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1

I've heard that I can glue/screw a 2x4 to the bottom of this joist to make it an upside down T shape. Will this restore enough tensile strength? Otherwise, does this need to be fully-sistered (with the pipe relocated)? How urgent is this repair? It's not urgent. You think your notch is problematic? Look at this guy's project! I've seen entire ...


10

Good on you for leveling up your knowledge and learning where not to drill or saw on joists. On that same note, here's an excellent summary from BuildingAdvisor titled Guide to Notching and Boring Joists: Don’t make any holes with a diameter greater than 1/3 the depth of a joist. No holes closer than 2 inches to the top or bottom edge. No holes closer than ...


5

You’re lucky, sort of... First, the joists are 1 5/8” x 7 1/2” not 1 1/2” x 7 1/4” if the house was built in the 1940’s. Second, the joists are not Redwood (thank goodness) they’re Douglas fir. Third, I’d classify them as No. 1 or Select Structural grade. (There’s only one grade better: Dense Select Structural.) Fourth, those hairline horizontal lines ...


5

These are larger than 2x6 joists. That plays in your favor. A notch in a 2x6 is disastrous. The beams look OK for now. The cracks are horizontal so they're not concerning. Those can be caused by the drying of the boards or settling, and they could predate the notches. Your best bet is to reroute the pipes and full sister the beam . It has the least ...


0

Using 2"x12" spaced at 16" or even 24" would eliminate any potential sag. The 2"x12" would then help support your rafters using the vertical 2x4's rather than having your rafters support your joists. My home is built using 2"x12" ceiling joists and all the joist joints are on a load bearing wall. This home is 20 years old and has zero sag in a 20' span. The ...


1

Generally speaking, holes are usually OK, and notches are not. Notches are like ripping the edge of a piece of paper, which creates a weak point for potential fractures. As noted, the notch on the far right is nearly halfway through the beam, which means you'll have to sister it to repair it (assuming it can be done at all, might want to consult an engineer)....


1

Fortunately, the abused floor joist still looks straight. If it happens to be sitting on a foundation/basement wall, it shouldn't be an issue. If it is not supported underneath, it would be a good idea to place a post under it. I wouldn't let the same electrician work on the house anymore.


2

Any kind of insulation will help us would consider boxing by in the space also, if in an elevated area we used to have trouble with swallows building their mud nests in areas like that so boxing them was a must, (I don’t see that issue here but we had it just north of you). But insulation will help.


1

I used "deck" screws in my deck in which most connections are at 45 degrees ; no problem after 20+ years. The few places I used hangers , they rusted away so I put in stainless deck screws , 5 years -no problem.


3

Of course your deck is governed by the Code. The Code regulates all construction, unless it’s non-structural, (i.e.: carpet, paint, etc.) All work (projects) are reviews for 1) building compliance (height, size, guardrails, stairs, etc.), 2) fire code (setbacks, etc.), 3) structural, 4) energy use, if applicable Under “structural”, Table 2304.9.1 ...


2

2x6 framing would be strong enough, but I have a couple of concerns. Racking - I think you should put a cross brace on the back (2x4 would be fine) Mechanical fasteners - for the elevated frame, you definitely want to use either lags or structural screws to attach it to the verticals. The rest can be nails and/or construction screws (largest that don't ...


0

I once built a similar structure. 2x6 is more than adequate.


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