49

This sounds like that impact has bent the crankshaft, which means that the engine will either need replacing or to be rebuilt. You need to decide whether a 2 hour drive to get a quote with the waiting for repairs to be completed is worth it or just to buy a new one....


27

Minimal protection when using a corded electric lawnmower is to power it from a GFCI protected outlet/circuit. If your outdoor outlets do not have GFCI built in, or if you are running your extension from a regular indoor outlet, you can purchase standalone GFCI devices to go between the extension cord and the power source. To answer your question directly - ...


23

Yes, but the better question is "how dangerous?", and the answer is "not very". Assuming your outdoor outlets are up to modern code, they're protected by GFCI and will trip even without a high-current short to neutral or ground. If you don't have GFCI outlets, you could upgrade them or just use an extension cord with GFCI protection. But even without GFCI, ...


22

Check for a sheared flywheel key. It connects the flywheel to the crank shaft and it's designed to break with less force than it would take to cause permanent damage to the engine. Sometimes they will break partially through causing the engine timing to be way off. It would cause symptoms similar to what you're describing. Once you get it running again be ...


19

Mower blades are generally sold with the length designation matching the mower deck width. A larger riding mower may have a swathe width of 42", but they'll usually use two or more blades in a side-by-side or staggered configuration rather than one large blade. So before buying, figure out what brand your mower is, and what the deck width is. Then when you'...


19

Drain the oil. Refill with new clean oil. Check the manufacturer's documentation for oil change procedure, and type of oil to add. Looks like the drain plug on your mower is just below the oil filler tube. To change the oil: Remove the spark plug cap. Tip the mower so that the oil can drain without flowing across the deck (Make sure the mower is ...


15

It will smoke badly and may indeed foul the plug(s). It will be less of a problem if you only use a SMALL amount of mix fuel in each tank, so the oil is more diluted. IMHO, IME, if you use THAT little fuel in your weed whacker, you probably should sell it and buy an electric one, either corded or rechargeable. If you don't want to do that, then you should ...


11

You say mower in the body of your question, but the title could attract people looking for answer about adding it to their cars. Your car or truck will easily consume leftover 2-stroke fuel. I typically don't do more than 1/2 gallon of 2-stroke fuel to 10 gallons in my tank. The small amount of bad gas and/or 2-stroke oil will be diluted. Your car doesn'...


11

Sheet aluminum and pop rivets. Extra points for using old beer cans as the aluminum source, label side out, but flashing is a bit thicker than today's beer cans. Hairy (loaded with fiber reinforcement) Bondo. "Bondo Hair" is the actual label on the can. Some screws or pop-rivets might still be needed to help the bond to the plastic at the edges. Looks awful,...


11

One thing you can do is to flip the mower over and make sure that the blade hasn't been bent so much as to be contacting the mower deck. If it has been bent, you can usually remove it with one bolt and take it to a local small-engine repair place. They'll be able to unbend a bent blade for you, or at least sell you a replacement.


9

It will be 100% completely fine. I have a 2 stroke racing off road dirtbike that requires 93 octane fuel and a 32:1 mix with racing oil. And frequently, that is the only gas can I have on hand because my other yard maintenance equipment runs on diesel. I have a push mower that I use to do small areas of my yard, where the tractor with the 60 inch deck ...


9

Electric with cable, hands down. They are cheaper than battery powered, and all electric mowers will be much quieter than gas powered mowers. The only consideration is if your yard is too large for a cord to reach the far corners. The best advice I can give you with regards to the cord is to not run over it. Yes, you might not cut the cord, yes, you might ...


7

This exact thing happened to me last year (Husqvarna mower, long grass, hit a pipe, clang, mower stopped, cord stuck) and it was a bent blade. Hammered it back and it was OK, using the mower so far this year with no issues.


6

In my experience, unless the engine is running roughly idle problems are usually related to the throttle and governor. From your description, it sounds like you may have a problem with the governor spring that tensions the governor vane to the throttle body. These can get stretched out and lose tension creating a slow idle.


6

Nothing is guaranteed but I think the odds of you messing up the fuel/oil mixture yourself are greater than getting a bad batch from the factory. So I would say yes, the pre-mixed fuel is a safer bet. Also if you buy pre-mixed fuel there is less risk of water/dirt getting into your gas cans. However I personally think it's not worth it. Buying pre-mixed ...


5

The "article" you linked to is written by the manufacturer of STA-BIL, a brand of fuel stabilizer. So I would take the entire thing with an enormous grain of salt. I don't see how you can go wrong following the advice of the lawn mower manufactorer. Personally for my small engines I switch to stabilized fuel sometime in the fall so that it works its way ...


5

It doesn't take bad gas or ethanol to crud up tiny carb jets and orifices. Any gas gets old and any gas dries into varnish over time, especially that which has been mixed with two-stroke oil. Proper storage is critical. Seek out an exploded diagram or a how-to and disassemble your carb. Make note of all screw settings (count turns to fully seated) and take ...


5

It's rotating free because there's no tension on it. It will probably seize up a bit under load. The bearings are probably shot maybe due to the grass fire burning the grease seals. try replacing that pulley.


4

I'm sure nobody would counsel you to sidestep rules and regulations, but if you google "ez pour water spout", you might find something like a water spout that's similar to an old gas spout that ships to 50 states. (For what it's worth, I might possibly be a satisfied user of this product, but use your own judgment.)


4

Many lawnmowers use a plastic vane under the engine shroud that interacts with air moving off fins on the flywheel to work as a speed control mechanism to open and close the carburetor throttle valve in response to the engine speed changing because of loading changes. Lawnmowers often operate in very dusty environments and the linkages associated with the ...


4

Both can be a reason. If you overload an electric motor it will draw more than the rated value causing the breaker to trip. The second reason is excessive length of a small cord can cause a large voltage drop browning out the motor causing higher than normal current. A 15A breaker is only truly rated for 12A with a continuous load (more than 3 hours) or ...


4

Blue smoke means it's burning oil. This could be from you overfilling the crankcase but if it is an older engine it may have been burning a little oil before the oil was added. The key here is, was it running okay after the oil change? If the problem started afterwards it then that is the likely cause. Most small engines like that don't have an oil pump ...


4

I use an electric mower with a power cable and have three yards that need mowing. I don't have a problem but have become skilled at cable management. Its important to know where your cable is and flick it away to the mowed area when you need to get past it. In order to mow as hassle free as possible I always begin from as close to the socket as possible ...


4

Remove the air filter and spray a small blast of starting fluid into the carburetor. It should run for a second or two. If it does then the problem is the gas is most likely old/bad. If it doesn't run for even a split second then you're not getting any spark which means you have an ignition problem which is most likely a fouled spark plug.


3

See the holes through the pulley face? Insert the heftiest screwdriver, steel rod, or what-have-you which fits and rest that against the biggest thing below it which does not turn. Use that to prevent the pulley from turning. Probably, you'll have to dedicate one hand to that while loosening. Look carefully at the exposed thread. The photo is not clear ...


3

Contractors at construction sites often place their valuable gear out of reach of potential theives. Now expecting that this approach may not be practical in your particular case the next best advice is "out of sight is less tempting". Wheel your gear into a shed or garage and lock it up.


3

A file is quick and effective. Push the file (or pull from the non-handle end) towards the edge of the beveled side of the LM blade. Do this until it is bright and shiny. This will have created a burr on the flat side of the blade. So remove the burr by pushing the file on the flat side of LM blade towards the blade. Keep the file as flat as possible. ...


3

The answer is maybe. Some companies build tractors for many different brands. E.g. Husqvarna sells their own brand of riding mowers but also makes the current Craftsman line with only minor differences in the plastic body. So a lot of attachments between those two are interchangeable (and again, made by Husqvarna). I think they also make Poulan tractors. ...


3

Buy a replacement hood ASAP if you have this thing sitting outside. An old hood will cost you $50. Everything under it will wear/rust much faster with no hood.


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