27

When buying castors, they're generally marketed as a set that can carry a total load. ie a set of 4 '200 lb' castors are meant for an object that weighs under 200 lbs. I'd simplify your problem by estimating then doubling that. If an average person can lift 50 lbs, is the kitchen island something 2 people can lift? Get a set of 200 lb castors. Would it ...


17

Loosen the center screw and then pull (or pry if it's stuck) around the edges. These plug into both outlets and can be fairly tight. I recommend you shut off power at the service panel before trying this for safety.


16

Yes, the most common solution is to sell your US appliances and buy new in India. The difficulties and expense of getting transformers etc and making it impossible for others to connect the wrong things is not worth the time or expense. But your money your choice, Iā€™m basing this on the decisions others have made... And I do have a 230v to 110v transformer ...


11

How to weigh the kitchen island: Get four bathroom scales. You almost certainly have one already; borrow the rest from friends. Position the scales under the island in the (approximate) position that you intend to fit the castors. You may need to place blocks of wood on the scales so that the island doesn't hide the dial. Read the weight that each castor ...


8

In NYC, you will have 208V power. It's 3-phase, but that won't be an issue. Grounding path Through discussion, we've determined fairly conclusively that a) this complex's wiring is grounded, and b) the grounding is via conduit or AC cable jackets, NOT individually run ground wires. OP reports that his "sub?" Panel has no ground wires at all, yet ...


6

In most cases those will work nicely. At times, though, drawing force is substantial. The world isn't flat and level and hardwoods can be stubborn. Feel free to use those screws, properly piloted and countersunk, but be prepared to use conventional flute-head screws (gold construction screws) behind hinges or in other hidden locations to do some heavy ...


6

The problem is that your castors not only have static forces, they also have load forces (someone sitting on it) and dynamic forces of rolling it around. If you've ever pushed a rolling cabinet around, you've experienced the "THUD" when it suddenly hits something and stops abruptly. That creates dynamic forces on the cabinet that can be even more than ...


6

A photo would be helpful, but from your description it sounds like you need a box extension. This extends the box so your receptacles stand proud (above) of the surface and will allow the cover to fit properly. I use these quite often after a tile job where they did not reset the boxes prior to tiling. If it is a slight setback you can loosen the receptacles ...


5

I would shut off the circuit, then test the sockets are all dead (test all, I'm paranoid.) Then get cleaning with degreaser and warm water. The upper slope especially looks like it has caked-on grease and oils from cooking, which will have wicked inside the fitting and "glued" the whole thing together. It might help to use warm air from a hairdryer to ...


5

The maximum depth allowed by Code on a non-combustible surface is 1/4", if deeper you need something like a box extender. If your problem is just that the wings of the device miss the tile but you are still within legal clearance you can use a leveling clip or caterpillar shims.


4

Yeah, that's BX/AC, so ground to the box Looking at your closeup shot, I can tell that between the fact that the cable armor is stopped by the fitting (instead of a cable jacket, which will poke out into the box through the cable clamp as a general rule), the lack of a ground wire entering the box (which rules out type MC), and the individual paper wraps ...


4

Shims are ordinarily left to just friction for anchoring. In your case, even if you only glue them to the subfloor they're unlikely to move. You could certainly also glue them to the cabinet base. I wouldn't bother trying to screw them in, though. That's overkill alongside construction adhesive and will probably result in a bunch of split wood and swearing....


4

If the outlets serve a countertop then they need to be GFCI protected. The 6' distance you refer to is for sinks not installed in kitchens.


4

You are correct, the issue here is the cord and plug for the dishwasher running through the floor. 400.8 Uses Not Permitted. Unless specifically permitted in 400.7, flexible cords and cables shall not be used for the following: ... (2) Where run through holes in walls, structural ceilings, suspended ceilings, dropped ceilings, or floors ...


4

10/3 cable absolutely requires a 30A breaker or less. Period. NEC 240.4(B), which overrides any number anywhere else in Code (though all those other places also limit NM/UF/Romex to 30A). You will need to review your range's UL-approved instructions to see whether it "recommends" or "requires" 8/3 and a 40A breaker. If it "requires", then pull 8/3 (leave ...


3

I have one but have to turn it off while actually cooking because it blows heat away from open pans and is enough to change the way food cooks. I think a vertical exhaust fan through a window or over the stove would work better for removing heat and smoke/odors from cooking on the stove top.


3

You should be fine If this breaker truly is only serving the hood (I'd double check that with a plug-in radio in each of the kitchen outlets with this breaker off), then you'll be fine with putting the microwave/hood on there. If there are kitchen outlets on this breaker, then I would limit the input (nameplate) power of the microwave/hood to 1.2kW (which ...


3

Yes there is normally a gap between the OTR and the cabinet above it. If you review the install instructions usually the gap is 1". The gap is almost required and the typically U shaped metal mount on the back wall requires that the OTR be tilted in to be installed. The tilting then requires that both the air output and the electrical cord coming out of ...


3

There are no valves in that picture.


3

You can normally connect 2 ovens on 1 breaker per the NEC but the manufacturer instructions over ride the NEC per 110.4.B , listed or labeled equipment shall be installed in accordance with any instructions included in the listing or labeling. This means you have to follow the manufacturers instructions. I agree with @JReaf that the control cycling of the ...


3

If you are talking about a Refrigerator that runs on LP gas the tank needs to be away from the fridge because the fridge has an open flame inside, on a hot day it is possible that the LP tank can vent and release some gas, also when filling or changing tanks their is a small loss of gas, the open flame could ignite the gas and this is the reason the fridge ...


3

You can look up NEC at NFPA.org- free registration required. Comments in parens are my rewording. 334.10 Uses Permitted Type NM ('Romex')....shall be permitted in 1 and 2 family dwellings, and multifamily dwellings of types III, IV and V construction (and other buildings, but must be concealed) A "For both exposed and concealed work in normally dry ...


3

So I noticed on part 125 the latchboard the latch "ramps" appeared to have worn down a bit which might cause the switches to not all flip in the appropriate sequence. So I purchased and installed a replacement. When I installed the new latchboard (and new relays) I made sure the latchboard was firmly screwed to the frame. It's possible if the latchboard ...


3

The white material that is flaking off looks like an insulation/sound deadening coat applied by the sink manufacturer. It wasn't supposed to come off. Unfortunately, I don't think there is a quick & easy solution. The white material looks friable (it breaks up into dust). I see the white dust on your garbage disposal unit. If the sink is over a couple ...


3

You could do it. You'd need a small portable tile saw and would have to very carefully cut the tiles exactly flush with the countertop. This would be very hard to do because you'd have to reach to the back of the countertop to do the cutting and would need perfect control of the saw to avoid scratching the countertop. If you were that skilled, because of ...


3

There is no requirement for a back splash behind an oven. Period. I buy a lot of houses with just drywall and painted. To add tile there is very little prep work that you have to do to the wall. Basically you just want to scruff it up a little if tiling with mortar and if using the peel and stick, a rough sanding and cleaning up after works. ...


3

You're dealing with some major renovations. I don't think we would be able to answer that accurately just by looking at pictures. The easiest part would be rerouting the electric cables. Junction boxes could be mounted to the joists but the boxes would have to be accessible forever. The plex plumbing would be a nightmare and the drain piping almost ...


3

Borax is a great substitute for TSP. Mixed with water, it is a very good degreaser. Just scrub your walls with it and let it dry completely. Any ammonia-based cleanser will also do the job. With peel and stick tiles read and follow all the manufacturer instructions accurately.


3

You are correct, the only purpose of the two nails were to align the cabinet edges together. The screws in the back panel is what holds the cabinet up and provide the load support.


3

Your drain might be backing up , a 1-1/2 or 2ā€ sink dumping into a 4ā€ drain should not have any back pressure . I see your arrows but can not tell why it would leak there , I would try a silicone sealer . If there is not a vent close to the sink this could cause issues but at the point where the size jumps would be a new one for me. If you run water for a ...


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