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8

What you are looking for is a rim lock


3

The shim is not visible, so you could make your own shim out of cardboard -- more than one layer, if needed.


3

Possibly a sliding vertical bolt, as more typically seen on the "non-knob side" of double doors? Or hang the key to that deadbolt on the doorframe, since it's already there - change to a double-cylinder if it's not an egress path and the other side is a latch, or turn it around and don't need the key on this side. Or post a notice that it's not to ...


2

I believe you're going to find that the lock itself is not the weak link in this mailbox product. The doors are thin Aluminum and I believe are easily pried open with a standard screwdriver or similar tool. You can replace the lock with a high-security version if there is such a product available for this model, and you still will not solve the problem. I ...


1

Why not just add a piece of blocking behind the latch and move the latch receiving hole into the kerfed board? You could paint the blocking black or something that matches the latch hardware.


1

If the latching mechanism is adjustable, then just a few washers behind that plate will bring it out. Your home store will also have shim sets. If the latching mechanism isn't adjustable and can't be moved out, then you have to find a round hole strike plate that will fit over your "latch plate" to fill in the space. You'll need something like the ...


1

It looks like you're measuring the screw distances correctly, centerline of screw to centerline of screw. If you can't find exactly what you want online, try hitting a few locksmith shops. There is some tolerance in mounting these. Depending on the type, you can drill new holes or with a small round file, turn the existing holes into slotted holes. I have ...


1

In the second picture, the little thing that pops out (pointed at by the left-hand arrow) is a stop to prevent the window from opening more than about an inch. This way, when the window is open a little, nobody can open the window further from the outside to use it as a way of getting into your house. They can be a bit of a pain to latch down so the window ...


1

The easiest way is to block the hole in the door jam that the latch goes into (I honestly have no idea what this is called). One way would be to put a strip of tape (probably blue painter’s tape) across it. Another way is to cut a piece of something to fit inside the hole which can easily be removed later (back in high school, I witnessed a classmate use a ...


1

Change the lock to either a magnetic one - which will always open with a push or pull or a spring-loaded roller one that will do the same.


1

If there is a groove in the collar, you could use a snap ring or an e-clip. You could also use a push-on retaining ring, sometimes called an knob spring or an internal tooth retainer.


1

I had a similar problem with a Sierra Pacific door. On mine you raise the handle (clockwise) to lock and lower the handle (counter clockwise) to unlock. I lowered the handle as far as it would go and then with a small screw driver pry the pins up / down to fully retract the locking mechanism. That would be your pin in picture #2 and the one that goes into ...


1

Your door already has a deadbolt. They have the same form factor as a door knob. Just buy a “privacy” (bathroom) door knob set and replace the deadbolt with that.


1

I looked into this as it was something that I had not heard of before. I did find a US site that sold such handles but their latch mechanism is quite a bit larger than the typical door latch. Marchello and Rome A second option would be to buy a European latch and fit it to the door. Link The Backset is slightly different (57mm = 2 1/4" versus a ...


1

When closing the door -- turn the knob to retract the latch tongue, pull the door quietly shut and hold it there, then turn the knob back to quietly let the latch tongue into the strike plate. With a little practice you can do this absolutely silently. When your children are older they will learn to do this when they want to sneak out.


1

A Dremel may be able to work but it is also possible to way overdo the grinding that a high speed tool like this can do. If all you want to do is to break sharp corners all you need is a low cost hand file. File with a cutting surface called a mill file will give you nice smooth cuts of the sharp edges. Here is a typical mill cut file. Picture Source


1

Sash lock or casement window sash lock. duckduckgo I have seen them at the home improvement stores. I call them a pain in the ***


1

After speaking with a few door specialist stores for doors. I had to settle for buying two privacy sets and latch mechanisim to allow for opening/unlatching on both sides of the sliding door. (Each specialist was perplexed they did'nt actually have a product to cover this situation.)


1

I was able to find it. It is called a 'Patio Door Keeper for Yale Ogron Sliding Glass Door', by manufacturer Barton Kramer. Home Depot Link


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