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21

Even if the windows were super thick, it wouldn't be strong enough to handle the pressure exerted by a properly positioned ladder. A ladder is supposed to be sloped 25%, like this: With someone standing near the top of the ladder, that means roughly 20% of his weight is directed as lateral force, directly into the wall or window, conveyed by the points of ...


16

Don't do it. Put the ladder above the window, then clean by putting your arms through the rungs. Shouldn't the windows have a way to tilt them inward and clean from inside the house? Most every modern window I've seen has a way to do that. You may want to get a ladder stabilizer:


14

Instead of a horizontal ladder, I'd use scaffold extension plank. These are designed to work with an extension ladder or with ladder jacks. Some have clips for ladder rung attachment, I've used a pair of c-clamps (just on the extension plank, to prevent it sliding) . OSHA spec on plankings, contains span ratings for wooden planks Little Giant 8 -13 ft ...


13

That's from Best of Wordless Workshop by Ray Doty; the original was a monthly column in Popular Science. (Published sometime between 1971-1985) The retail versions probably make more sense, but you can hum the theme from the A-Team while exterminating with this one. Besides, Wordless Workshop was a great feature.


11

building a make-shift semi permanent ladder is not a great idea for a couple of reasons. First: It is very possible that your homeowner's insurance will insist it be removed or cancel your coverage. I know this for fact as my insurance company (Good Neighbor) did an informal walk around my house and discovered a homemade ladder going from the sunroom roof ...


10

Either use a A frame ladder or a squeegee on a pole. I personally wouldn't trust my health on the structural strength of glass.


10

From somebody who has done this many times, occasionally for money Get help. You can set this up to look rock solid, but no matter how secure you think it is when climbing one wrong move and you're learning to fly in milliseconds. Having a trusted friend or family member hold the ladder at all times is the only way to make this as safe as possible. ...


9

The most likely solution is to create a template and use a router with a bit that follows the template. The router would also be used for easing over any sharp edges. photo credit, sample image, not a product recommendation


8

You have to take into account a few factors: extension ladders have an overlap that isn't shown in the nominal length - for example, a 16' extension ladder has two 8' sections, but fully extended is only 13' long. the ladder will be used at an angle (usually a four to one pitch / 75 degrees) so the top of a 16' ladder won't even be at 13' in use you ...


7

I was always taught for every 4 feet up you go out a foot. This is given that you have level ground. Without level ground you might go a little further out. So "A" is 6, "B" is 24, meaning "C" is more or less 25 feet. However you want a few rungs to hang over roof line. So given that you have a level yard, a 28 foot ladder would be the shortest. ...


7

I'd rent a batch of scaffolding (or "staging"), including some extensions to accommodate the berm. You can set up two or three sections and have 20 feet or more to work from at a stretch. It should be relatively inexpensive and you'll be able to keep it for a few days for the same money as a motorized lift. The drawback is that it's a bit slow and effort-...


4

Get a combo sponge / squeegee on an extendable pole. They work very well. It is also possible to get these window washing soap bottles that have an integrated sprayer mechanism. You attach these to a garden hose for water. They easily can spray a nice and vigorous soapy stream or water at the windows over 20 feet (like 6 meters) high. Normally the ...


4

I used eye-bolts to anchor my ladder to my wall. random intertube photo - I just used rope and carabiners etc If I needed more security I would probably buy ladder-stabilisers or lash a plank to the bottom (less likely for ladder to rotate) and maybe buy a harness to clip myself to the ladder. random intertube photo For soft or uneven ground I once made ...


4

Your ladder should have a rope and pulley mechanism for extension and retraction. Make sure you understand how it operates to prevent finger injury. Normally it's simply a matter of pulling down on the front rope to raise the ladder. To retract, lift the ladder a few inches using the rope, which allows the retention brackets to release, and lower the ladder ...


3

Folded as in a folding ladder? Or as an extension ladder? I think the safest method would be to have two people hold the ladder so that you can walk the bottom of the ladder away from the wall while keeping the top of the latter close to but not actually against the wall. That way if the ladder falls, it will fall towards the structure, and not fall far ...


3

Yes. 8 high-quality gold or stainless (not black oxide) construction screws (two at each connection point) with at least 1-1/2" penetration will hold with more than enough strength for even a typical adult. In this case, use 3" or 3-1/2". Torx are much nicer to work with than Phillips. Pre-drill 3/4 of the screw's length and the diameter of the screw shank....


3

I have been in this position before. Tall ladders make me nervous, no matter how closely I follow the ladder safety setup guide. I also have a tall house in the middle of nowhere (rural area) that needs maintenance. Thus if I fall and get hurt it might be awhile before somebody could call 911 for me. I am a cheapskate, and didn't want to pay money for ...


3

The stairs should gain access to the attic in such a way that: 1) one has max. headroom, 2) the attic stairwell doesn't prevent access to any part of the attic, 3) the stairs permits a path of travel to a ground floor exterior door (ie. doesn't come down into the hallway in such a way one would have to close the stairs to exit the bldg.) 4) the stairs ...


3

I'd look at renting a tall-ish scaffold set - something like: When I'm standing that far off the floor in the middle of a room and wanting to be able to use both of my hands (as I would do when replacing a ceiling fan), I'd like a wide, firm base to stand on. As long as you can get the individual pieces into the room you want to use it, you assemble it ...


3

A rope, a ladder, and an open 2nd floor window (you might have to remove both the window sashes). Try not to scrape the side of your house as you pull the ladder up, or if you've an extension ladder, use that to get an a-frame up there. Lay a throw rug on the window frame to protect it. Option B: hire the job out for less than the cost of a ladder.


3

You ask about mitigating injury, but it seems feasible to implement preventative measures, first. The correct way to repair the siding is not with a ladder but with a boom lift or scaffolding. Doing so would avoid breaking 3 rules of ladder safety: Maintaining 3 points of contact, Not leaning to a side, and Standing on platforms instead of rungs, which are ...


2

Those hangars are designed to go into wood, but you should be able to install into concrete using lag shields, just as you would use with a lag bolt. My only concern is that lag bolts have a standards and ratings, where this ladder hangar might be of unknown strength, and could simply shear off in the lag shield. I wouldn't park my car next to or beneath it. ...


2

A tall step ladder is the best solution. With an extension ladder, you may find it easier to put the ladder against a side wall of the garage and work on this problem from above. Take some scrap boards that you can lay across the joists to support your weight while you work. Since you're likely on concrete, have someone hold the ladder or use something else ...


2

The distance the ladder base should be from the wall is 1/4 of the vertical height of the ladder contact point. The side load will be minimal. However with the ladder against the rafters it will be difficult to position the insulation and not have the ladder in the way.


2

@shirlock is right. Just about any homeowner's policy will require that you remove a ladder like what you are describing. They won't expose themselves to such potential massive liability. So the short answer is: Don't do it. With that disclaimer out of the way, if you still want to forge ahead, here's my advice on HOW to do it: The problem with what ...


2

I'd suggest simply using a hole saw and a jig saw would be sufficient. The key to using a jig saw for the straight cut is to use a saw guide on the jig saw, or an external guide support to keep the cut straight. You can either use a scrap of plywood clamped to the wood (if the width is sufficient, or make a jig (similar, but smaller, to the one described ...


2

Really guys, all that math? The most important consideration is safety, just google deaths in US caused by falls from height. Please use a ladder with appropriate duty rating and go online to take safety training before using it. Consider a fall-protection system. Extension ladders should be 7 to 10 feet longer than the highest support or contact point, ...


2

Carefully & the rental options you mentioned I totally agree with...someone to sue. But, the scissor lift would be the only good option if you're going to be scraping, driving screws with a lot of effort or ripping stuff down. The cherry picker will just bob-around & piss you off in 2-minutes, unless you can drop a homemade support or 3. But, I ...


2

I have rented this type 34’ towable personnel lift. It is around 200 a day and it takes a few minutes to set up. I am a big guy 6’5” 265lbs it handled me and my tools on soft dirt and slightly uneven ground. The advantage of this over a scissor lift is you can easily move the basket quite a few feet side to side. Many scissor lifts do have a platform that ...


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