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I used a large adjustable wrench with decent sized jaws which I tightened as best I could. I found that these were less prone to twisting. Then I used a locking adjustable set of pliers (Mole grips in the UK) which I used to twist the adjustable wrench. Came off really easily with no damage to the faces of the cartridges.


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Spax makes screws that work exceptionally well for this application if they're frameless cabinets. They're called rear panel screws, 1.25" length #8s, but the head and thread is made to work well in MDF/particle board. They also make some MDF-specific threaded screws in other sizes, but the wafer head on the rear panel ones makes a nice, clean finish with ...


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Screws are a bad idea. A #8 IMHO isn't thick enough. And 2" long is about 5/8" too long if you are using the standard 3/4" melamine coated chip board. I think you need to distribute the load over more surface, or use a lot of fasteners. Remember Murphy. If you have a wall that is half an inch out of flat, you are going to try to uses these screws to ...


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I've had good luck with so-called "connecting screws". They are a two-part design, with both sides having a head. One end is like a machine screw with a pan head, the other part has a pan head, but the shaft is hollow and threaded for the opposing end to screw into. They are designed specifically for this purpose. You can get them in various lengths and ...


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In most cases those will work nicely. At times, though, drawing force is substantial. The world isn't flat and level and hardwoods can be stubborn. Feel free to use those screws, properly piloted and countersunk, but be prepared to use conventional flute-head screws (gold construction screws) behind hinges or in other hidden locations to do some heavy ...


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They exist in the UK. This remote switch enables you to test all alarms, locate an activated alarm (silences all non-activated alarms), and silence false alarms. https://www.aico.co.uk/product/ei1529rc-hard-wired-alarm-control-switch/ Any type of smoke detector is usually inappropriate for a kitchen and a heat detector is usually used, with a smoke ...


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Another alternative, since you will not likely be raising or lowering it a lot, would be to build it with a mechanism to raise and lower it that could be powered by a portable battery powered drill motor that you chuck onto a discrete fitting. The person in the attached website did it by using trailer jacks that he hid inside of wood boxes, but he was ...


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This is really close to a shopping question which is off topic. But, the term you need to look for is smart smoke detector. These are internet capable devices and some of them can be managed as an IoT device.


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Electrical "Movable using casters" instantly qualifies it as furniture, and not part of the building's structure. Heck, if it were a rental unit, you could take it with you. As for electrical to this rolling cabinet, that's a trick. It's extremely likely that a floor-wiring-based solution is going to get crunched and mashed. You would have to install a ...


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While you will likely be exempt from the requirement for counter receptacles for small appliances, provided you have those in other (fixed) areas of the kitchen, you may want to consider providing them for convenience. There are a few ways to do that. The simplest would be to use a 20A floor receptacle with a plug/cord from the island that goes to a junction ...


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The flue is just a duct, either plastic or metal, so you could create your own offset using standard fittings for the given diameter. If it's a plastic flue you can box it in. If you want an exposed metal flue you could ask someone to weld one. You can also get flexible concertina-type flues, both metal and plastic. Not as nice to look at nor as efficient ...


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Depending upon the problem and / or age, attempting to rotate the drum is the very best way to get it working again. If you let it "hum" long enough, it will trip the overload in the unit and you'd have to reset it. Kudos to you for not going that route. Use a stout piece of wood, maybe like 3 ft long, like a plunger handle to move it. If that does not ...


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Try inserting a broom stick into the disposal and try to pry the round plate connected to the motor..... this will give you more leverage that the Allen wrench.


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I have one but have to turn it off while actually cooking because it blows heat away from open pans and is enough to change the way food cooks. I think a vertical exhaust fan through a window or over the stove would work better for removing heat and smoke/odors from cooking on the stove top.


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That one may be a builders grade .99 special get a spec grade for 3$ they are heavier and you won’t have the problem any longer. In past positions I had to test outlets (hospital electrician) now they use hospital grade outlets crazy expensive but they last longer and have a higher withdraw force than new .99 specials, the spec grade have very similar ...


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Yes, any GFCI device can protect down line loads. GFCI receptacles are no exception. This requires attaching the downline hot and neutral to the LOAD terminals. This is the ONLY reason to use these terminals. Don't use them for anything else. Outlets thus protected must get a sticker"GFCI Protected" or they will fail inspection. Remember not to put ...


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It depends on how your kitchen is wired. If one breaker controls all your kitchen counter outlets, you can replace the "first" outlet with a GFCI and protect the rest of them from it. If you have two or more breakers for the kitchen counter outlets then the "first" outlet on each circuit needs to be a GFIC. you could also change the breakers for your ...


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For mine, it seems to be limescale or other mineral buildup. While throughput is no longer an issue after I soak it in vinegar/water, the mechanism that switches back to plain flow isn't working and I'm very frustrated.


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Did you check your circuit breakers to see if a circuit has tripped...? Yes indeed, receptacles ( outlets can go bad, wiring in them can come loose and well as others things.) First: Check your circuit breakers, see if any are tripped. If not... Approach with the utmost cation if you intend to remove that outlet.. FIND ( if you can ) that outlet breaker if ...


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Yes there is normally a gap between the OTR and the cabinet above it. If you review the install instructions usually the gap is 1". The gap is almost required and the typically U shaped metal mount on the back wall requires that the OTR be tilted in to be installed. The tilting then requires that both the air output and the electrical cord coming out of ...


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Yeah, that's BX/AC, so ground to the box Looking at your closeup shot, I can tell that between the fact that the cable armor is stopped by the fitting (instead of a cable jacket, which will poke out into the box through the cable clamp as a general rule), the lack of a ground wire entering the box (which rules out type MC), and the individual paper wraps ...


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In NYC, you will have 208V power. It's 3-phase, but that won't be an issue. Grounding path Through discussion, we've determined fairly conclusively that a) this complex's wiring is grounded, and b) the grounding is via conduit or AC cable jackets, NOT individually run ground wires. OP reports that his "sub?" Panel has no ground wires at all, yet ...


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