37

The work is solid with a few exceptions. Yes, that's too short. You should be leaving 9-12 inches. The legal minimum is 6" past the clamp, or able to reach 3" beyond the finished wall surface. It can seem cluttery, but cluttery is good. Are you using a book on electrical? The book would tell you this. People learning electrical work best when they ...


21

I'm no electrician, but at first glance I would say two things: Ground the box itself. That ensures that there's no chance the box itself can become energized, because if a hot wire ever touched the box, it would trip the breaker. Unlikely situation, but I always do that when I'm working with metal boxes just to have some peace of mind. You should be able ...


16

It looks like an inline switch to me, which is usually indicated by a mark on the wire. Are there any black markings (Eg sharpie or electrical tape) on the white wire? You should be able to wire in your fixture to the old wires exactly as is.


13

According to the National Electrical Code (NEC), there are only two factors that limit you. Conductor box fill If you're working with standard sized boxes, you can use Table 314.16(A) to determine the number of conductors allowed in a box. If you're using non-standard boxes, you'll have to make the calculations yourself. Basically, it works like this. ...


8

The junction is not to code because it would need to be made in a box. The wire is wrapped for a mechanical connection but I was taught 7 turns for a tap with old knob and tube, and without even counting we can see the insulation is burned. this happens when there is a poor connection. The best option would be to purchase two construction boxes boxes and ...


6

You'll need a box, and a pretty chunky one at that Splicing wire this large is indeed done with insulated mechanical splice connectors like the one you linked -- you will need one per wire, and a torque screwdriver or wrench, marked and calibrated in inch-pounds, to install them properly. As to containing the splices, you will need something larger than a ...


6

Modern recessed lights have junction boxes built in. Similarly on a new work recessed fixture You are free to daisy-chain other lights or receptacles, so long as you connect properly and do not exceed the number of wires for the size of the built in box. A chart to calculate this can be found here.


6

A large enough junction box First, you are going to need a very large junction box to do all this splicing. Let's count conductors. Two /2 cables and one /3 cable = 7 conductors to splice. Plus the 7 conductors they'll meet in this box. Plus 1 conductor count to cover all ground wires Plus 1 conductor count to cover all cable clamps Plus 2 conductor ...


6

First, anytime you delete a receptacle or switch, you must review the minimum requirements for receptacles and switches. You must not kill the only light switch in the room, for instance, and you can't fall below the minimum spec for receptacle positions -- notably, any point along a wall must be (along-the-wall) within 6' of a receptacle. 12 AWG cable is ...


5

Huge problems with this. Gigantic. If a breaker trips, you'll be backfeeding the tripped circuit. "What could go wrong?" So your machine is loaded between circuits A and B, and SNAP! Circuit A breaker trips. Your machine stops working, of course. But what happens to the other loads on circuit A? They're dead right? No sir, they are not. Power ...


5

Do not do this with your idea to make or get some type of Y-adapter. It is just too crazy dangerous to do this. In addition the fact that you have to ask this question here to learn about it is a demonstration that this is not a good idea. There are many factors that have to be considered and even in a few comments under your question not all of those ...


5

In addition to everything else everyone's said, if you don't have any spare length in the wires, it limits your ability to make changes to your wiring later. You would struggle for example to bring in a 4th wire, and you've no spare length to correctly wire the earth wires to the metal box. You may also need a little slack if you later adjust another ...


5

Yes, every box requires a cover plate. You can't have a cavity with individual wires and wirenuts enjoying a view of the attic. And a steel box needs a steel cover plate. Blank cover plates are readily available for less than a buck. There are only a few styles and sizes and I just keep one or two on hand.


5

There's nothing in National Electrical Code about removing abandoned electrical cable. If it's communication, television, radio, etc. cable, you have to remove the accessible portion of the cables. If it's wire in a raceway (conduit, cables trays, etc.), you do have to remove it. Connecting the ungrounded (hot), grounded (neutral), and grounding ...


4

Yes, it must be in a junction box. There are splice connectors available for installation in a space where a junction box is not possible, but those splice connectors are explicitly rated for such a purpose; the connector you have proposed is not. Putting a junction box in an attic is not that big of a deal. Just do that.


3

You can't, but no need. If you're referring to the Tyco Electronics Romex splice kits, yes, they make those for 3-wire w/ground as well as 2-wire w/ ground. If you mean some other splice method, you have to read its instructions for whether it is suitable in-wall. As far as I know the Tyco is the only one that is UL-listed for buried in-wall splicing. ...


3

There are a couple of reasons why electrical codes insist that connections are always inside a box, and that the box is always accessible. 1) The likelihood of a failure inside the cable itself is vanishingly small. Any failures will almost certainly be at connections, and you need access to correct them. 2) Any connection is liable to have more ...


2

You asked two questions, the first of which has been fully answered (is it acceptable for code). The second question was about safety. Speaking as an electrical engineer, a proper splice is perfectly safe. This could be accomplished with soldering and shrink wrap, correct use of twist-on caps with proper strain relief, or a variety of other splicing ...


2

I would use a sharp knife, a so called utility knife, if I had one handy, but would try my moderately well sharpened pocket knife if that was all I had. EDIT It may be that all one has to do is to pierce a "ring" with a knife or even a flat blade screwdriver and then pulling propagates the tear as the inside is pulled out. EDIT2 The fact that the ring ...


2

I have a 1950's house Pennsylvania (USA). I have found some strange wiring like you describe. Undo the wire nut, separate the wires so nothing is shorting or touching, and turn the power back on. Then see what doesn't work. I have found the often the "extra" wire is feeding power or ground to an outlet or another light. In my cases there was 3 strand ...


2

I am a huge fan of steel boxes for things like this for a couple of reasons. First, they contain arc faults very well, they won't melt or burn through like plastic, and if anything will help the breaker trip if a hot wire comes loose. Second, they solve a problem the last guy had: finding a proper cover for the box. Blank cover plates are perfectly ...


2

Yes, this is very bad Bangkok-tier work, just hack-n-slash it in. Here are the rules with boxes: Every splice must happen inside a junction box. The cable sheath must come into the junction box at least 1/4" past the cable clamp. The individual wires must be 6" long past the point of entry (including sheath). Now in a case like this, either fixing ...


1

No, all the conductors need to be part of the same assembly. A 4-hole version is NSi Model # NMS-3, they are about $15 from Home Depot.


1

If the circuit is 20A then you need to use 12-2. Eight current carrying conductors plus ground wires would require a minimum 20.25 cubic inch box without a receptacle, 24.75 with a receptacle. All ground wires need to be connected together, and to the receptacle if you keep it. A tan wirenut (Ideal 341) can hold up to 4 #12's (or an orange Wago), a red ...


1

I have done this before, and it worked perfectly. All of the other offered advice in the comments are valid, as this can be dangerous if someone besides you will be around that could be handling your cabling. As mentioned previously, you would have to source your current from two different outlets that are out of phase with each other, and the total ...


1

Clamps are required to protect the cable from damage, I like raco brand insiders because they are quick and inexpensive, there are also 2 screw cable clamps that are commonly used to protect cables like T&B nc301 , these are easily found at plumbing and electric shops or big box stores.


1

First, you make sure this thing is actually certified for use in mains wiring. If it came from ebay, amazon or alibaba/aliexpress, it's not. Then, you obey the labeling and instructions that come with it. It can't pass certification without instructions, because certification isn't for all uses, only for the methods of use described in the instructions....


1

I would use a step drill bit similar to this one. It will allow you to drill whatever size hole you need for the appropriate size connector. Cheap Harbor Freight Bit


1

The answer below is based on ALL outlets showing 150V. If it is only a problem on one circuit as ok indicated in another question then it is an internal problem and NOT a serious utility problem. Problem with neutral service coming from the service drop/meter Check to make sure you show no voltage between ground & neutral. If ground & neutral are ...


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