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1

Start by shutting off the water supply for the Hot and Cold lines under the sink. Next detach (unscrew) the hot supply line from the faucet line (if possible). If you can't than unscrew the hose from the valve. Place a bucket under the valve and a rag over the open connection. Slowly open the valve to check for water flow. When (and if) water is flowing into ...


1

You'll need to cut out a strip of insulation and fill it with a piece(s) of timber/lumber and maybe a layer of plywood to achieve proper flush mounting of the rail(s). This buildup will be the only thing secured into the concrete and will be plenty solid. Once achieved, then attach your rail(s) to the buildup for your previously expected installation to ...


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Whether you like it or not, you're going to need to mount those rails into the concrete if you want the cabinet to stay on the wall. There's not much structural integrity or load bearing capacity in 1cm of plaster. There are a variety of ways of attaching things to a concrete wall, from screws (like Tapcon™ that are specifically designed to hold in concrete),...


2

I removed the latch and put a dab of epoxy on the worn "lip" of the latch where it had clearly warn, upper and lower. The worn areas are easy to see if you remove the latch assembly, which only requires removing two screws and a little wiggling. I used a file on the epoxy after it had set up. It's been two months now and it works fine, although ...


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That video is confusing. The purpose of the drain saddle is to provide a channel for the RO system to drain excess water - this is pretty standard. The problem with the current drain configuration is that the disposal runs directly into the P trap. You actually want the drain saddle installed between the disposal and the P trap. The proper setup for this is ...


2

Bad news: putting the fridge on the range hood circuit is a no-go Your first problem is that you can't, by Code, put a kitchen refrigerator on a general lighting circuit. This is a function of the way NEC 210.52(B)(1) and its exceptions are worded: (B) Small Appliances. (1) Receptacle Outlets Served. In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or ...


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No way. You need at least two kitchen countertop receptacle circuits. Those circuits can have nothing on them except: Receptacles in kitchen working areas Other general-use receptacles in the kitchen, dining area, and pantry. A wall clock. A gas oven/range with small needs for controls and oven light. A dishwasher is definitely not on that list.


4

My off-the-cuff answer is 33" minimum but 36" highly recommended. But the correct answer is: Get the installation manual for the sink. Usually available online, and if it isn't then contact the manufacturer. The installation manual will show you how much space is needed, particularly how much clearance is needed under each side of the sink, which ...


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You really need someone to look at this in person, not through an internet straw. Some notes that may help... Builders almost never use 2x10 for non-load-bearing headers. They're expensive and it's wasteful. That doesn't prove anything here, though. The drawing shows the primary bearing wall being at the back of that closet. That doesn't prove anything, ...


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There should be no issue with the arrangement you plan to do. The only issue would be if moving the box required cutting the wall framing to allow the relocation. If the box is already protected by a GFCI outlet, that should cover any other concern that there may be.


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How your community adopts the electrical code in your area will dictate what is allowable. It is not uncommon to request and receive a variance for unusual situations.


1

I would say remove the triangle braces, an oscillating saw would work well (this is the one i own) or break them out with Channel lock (adjustable) pliers. I suppose you could drill a hole through them as well so you can get a screwdriver on them. You can glue them back in after the new sink is in. For the middle one you may be able to get a screwdriver in ...


2

It appears that this is a king stud and there is no jack stud for the opening. Did he cut into it too much? It appears that the notch is less than(?), not more than, 50% of the stud width, which is not ideal but it should be ok. Cabinets and microwave are safe. Is the wall supporting any roofing structure or second story structure? I.E. A load bearing wall?...


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