginners. The new faucet should come with instructions ...


10

The proper name for it is a self piercing saddle valve. The valves are bad for many reasons, including the fact that they often clog and no longer allow water through the line, and they leak. If you need a valve there to supply something like an ice maker or humidifier, then I'd cut the pipe, add a T, and put a proper quarter turn valve on the line. To ...


10

This is a tough job and it may be worth it for you to call a plumber as there are numerous complications you might encounter. However, you will have to learn somehow: 1) Forget about the "higher pitch dripping sound" for now. The leak at the toilet base is big trouble and your efforts should be focused there. 2) shut off the water supply, flush the toilet, ...


10

Turn the water off, and remove it. Those things are rubbish, and always leak eventually. If you need a valve there, cut out the damaged section of pipe, and install a proper tee and valve. If you don't need it, cut out the damaged section of pipe and install a coupling. If you're not an expert solderer, They make push-fit fittings (SharkBite® is the well ...


9

I had this problem in my last house, but rather than Jaydles' fancy putty, I just grabbed a cheap tube of silicone caulk and ran a bead around the outside of the tub wall. A couple seconds to squeegee it off after the shower, and things stayed nice and dry. If you're not great at drawing straight lines, use good-quality masking tape to get those perfect ...


8

This is the easiest way I know of to find them: 1) Dry off all pipes with a paper towel 2) Run the water, garbage disposal, spray hose, etc. - anything you think contributes to the leak 3) Take a dry piece of paper towel and wipe each joint and pipe. Inspect the paper towel after each one. When you find a spot thats wet, you've probably found your leak.


8

This a common problem with old multi-turn valves. The first thing to try is to tighten the packing nut on the shut-off shaft. Sometimes this will compress the packing enough to stop the leak. Trying to fix this packing while the water is on is very risky. Even with all the water outlets in the house turned on, you will still be seeing 50 to 70 PSI coming in ...


8

You can use a few methods. I would recommend using fibre glass firstly and then maybe some sort of epoxy /putty. FIRST AND MOST IMPORTANT You will need to clean the areas that you are going to work with. And i do not mean like wipe with a tissue. I mean take some sand paper and lightly scratch the surfaces so it scores it to give better grip to the ...


8

Brass Hose Cap (~$1.50 @ Home Depot and Lowes). You may also be able to find some with tethers (for those of us that constantly lose things like this) .


7

If it's the toilet itself, you'll see water on the floor around the toilet -- water will leak from the union of the tank (backrest) and the bowl. Make sure that the tank is attached tightly to the bowl (bolts are under the joint) and that it cannot rock. If it's the seal or the plumbing beneath it, you will see water flowing from underneath. You'll need to ...


7

Clogged line There could be a clog in the lines feeding some of the sprinklers, or clogged up sprinkler heads. Remove all the sprinkler heads (the procedure will vary based on the type of heads). Inspect and clean the heads. Turn the system on. If you don't notice any dirt or gunk coming out, and the pressure does not increase in the low flowing outlets. ...


7

I would examine why the pipe was corroded. Was it a galvanic failure caused by joining copper/brass to galvanized steel? Remove the fitting entirely and inspect/clean the threading. If the threading is damaged then replace the valve... In fact, you could replace the valves anyway if they're old and you've got the wall off. Many modern valves have ...


7

Oh, wow. I'm sorry, but your roof is probably bad. If you can get the money you paid four years ago back (doubtful), I would, but you probably need to get that entire mess torn off all the way down to the decking, and probably quite a bit of the decking near the edges of the roof too. You can tell because the shingles look "lumpy" and have a rolling look to ...


7

If you are on a municipal system and have pressure that high, you quite likely already have a pressure reducing valve (PRV) installed near your water meter. The International Plumbing Code requires PRVs on any water supply over 80psi. If this is the case, your PRV may just need adjustment. As they age, the spring regulating the device's operation can soften. ...


7

Take some duct tape and seal it around the seam between the frame/door from outside. Then get some proper weather stripping and adjust the door frame when it's not in the middle of a hurricane.


7

Concrete itself is not waterproof, in fact, it's more like a sponge, so concrete alone is never used to create an impermeable surface. You haven't provided much info - is the roof flat, sloped? What is already up there? There are tons of different waterproofing methods available. Going under the assumption that it was properly waterproofed at some point, ...


7

You need to replace the diverter, which in your case is also part of the spout. This should be a relatively easy and cheap replacement. Usually the spout is held on with a set screw located in the bottom - you loosen the screen and the spout will twist/pull off. Replace it with a new spout and diverter, tighten the screw and enjoy!


7

Epoxy is unlikely to make a lasting repair. What you need is a pipe repair clamp, which is a stainless steel band with a rubber gasket inside it - the "in place repair" type have a beveled overlapping edge so the clamp can be opened up and slipped onto the pipe, then clamped in place to seal the leak. They look similar to the "hubless coupling" clamps but ...


7

I assume your leak is something along the lines of the following: Even though the hole may look small on the outside, it is like a tooth cavity, the corrosion on the inside is much larger. In most cases, even a small leak is an indication that the entire pipe needs to be replaced.


6

If the drip becomes a flood, it's not the cost of the water you should be concerned with; it's the water damage. You say the leak seems to be coming from the valve itself, and your reasoning makes sense; if the toilet's dry it means the valve is turned off, so it's probably not any fitting beyond the valve stem. This means that the shutoff valve gasket, or ...


6

Make sure the gasket that the flapper rests on is perfectly clean. Any grit or sediment on it can prevent the flapper from making a good seal. Check the chain that runs from the handle assembly to the flapper. If it's taut when the flapper is down, it may be holding the flapper slightly away from the gasket, again preventing a good seal. If that doesn't ...


6

You have probably damaged the seal between your toilet and the flange. This seal is usually formed by a wax ring that forms closely to the flange and toilet base when the toilet is installed. If you've moved the toilet significantly, you may have opened up a hole in this seal where water can leak when your toilet is draining. It's sometimes possible to ...


6

Check for any debris around the flapper and its hinges. It is the flapper moving back to the original closed position that puts the handle back in the correct position, not the handle that moves the flapper (when closing, obviously when you flush the handle opens the flapper). You have the right idea with adjusting the chain to ensure there is always slack....


6

Roofer would be the initial guess. One has to guess that because the leak is seen during a storm. Even though the leak may be coming in around the vent stack pipe for the bathroom it is still a roofers skill to properly seal a leak like that.


6

It's a self-piercing saddle valve like this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FB76LXrYKsU . If you're familiar with electronics, it works a lot like the so-called "vampire tap" for coax cable. Regardless, it's a quick and easy solution in the short-term, but they tend not to last. Because they are cheap, they tend to fail easily, and because they are ...


6

That flapper needs to be replaced completely - good news! It's a very cheap part. Turn the water off to the toilet, remove the flapper, and take it with you to any home parts store of your choice. Pick a flapper of the same size (most universal will work). Once you get a new one in there - turn the water back on. With a new one it'll seal properly and ...


6

The hole is to provide atmospheric pressure inside as a reference for the gauge. That is, the pressure indicated is relative to ambient pressure. Or, in other words, the gauge indicates how much more pressure there is inside the pipe than outside the gauge. If the gauge is leaking through the air vent, it is time to replace the gauge. The internal ...


5

There are two basic types of valves--the ones where you turn a handle many times to go from off to full and the ball valves that only turn 90 degrees. In my experience the latter are far more reliable, I've never had one fail in any way. The type you crank many times is another matter--leak city as far as I'm concerned. For shutoff valves there's always ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible