23

It is a problem, and you should fix it because small leaks tend to become bigger leaks. You can't rely on hard water deposits to seal things, and drips can cause corrosion and damage to your kitchen. Even if it stays a slow drip you'll always have it at the back of your mind. This is a case where it pays to do it right at the beginning. It sounds like you ...


17

As suggested by @Ecnerwal, I wrote to Custom Building Products' customer support. Got a reply within 15 minutes: The isolated areas look to be a bit of sealer residue that might not have been wiped or rubbed dry with dry paper towels after each application within 3 minutes of each application? If so, this can be safely scrubbed off at any time, using a ...


14

You can put the dishwasher wherever you want. You will have to provide it with water and a drain that meets code - and it's not at all likely that you can run 17 feet to join the sink drain while meeting code. So you'll have to arrange plumbing to serve the water input and drain output needs of the dishwasher where you want to put it, independent of the sink....


12

It appears to me that this cable has two insulated conductors for the two hot legs plus an uninsulated conductor to be used as a ground, i.e., it does not have a third insulated cable to be used as a neutral. The cable is wired to the receptacle using the uninsulated conductor as a neutral. This is not allowed by code. This cable can legally supply 240 V, ...


10

Go for it, for now at least... You appear to have at least 6AWG if not 4AWG aluminum present there, so you will have no trouble with a full-sized range circuit using the existing 40A breaker and a NEMA 10-50R receptacle. Since this is aluminum wire, though, you'll need a Cu/Al rated receptacle, and also to make sure you use anti-oxidant grease on the ...


10

Squeezing the extractor duct to fit into the hood shouldn't cause an issue unless you bent the fan housing and it's binding. Check that the fan spins freely and also check your electrical connections, one might have vibrated loose. Check the fan to switch connectors as well, they are usually spade connectors and could have started working loose during ...


9

Having multiple circuits in one box as fine, as long as you don't cross the streams! What you propose (i.e. having a 15A circuit share a box with a 20A circuit) is entirely fine and normal. There is one thing you'll want to be careful about though, and that's not crossing the streams; while you'll need to connect all the grounding conductors together, you ...


8

Wow! Not how I ever installed any backsplash. I would have applied a small bead of silicone to the bottom edge of the BS, install it on the counter top and push down and hold down until dry (sticks work, weight plates) and scrape off any silicone that squeezed out so all you see is a tiny or no seam. I would not apply it after the splash is installed, it ...


7

Pretty common practice for most trades not to clean after themselves. Even the trades that do clean after themselves I have a hard time imagining cleaning the underside of the slab. My experience is the same as yours. If you touch the underside of the slab you are likely to come away with dust - unless you personally cleaned it. I wouldn't worry about it. ...


7

Did you use all the grout at once? Some grouts aren't dry mixed well at at the factory. If you read the fine print it will say to mix the dry grout BEFORE adding water to. So if you do it in batches and didn't mix it, you'll get uneven results. When you wash it, it's just getting wet and hiding the problem.


6

Aside from what else is going on, this is a goobed up mess. The #1 problem is that a junction box can't just have a hole bashed in it by smashing a rock against it. The cable entering it needs to have a proper cable clamp, which means the box needs a proper knockout. The cable is #4 SE cable, and that cable can do 2 interesting things: First, that bare wire ...


6

Your options: come up from below or down from above You have two choices as to supplying the receptacles for this peninsula: either you can come up from below into a wiring chase between the two sets of cabinets as SteveSh describes, or come down from above using pendant techniques. Both work by Code, but have different caveats and costs. Note, by the way, ...


6

The original connection to the mains was made according to the highlighted scheme below, 400V 2L-1N, corresponding to the two-phase set-up that is very common in the Netherlands. Actually, the common 400V 2 phase setup in the Netherlands is 2L-2N with the second neutral on what you indicated as the L3 pin. And it is not even a proper 2-phase, but rather 2 ...


6

The breaker trips will not be affected, in any way, by changing the receptacles. 15A receptacles are 100% code compliant on a 20A circuit, as long as there are at least 2 - and a duplex counts as 2. The only reason to change the receptacles is you have actual 20A appliances to plug in. I have used some UPS (battery backup) and some big copiers that have 20A ...


5

First the breaker must match your panel (Square D in a Square D panel; Eaton BR in a Challenger panel; sometimes it's tricky). Then, the breaker must be the correct ampacity for the wire. So if the wire is #14 use a 15A breaker. Do not use a 20A breaker unless all wire in the circuit is known to be #12 copper or #10 aluminum. If it is feasible for you to ...


5

The dishwasher gap needs no special support. But it usually requires a brace to attach the dishwasher's tabs to, which is then covered by a trim. Install the lower cabinets, sink cabinet(s), the pantry cabinet and the fridge panel..etc. If you also install the upper cabinets, that's fine. Leave the gaps for the dishwasher and stove. Install a dishwasher ...


5

The 11 GFCI receptacles is rather peculiar. Indeed, fewer GFCI receptacles could have been used. The extras can be eliminated as I describe in this Q&A. However, your claim that "all your kitchen receptacles are on one circuit" is rather unlikely. For decades, NEC has required at least two circuits for kitchen counter receptacles. So don't ...


5

Sure, lots of people think the same thing. "Neutral is just neutral, who cares? It's all the same back at the panel." But we're not back at the panel. We're here. So it matters. It sounds like they used 4-core+ground cable to bring 2 hots (black brown) and 2 neutrals (blue gray) from the panel to here. A little odd, but OK. if the Perilex system ...


5

That photo will be a huge help. First, recognize that electrical boxes are nearly always mounted to wall studs. Wall studs are nearly always placed at regular intervals -- for example, 16 inches on center. (It's also common that there might be a window in the wall above a sink. This means extra studs in the wall but they're going to be at the edges of the ...


4

That cable appears to be type SE cable, and so it would be allowed by the exception to NEC 250.140 to replace the 30A receptacle with a 3-wire NEMA 10-50R. Below is the code section you can read. It seems to me your existing installation fits the conditions, even condition (3) about the uninsulated cable. It would be better to upgrade to a 4-wire, but not ...


4

You won't be able to tell from these blueprints because these are the electrical plans and not the structural.


4

The number of NM cables you need won't fit in a sanely sized pipe... and UF cable makes the situation much worse because it is even wider and flatter than NM. (unfortunately this is outdoors, and "liquidtight" conduit isn't). When going through conduit, cable counts same as a round wire of the large dimension. You're not allowed to piece the ...


4

You run individual THHN wires in conduit, not NM or UF cables The first mistake most DIYers make when they first approach conduit is trying to stuff NM or UF down it. Instead, what you're supposed to use in conduit is individual wires of a type called THHN. These are usually stranded, making them much more flexible than NM or UF cable, and also take up ...


4

All junction boxes need to be accessible. Period. Don't mess with that rule, it's a very important one. If the junction boxes meet or exceed the size required for "box fill" (there are calculators on the web, if the one you stumble on at first is not to your liking, choose another, many work fine/easily, or you can read the tables and do the calcs ...


4

It's no surprise that your new receptacle trips the GFI. It's bridging across from the Line terminals (which you've labelled 'Feed') over to the Load terminals. The GFI is doing its job by detecting an imbalance in the current flowing thru the Load and tripping off. First thing you need to do is decide if you want your new receptacles to be protected by the ...


4

The secrets of cooktops Most cooktops sold in Europe support being fed using either a single phase or two phases. The way this works is that internally the cooktop is split into two halves, so that one "L" terminal feeds say the left two zones and the other "L" terminal supplies the right ones. This holds for both traditional and ...


4

You can't. Any circuit which serves kitchen receptacles must serve only kitchen receptacles, or a gas stove, or a clock. No other uses are allowed. Any circuit which serves kitchen receptacles must also be 20A. There may also be a code violation in removing the dishwasher switch. What you could do, instead, is replace the dishwasher switch with a GFCI ...


4

TL;DR That's the way it is supposed to work. There are some other options now, such as induction cooktops, but for a long time the only two options available for cooktops (whether standalone or, as in your range, together with an oven) were: Natural Gas (many can be converted to propane, but that is a minor difference) Electric Coils Gas cooktops have a ...


4

They mount on the wall (solidly into framing) and hooks on the back of the sink catch the pocket at the top of the bracket, typically. Gravity (which there is plenty of with a cast iron sink) does the rest. It should be more obvious looking at the back the matching sink.


4

Looks like a pretty normal rivet-and-washer (or rivet-and-burr) joint. Careful work with with an anvil (or anvil-substitute, such as a sledgehammer head) and a ball-peen hammer (moderately small) will tighten it up. Support one side on the anvil, and tap the other with the ball-peen hammer (or, I suppose, some other sort of hammer, but the ball-peen is ...


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