7

Spackling's best use is to fill holes made by pictures, curtain holders, etc. To fix cracks in plaster, use Plaster of Paris or Durabond, not spackling compound. Cracks are caused by moving or shifting, so one needs to make sure the existing plaster and corresponding substrate (in this case the lath) are solid. A simple test is on both sides of the crack ...


7

Find the lowest point in the ceiling and place a small pencil mark there. Then measure from the floor to that point and record the measurement. Periodically re-measure and if measurement is getting smaller, then the sagging is getting worse.


6

Put a camera on a tripod, have it take a picture at the same time every day, and then overlay the pictures on each other.


6

Your best option is a jab saw and a steady hand. If your question is how to do it while spending no money the answer is substituting the saw blade in a multi-tool or Swiss Army Knife. Failing that, scoring the plaster with a utility or X-acto and carefully breaking it out.


5

You could taper the sections together with joint compound (though you wouldn't sand it into shape--that would be ludicrously laborious). However, you'd probably still see the transition at the floor and ceiling. Better, use furring strips on the new section of wall to result in a flush finished surface. 1/4" luan plywood or OSB is cheap and easy to work ...


5

Since this got ZERO love, and I have finished the job, figured I would post what I did. Simply bought some wire mesh from the local home goods store, and screwed it directly into the wood lathe after breaking out the hole a bit more. That gave me a good base for my 20 minute hot mud to mushroom through. As for the rounded corner -- it was nothing ...


5

tear it all down, replace with regular sheetrock / drwywall.


4

This Old House mentioned a product called Big Wally's Plaster Magic, in an article Plaster Repair Made Easier. I've never used this product before, however, the theory of how it works is sound. In your case (old house), the house has likely already finished settling. Settling combined with the years of service the house has provided, may have caused some ...


4

The plaster is likely cracking due to movement/shifting/settling in your house. If you want to keep the plaster, the only real solution is to correct the root problem. Now, usually an old house would have already settled, so there might be a bigger question/problem as to why it is continuing to do so. Not to sound any alarms, but you should investigate this....


4

It's not up to code to leave the wire free. Stapling it to the center of the stud ensures that a nail for something like a picture won't hit the wire (as long as you know this code and don't try to drive a long nail right next to a stud). No one but yourself is likely to ever know this is wrong, and given the age of the home, it's sure to have a lot of other ...


4

There is a category of power tool called a multi-tool that is basically a very small saw usefull in cutting in tight spaces. After you cut the initial hole, this tool could be used to trim away the area in the uper section on an angle to make room for your retaining arms. The tools come in corded and cordless version, and at various price points. The are ...


4

What I have done on my 1909 house (I am in the U.S.) in the same exact situation is clear a wider area of the lath and plaster and replace it with drywall. To do that, you will need to add some padding over the studs because the lath&plaster is thicker than 1/2" -- what I did was pad it with 3/8" plywood, then drywall over plywood to achieve ...


4

16 inches on center. Note that lathe and plaster has a number of advantages over more modern drywall, but studfinding is not among those. A standard stud finder you might buy or rent is likely to give confusing results. However a super powerful magnet, or a magnet based stud finder, will work just dandy. A row of small nails runs up and down each stud ...


4

The closeup looks like cement based backer board used to hold tile in wet/damp locations. If so, that is not original. It would be very hard to restore to lathe/plaster throughout, especially if sections are missing. The transition points for repairs tend to crack and show lines. Also, wire mesh is used more than wood lath today. Finding a skilled plasterer ...


4

Shim out the framing to get the drywall flush. I've often used 5/8" drywall with no shims, depending on the plaster thickness and patch configuration, but otherwise shim it. 1/8" hardboard is cheap and easy to work with. Or rip some scrap lumber to size. Staple it in place and be happy. Update: After seeing your photo, I suggest re-cutting your edges ...


4

There are two factors: Your level of care, and dumb luck. If the plaster hasn't proven to be particularly crumbly in your home, I'd go ahead and use that type of anchor, or this one: Some tips: Drill carefully. Don't push too hard and use a high spin rate. You might switch to a fresh bit when you encounter wood. You don't want to blow the lath out the ...


3

Assuming you plan to live in the house while this is going on, you should seriously look at the plastic "curtain" products which can be used to isolate the construction zone. They can tremendously reduce how much dust gets into the rest of the house. Speaking of dust, a serious dust mask (one that achieves a good seal against the face rather than the cheap "...


3

I am a drywall and plaster contractor in Va. The guy above told you correctly. The problem with wood lath is: once you start to cut it or re-screw it back up where cracks are, the lath pulls away from the studs, causing the cracks to get worse. If you are determined to use plaster, you must use a bonding agent, plaster weld, for the new plaster to adhere to ...


3

Once you have the hole made, could you not break off the other layers with your hand or a small prying tool? You'd probably only need an extra 1/2" diameter outside of the hole for the cans clips to catch. Or you could even just mark where the clips are and just chip away some layers at that exact location.


3

The fact that sections are peeling off indicates that there is a structural problem with the overall "sandwich." In any repair, unless you can overcome the structural deficiencies with an overriding mechanism, you have to strip back the unsound sections until you get to good structure. With you description , it is hard to see where that is. You could ...


3

I have had a lot of success in the past by using a mixture of PVA Glue and water and then painting the solution over the crumbling area. The glue gets absorbed into the crumbling surface and stabilises it. Then you can refinish with a thin coat of filler or plaster. It saves a lot of work.


3

To answer the original question, the studs at either end of the closet will not need to define the dimensions. The stud at either can be screwed in place. Do not use nails. The vibration from setting the nail will break off the keys of plaster that hold the plaster up on the wall. Use enough screws to increase the chances of finding the wood lath to secure ...


3

Screws in wallboard do not support anything. Unless your screws hit a stud or an anchor of some sort, the bracket is decorative, not functional. If there is not a stud in the immediate vicinity, you need to use a serious anchor. I would recommend using a strap toggle type anchor behind the bottom screw and one of the top screws. The bolt can be replaced ...


3

I don't understand option 2, but option 1 is exactly what I'd do. A few suggestions: Be sure that the thickness of your drywall brings it to flush or slightly below. Do not install patches that protrude above the wall surface. This will be difficult to tape without leaving a bulge. If you end up with a depression after installing the patches, pre-fill ...


2

You should first remove any loose debris before filling it. I would also advise removing the wall paper around the area you are patching. If you patch on top of the wallpaper, when you go to remove it you will end up damaging that spot again. You will likely need a few applications to completely fill an area of that size.


2

Where I live, there are two or three places that specialize in fireplaces, like a re-modeler's dream. Find what you have locally and take a picture of your fireplace and your neighbors fireplace (before and after) and explain what it takes to change yours. Then you will know what you need and whether it is something you want to handle as a DIY'er or pay to ...


2

A story pole: You cut a piece of molding to just fit at the spot in question. Very accurate in a differential sense. Used in brick laying, tiling, kitchen cabinets, when ever repetitive measurements from a baseline are used. For gadget freaks, (like me) a laser measuring tool is fast and accurate, but you must write down and keep track of the ...


2

A recip saw is a great tool. I'd also pick up a shop vac if you don't have one. Demoing plaster walls is a hard and messy job. I'd use the side of the sledge against the wall; that breaks the front of the plaster off of the lath, and you can then remove it and follow by removing the lath.


2

Before you attempt to repair it, make sure that the cause of the ice dam has been fixed. You may need to insulate the ceiling, and/or add a styrofoam vent baffle to the inside of the roof to prevent that area from getting too warm. Ice and water shield installed on the roof probably would have also prevented this from happening. The repair will depend on ...


2

I'm in the process of a large plaster-and-lath removal; my methods have evolved over the course of the project, maybe these tips will help others who find this question. I found that it's easiest to peel the lath one or two pieces at a time. Pull it with a pry bar or crowbar exactly where it's nailed to the joist (in my case this meant four places), and ...


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