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Since the floor is needing to be replaced with plywood to get a good base, I would remove the rest of the existing subfloor and plane down the high spot, if it is truly high. Over time. joists will develop a sag in the middle, so where though it may be truly high in the area you suggest, it may actually be level with the rest of the floor at bearing walls. ...


1

Search for ceiling fan joist hangers - sound like that would be perfect for what you need.


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Like others have said you definitely need to re-enforce the trusses. You will also likely need to add additional trusses. The maximum unsupported span for drywall is 24". It's hard to tell but looking at the wall assuming the studs are on 16" spacing it looks like the trusses are spaced further apart than 24".


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No, you would need to reframe the ceiling with timbers that are continuous and rated to bear the load of a ceiling, rather than simple rafter ties. Timbers that are butted together like that are in tension - their job is to stop the roof from spreading outwards. Adding the weight of quite a significant amount of drywall underneath would make them sag ...


2

Don't notch the flange of an I-joist But don't panic! There's likely good news below too. The flanges - that's the top and bottom pieces of an I-joist - take a significant proportion of the actual load. Cutting them makes a quite dramatic difference in the load bearing capability of the joist, according to manufacturer load tables like the ones below. I-...


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If you only replace the old tub with the same, I would have told you not to worry too much if you can bridge the notched wood with the same kind (the cord is under compression, as opposed to tension, which can be a serious matter). But I don't think your floor was designed for the Jacuzzi. You should obtain a nod from a structural engineer before proceeding ...


2

While your approach is fine, but I prefer to add an edge beam as shown red in the sketch below. Then you only need to run the diagonal in between the beams.


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Are the posts on some sort of concrete foundation? If the posts are just sitting on dirt then they will eventually rot and I'd be worried about how much weight they can support. This is particularly an issue given the slope. Even if you don't want to go to the hassle of a foundation it might be worth sitting the posts on concrete pavers or blocks. The other ...


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Yes they should have been. You might be OK if you put a moisture barrier under them and give them a few coatings of a waterproofing sealer. Since they are not in contact with the ground, you should be OK for a while.


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If the existing furring strips are nailed in ,i would would try to add a 1 5/8" screw on at least every other joist for addition weight support


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Stud finders are usually unable to find wood joists under thick wood floors. They are for drywall. Friction noises depend where noise really comes from, not where you step. In one house with plywood then oak hardwood, it was the joist & X pieces . Polyurethane tube of sub-floor adhesive to an open basement ceiling joist edges applied like sealant fixed ...


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if the wall parallel to the joists is not over a joist it is not a structural wall, and so your blocking plan would work to support the wall you will probably need further blocking between the blocking to support the edges of your new floor, unless you plan to remove the remnants and install your new flooring under the walls.


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If I understand your question correctly, the problem is that the green highlighted double joist is going to land on the joint between your two boards making up the 22' ledger attached to the house. I see a couple of options: So long as the fasteners (ledger to wall) aren't in the way of the joist hangers, have the ledger joint right there and use a standard ...


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