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26

Given the high likelihood of lead based paint, I would not under your current circumstances attack this with a grinder or a sander. You'll create lead-contaminated dust which will haunt you for a long time. Doubly so if any children come into contact with your house. EPA pamphlet here: EPA RRP So, it would seem that you can either remove and replace the ...


23

Is lead really there? First and foremost, check your assumption about the presence of lead. Lead appears in 2 places: certain bold pigments like orange and red lead oxides (not that yellow chromium is particularly healthy) Second, it appears as a cheap pigment called "white lead", used in cheap paints. (better paints used what they still use, titanium ...


19

If you go to your local hardware store, no. Products sold in the US have to be lead free, since 1996 In 1996 Congress further amended the Safe Drinking Water Act, requiring plumbing fittings and fixtures (endpoint devices) to be in compliance with voluntary lead leaching standards. The amendments also prohibited the introduction into commerce of any pipe, ...


8

There are plenty of plumbing fittings used for non-potable water that are still being made which contain lead in the brass alloy. The lead free ball valves usually have a NSF icon on them. Ball valves are used in many applications and industries and only the ones used specifically for drinking water would need to be lead free. For example: Leaded http://...


7

I sympathise with you your situation. I am sure that most of us have started a job that has become a lot tougher than anticipated with no easy way back. I know I have. Try a different paint stripper. I found that some work better than others and some work better with certain types of paint. Shop around on websites specialising in painting or wood finishing ...


6

You need to remove flaking and loose paint or else it will eventually chip off and be a hazard in itself. One approach is to avoid sanding and do a moderate scraping with a carbide paint scraper. This will generate some flakes which can be much more easily contained than dust from sanding. Vacuum with a shop vac and wear a mask. Then prime and paint ...


6

The short answer is Yes, X-ray lead paint detectors can 'see' lead through top layers of non-lead paint. But it depends to some degree on the thickness of the layers of paint as well as the type of X-ray detector 'gun' used. There are 2 types used for lead detection: K X-rays and L X-rays. The K X-rays have higher energy than the L, which means that they ...


5

Lead was used as a pigment. White lead was used in cheaper paints; quality paints used titanium dioxide, which is now the dominant white pigment. Lead (II, IV) oxide yields a bold red pigment. Lead chromate (boy, there's a nasty customer for you) yields a yellow pigment. Mineral pigments, including all these mentioned here, are naturally resistant to ...


5

Stop guessing if there's lead I bought a mid-1970s house right on the edge of where lead paint was banned. We had some older windows, so I bought a lead test kit and made certain there was no lead. The kit wasn't terribly expensive, the results are guaranteed and it's easy to use (100% DIY). If the test comes back negative, sand that sucker down (200+ grit, ...


4

For posterity's sake, in the end after some testing we decided to go with approach #4 (the skim-coat). We did one layer of Zinsser Gardz sealer over everything, and then we used this skim-coating process, doing multiple coats of thinned-out lightweight joint compound applied with a roller and a rubber-edged 14" wide "Magic Trowel". That process gave us a ...


4

Definitely read up on the EPA 'renovation repair and painting' rule. Option #3, the 1/4" drywall, is likely to produce the best and cleanest results, at the cost of loss of room space and alteration in the look of all your trim. You'll have to extend all outlets also. Of course that sounds suspiciously like what happened last time. Eventually your room ...


4

The magic words you want are "RRP", the EPA Renovation, Repair and Painting rules. For a simple residential demolition that's all you need. For details see http://www2.epa.gov/lead/renovation-repair-and-painting-program Homeowners can take the RRP certification course (I did), but in most cases you'll want to ask the contractor for their RRP certification ...


4

Don't sand, that puts lead dust all over the place. Get some medium plastic and taped it to the wall and extend it out 6-12 feet to catch all the chips. Scrape it carefully so all the chips fall on the plastic. When done, roll up the plastic to trap the chips and dust, tape it closed, and dispose in the trash. (I don't like that step, but last I heard, ...


4

Whatever generates the least dust. Hand wash (least dust) Hand scraping Hand sanding (wet if possible) Power sanding (most dust) (should be connected to HEPA vac Murphy oil soap (trademark for soap recommended for wood) on the dirty sections. Prime with the best, most tenacious primer. Pros must follow the EPAs RRP rules: mask off work areas, put down ...


4

Get an extension lead rated for 13 A. You can get rubberised ones which are a bit tougher - you don't want to skimp on the price. Make sure it has some provision for mounting it on the wall and do so (use screws that won't rust, like brass or zinc-galvanised). That way, if water gets into the garage (like on those days it rains sideways) it won't get to the ...


4

It most likely means you have lead paint underneath a coat of latex paint. In places where’s there’s a crack in the latex, the tester is responding to the lead. If there’s no small children and the paint isn’t peeling, it’s often best to keep the lead in place by putting another coat of latex paint on top, sealing it. Trying to remove the lead by sanding ...


3

Beyond simply identifying whether you have lead, there are two main reasons to consider getting a more thorough XRF lead inspection: If you're trying to fully de-lead your home, this is a thorough test to determine if the deleading project has been successful. If your goal is to make your home safer without going as far as a full deleading project, you can ...


3

You are correct in that lead is pretty inert, especially when encapsulated. I would only worry about proper disposal once you are done with it, and how you plan to shape it (since a drill or saw could cause lead to become airborne, hammering should be safer). If you are worried about health and safety, perhaps a different metal could be used, though they're ...


3

This sounds like a good project for a modern paint stripper. Get a sample size of SoyGel (or CitriStrip or whatever), and cover the whole surface with the goop. Then cover the gel with strips of plastic wrap, and leave it overnight. In the morning, you'll be able to remove it easily with a scraping tool; it just melts off. Repeat as needed if you have ...


3

Wear a mask while sanding or scraping. Clean up with towels and a wet solvent. Don't eat the lead chips.


3

Stop sanding immediately! Lead based dust is the worst threat of all. Simply painting over it to encapsulate it is the simplest measure. To fully remove the lead paint is a big chore, and important to do right. Look for local community classes if you can - the local one here had some classes on lead certification. The short answer is, you have to ...


3

The pipes were sealed with lead. Prior to pouring the lead a packing material ("oakum" not sure on spelling) was packed into the joint. This material can be cut out with a screwdriver, trying to heat it would make a big mess. In most cases when I need to open a cast drain I will cut a small section out at least the diameter of the pipe but usually slightly ...


3

For a house built in 1949 it would be amazing if original paint did not contain lead. The color has nothing to do with it. Most lead containing paint was white ; in the atmospheric sulfur of an urban environment it would slightly yellow. Zinc and calcium were also used and offset the yellowing . Then when titanium came along , bright white paint with high ...


3

If the test shows negative you don’t need to worry. I don’t remember stain having lead (state required lead removal class). Just to calm your fears, even if there was lead when you recoat it would seal the lead under the new layer (this is why on painted surfaces you score the surface because if the last coat is lead free the test will show negative). So I ...


3

Grab a sander or grinder, and wet sand it. It'll be a 2-man job, one of you sanding, one constantly wetting. If you've got a plant sprayer or similar (the ones you pump to pressurise), that'll make applying consistent water easier. You want enough water to keep the dust down, but not too much to annoy your tools. A good quality one will be more tolerant of ...


2

What is mandatory for contractors is suggested for homeowners. Lead dust is what you want to avoid: Manual scraping is much better than power. Hand sanding is much better than power sanders Wet wipe down is much better sweeping dry HEPA vacs are much safer than ordinary shop vacs Common sense stuff: N95 (or better, EPA suggests N or P 100) dust ...


2

Long Term Update: I did use one of these "expanding" repair flanges and it was fine. It's been over two years since the repair with no issues! Toilet Flange OATEY Mfr #: 43539


2

Lead isn't soluble in water (although some lead containing compounds are), so most filtration smaller than ~1 micron is typically quite effective at removing lead. Just look for a filter with a NSF/ANSI Standard 53 rating - it needs a 99% lead reduction to certify (link leads to a specific filter, but does list the qualifying criteria). Other contaminants ...


2

1939? We all know what that means: your house probably has both* things in it. You haven't moved in yet so that's good. Get as much demo done as humanly possible in this first go. Hopefully your next rehab will wait until the kids are older; when lead will be less of a concern towards their development. Don't ever let your roof or the siding leak, or there ...


2

Are you removing the lead paint (or painted boards) as part of the renovation? If so, I would wait until I was done removing the lead paint that you already know about, and then get a lead inspection to help you find anywhere that you might have missed. If you are uncertain about a wall, and want to wait for the inspection, that sounds reasonable. I really ...


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