15

It depends on a couple of things. How much time you want to invest, how your current baseboards are installed, size of current baseboards, and what you want everything to look like. As long as it isn't a HUGE deal to take baseboards out I would almost always go with removing them. Your finish will look better. No quarter round looks way more professional....


8

There are two ways to install flooring in areas of different heights. The cheapest and easiest method is to install transition pieces or thresholds between the areas of different heights. These transitions are available in different matching shapes and heights for most laminates. Common use is to join carpeted, tiled or other floors, to new flooring height. ...


6

Sure you can. I'd recommend using a sharp Forsner type drill bit or sharp hole saw to avoid chipping the laminate. Cover the laminate with painter's tape and mark your hole centers. If your using a single 4" faucet fixture, use a template to drill the holes. If you are using separate handles/neck. the common spacing is 8 inches, but again, use the template....


6

I ended up ripping the laminate boards lengthwise using my jigsaw and fitting them in like Jim suggested. I used some cardboard to cut out the shape that the long pieces should be and then drew across the edge of the cardboard piece on the laminate boards. It worked out quite well I think and I hope there won’t be any structural support issues. The ...


5

The fact that the laminate was soaked with water caused it to swell. Drying it won't allow it to contract completely. Add to that the flooring was laid on concrete. Was there a vapor barrier between the concrete and the laminate? If not then the flooring had been drawing moisture from the concrete for a long time before the water leak. You are lucky you were ...


4

For an inexpensive and easy to work with material I would consider MDF. In particular there is coloured MDF available. The colour is throughout the board, not just painted on the surface, here's an example: The benefit of this is that simply scratching the surface will not remove the colour. It also gives the MDF a neat texture as the colour is not 100% ...


4

You should remove the baseboard, install the flooring, and then reinstall the baseboard. At least that's how I do it. Most people leave the baseboard in place, and cover the expansion gap with quarter-round or shoe molding. If you're going to do it this way, you'll have to leave the manufacturer recommended expansion gap between the flooring and the ...


4

Guessing that the luan subflooring is only 1/4" thick I would strongly suggest that you remove it. Since the existing carpet squares are glued down to it I suspect it would be way more work trying to remove all the glue and prep its surface to a suitable condition for the laminate flooring. If you tried to leave the luan subflooring any type of transition ...


3

There are lots of grades of laminate flooring. When I say lots maybe hundreds. These are the main things that figure in on how moisture will affect your laminate (almost all apply to engineered wood): Locking system. I have put together some laminate that have a very "loose" locking system. To the point where there are tiny gaps. Not an install issue,...


3

According to their web site at http://na.pergo.com/HowTo_FAQ.aspx they state: Pergo floors must never be waxed, polished, sanded or refinished and never use a wet or jet mop when cleaning. Given that Pergo's surface is just a printed substrate, odds are the printing, itself, has faded. Probably time to replace. An easy 'fix' might be to get some runners ...


3

I had a similar issue happen with my dishwasher and counter top laminate. What I ended up doing is peeling it back a bit more to give me access, and picked up some laminate/veneer cement (it is similar to rubber cement). You apply to both the laminate and the substrate, let it dry for 15 minutes (until it is no longer glossy) then push the two pieces ...


3

Particle board with laminate. Cut laminate so it's a little larger, glue it on with contact cement and trim the edges with a router. Cheap and durable. + =


3

As long as the boards come apart without damaging them, and appear to be in good condition with no water damage, sure!


3

Without more specific brand information my definitive answer is likely not. The reason being that most prefinished lock together flooring is designed to float. By float it should be able to expand and contract independent of the base layer or sub floor. Since you have at least two different types it is likely they will expand and contract at different rates. ...


3

I did exactly this to fit a slightly bigger sink into an existing countertop made from laminated chipboard. The difference in size was very little (perhaps 5mm) I used a cheap jigsaw - it was a struggle and the line was not straight but I managed to keep the top edge of the cut within my marked rectangle. Part of the problem was finding a long enough blade ...


3

One way to test a wall for straightness is to stretch a string from corner to corner. A good practice when doing this is to space the string out in the corners by the thickness of a board. Then the gap between the string and wall all along can be checked to see how even the wall is. The gap can even be checked with another piece of board that has the same ...


3

We did this and cheated; at some doorways we stopped and covered the join with a rather smart strip of brass. This makes it a lot easier, especially if: your house is not quite square the floors are not quite flat you have big temperature variations you want to have different rooms not running the same way you want the doors to close snugly


3

This is a floating floor, when you rip the pieces and install them they will be partly covered by the mouldings. This is the normal way to install this type of flooring.


3

There appears to be insufficient gap and the range appears to be too low. The easiest thing would be to raise the range by 3/4 inch to 1 inch. This might reduce heating of those areas. EDIT Might benefit from a stainless steel gap cover like this https://www.amazon.com/Stainless-Steel-Counter-SILICONE-splatter/dp/B089B6G3XZ Current gap covers appears to be ...


2

I built a very similar desk using A-grade birch finish ply. It requires some careful jigsaw work for the corner part. I faced it using hardwood planks, routed and sanded. The entire desk was then urethaned, for a hard and durable finish.


2

Yes, you can install the faucet directly into the laminate countertop. I wouldn't use an under-mount sink with a laminate countertop, because the corners in a laminate countertop are weak points. But a separate faucet with a self-rimming sink should be fine.


2

If you remove the baseboard, you risk damaging the walls. Installing the laminate with quarter round will be much easier and won't damage the existing walls. That's the only "better" we can answer. Aesthetically, "better" is wholly subjective. But I I think it'll look just as good either way, so go with easier and less damaging.


2

Your best bet then would to get an artist brush and acrylic paint from an art supply or craft store. That can be blended to get the color you need to touch it in, though replacing it would be my choice to do. All told it would take less time, and about the same cost, if you have the cutting tools.


2

From the Pergo Installation Instructions (Section 10d, page 6): If the Pergo Product being installed has an attached foam underlayment then use only a vapor barrier when installing over a concrete subfloor. When installing a Pergo Product with an attached underlayment foam over a wood subfloor no other additional acoustic underlayment should be ...


2

I am sorry I don't have time to research this right now but I will give you a quick answer and maybe edit later. First - call Pergo and ask. Second, I have installed 4 different types of Pergo+underlayment and all of them say to take out old underlayment. I think there is first an issue with the floor becoming too spongy and second if there is spongy/...


2

Option B is a fine way to start, if possible check 2 things. If possible shift your row if you can to get a potential butt joint out of the doorway. It is always best to eliminate joints in the doorways since it is always a high traffic area.The elimination of the added piece in option 1 is the reason I did go for option 1. Secondly, adjust how much you cut ...


2

Laminate flooring is intended to survive reasonable moisture that might be spilled. Moisture should be mopped up as soon as possible on any floor. If there were significant flooding, the laminate (and almost any real wood floor) would be at risk of damage beyond repair. Almost no floor is truly waterproof.


2

I have fabricated custom counter tops for customers, and have also installed the preformed counter tops with the attached back-splash. The main issue of concern, when cutting laminated counter tops, is the tendency for the laminate to chip or break in an undesirable way, which may ruin the results of your efforts. However, there are simple tricks that can be ...


2

Two major considerations for basement flooring are moisture and comfort. Moisture is the primary consideration -- concrete floors are cool and porous and will permit moisture to infiltrate from underneath and condense from above. Obviously, you'll want to keep standing moisture away from wooden floors to prevent damage. There are various methods of doing ...


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