6

EMT is definitely an awesome way to do it. I do 99% of my work in EMT. However, you have to follow a few rules. One of them is "No more than four" circuits. If your service is 120V/240V split-phase it's that simple. However if you're in 3-phase land (120/208V), then the rule is "No More Than Three" if you have two or more 120/208 ...


5

Know your appliances Every one of your appliances has a nameplate or something stating its power usage. You are looking for any of the following: Amps (typically 5-13) Watts (typically 200-1500) VA (typically 200-1500) If you get watts or VA, divide by 120. That gives us amps. Expect most of your kitchen heat-making appliances to be 1500W, or 12.5 amps. ...


4

The burners on stoves are either on or off, there's no "variable" resistance in them. The "variable" part comes from the switch that has a bi-metal switch that varies the amount of time the burner is on. At low temperatures the switch opens fast so the burner doesn't get too hot. When you set the switch for high temperatures, the bi-metal ...


4

Conduit provides expandability One of the banes of amateur chefs that we have seen over and over again on this site is having too much kitchen equipment and not enough juice available to make good use of it. The Code-minimum of two 20A small appliance circuits is good for well, about two kitchen appliances, give or take one depending on how they are mapped ...


2

It may not be a matter of where, but of what. WD-40 isn't a great lubricant in some cases. It's very light and may not work on the nylon parts. It may also dissolve any actual grease that was present. Maybe try something with Teflon, lithium, or silicone, or use basic 3-in-1 household oil.


2

I'd presume that by "drywall shims" you mean pieces of drywall to bring the surface out to the level of the plaster. In that case, your two options are essentially the same thing, and, I think, a great idea. I'd suggest, though, that before you start down that path, you measure the thickness of the plaster & lath from the stud face. You may be ...


2

There are two primary reasons to use conduit: Fire protection/prevention and future wiring. If neither are concerns for you, don't bother. Here in Minnesota, conduit in single-family homes is all but unheard of. I can see it becoming code eventually if evidence accumulates that it's worth the loss of life and property it may prevent.


1

should I cut the fiberboard up to the cabinets as close as possible and butt the new cement board up to the cut and tile over it (will that cause issue with the tile over the seam?) As close as possible is fine, and even an inch or so will be fine, especially for tiles that large. The only problem i would try to avoid is having the grout seam fall on, or ...


1

Years ago handle ties were not required. They have been for decades , if you think it’s is a multi wire turn off both breakers verify both hots in your box are dead, you can open your breaker panel and most of the time NMB or Romex is used. There will be a red on 1 breaker a black on the other going to a cable with a ground and a neutral, that would be 100% ...


1

It's pretty much all dependent on wattage For the five kitchen appliances (and one lighting system) described in your post, the answer boils down entirely to wattage/amperage draw, as there are no specific requirements in the NEC for any of them to be on dedicated circuits; the fridge could be on a small appliance (kitchen countertop receptacle) branch ...


1

how about measuring the height, width and length of the bottom of the sink (and of course the height of a plastic container which is used in the sink to wash dishes), then finding a flat rectangular piece of plastic with that width and length, but the height will be the height of the sink minus the height of the dishwashing container. just measured for mine. ...


1

Hey below is the general home DIY recommendation for cleaning kitchen cabinets without loosing its shiny and glossy effect, this is what even I do at my place. Consolidate a spurt of Dawn dish cleaner/soap into a bucket of hot water, technically add half teaspoon / 8 cups of water, you can use dipped into solution scotch brite heavy duty scrub sponge for ...


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