4

You just need a t5 tombstone, that looks like a tall one measure it and places like 1000 bulbs.com or other places have them, depending on quanties for less than a buck. Just make sure if shunted or non shunted you get the correct type, if you get non shunted you can always add a jumper if needed.


4

It means "don't wire that end of the tube to both live and neutral -- you can have it be the live-end of the tube or the neutral-end of the tube, but not both". Whoever wrote it was clearly not a native English speaker; also, the illustration is a much better explanation of what the deal is.


3

Keep that is the guess of some yo-yo's on a discussion forum, and even though it's an electrician forum, fluorescent internals are not really their bailiwick. (Being unclear on whether T8 and T12 have same pin spacing? Please.) But it's not untrue; instant-start ballasts can have some fairly impressive arcing, since they see bad contact in a tombstone as ...


2

You can't hack a shunted lampholder to be a non-shunted unless it's designed to do that. For one thing there is no place to attach the wires. Yes, there are two wire holes, but a non-shunted holder has four. You have three options: stay with instant-start fluorescent... I am because the CRI is better change lampholders to non-shunted type take care to ...


2

Lamps are made to be used on both electronic and magnetic ballasts. I have a meter that identifies magnetic and electronic from the ground. They cost about $100.00 and are not a stock item. You can order one from any ballast manufacturer. Meltdowns are caused by loose fitting lamps. The spring loaded contact and the pin from the lamps keep arcing during use ...


1

I have never seen just the ends being sold. I have seen "bare" fixtures ie no ballast for ~10$ at places like 1000bulbs.com I believe they came with t8/t12 style non shunted tombstones.


1

I am only guessing here ... I'd describe them as tombstone bases if I were ordering over the phone. Maybe "tombstone brackets"? Sounds more official. Wouldn't it be cheaper and less trouble simply to buy a new complete fixture?


1

Your terminology is correct: they're called tombstone (or bi-pin) fluorescent lampholders. In particular, those in the photo are locking or turn-type, a nice safety feature that makes it less likely for a lamp to fall out of the socket. A search at Amazon.com for Fluorescent Tombstone Lampholder found more than 30 similar devices. N.B. There are two types, ...


1

First I check for obvious fitment of the tubes and conditions of the tombstones. For instance one easy problem is failing to rotate the tube a full 90 degrees, so it doesn't properly engage. On T8/T12 tubes there are score marks to help tell you where center is. Can't speak to T5. If that all checks out, and fitting new lamps doesn't make them all ...


1

It really depends on the tombstones your light fixture came with. I did the LED retrofit for all the light fixtures in my plant, and some of the fixtures had tombstones that only had two holes on one side, some tombstones had only one hole on each side. I was able to modify a lot of the tombstones that originally came with the light fixtures, but there ...


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