New answers tagged

1

Yes, you can use spacers. Even vertical 2x4 blocks every 12-16" would do. Just fasten it all together very well with 16d nails, construction screws, or bolts run through. You can also probably trim back the interfering joist to the center of the bearing wall, giving you half the depth for your new joist. Or, replace the joist completely. A temporary ...


8

Looking for "sanded" plywood and check the specification for the panel you are looking to purchase. This one is a 4x8x3/4 from Menards. https://www.menards.com/main/building-materials/panel-products/tile-backer-board/4-x-8-acx-sanded-plywood/1251420/p-1444425371729.htm


2

I suggest running a 2x header between the joist and level with the junction box. Then hanging the fixture on the eyebolts that fastened on the 2x. It will be much sturdy.


7

You could attach blocking to the joists on both sides of the existing electrical box and bracing, etc. By attaching the blocking vertically, you will maximize the weight capacity, but by attaching horizontally you can provide a larger area to "hit" with the mounting hardware. Both orientations should support the weight adequately. Sections of 2x4 ...


2

This is what I would do personally: I would get a 2x8 or larger, cut it to fit the width, cut a notch to fit the box, the fasten that between the joists. Make sure you cut the width of that to fit as snugly as possible without having to excessively force it in, gentle tapping with your fist is ideal. Put 3 or so screws such as these DeckMate screws on each ...


4

Update after seeing the fixture image: There's no need to bolt the box to the support framing other than to secure it in position. Nothing hangs from the box (so it doesn't even need to be fan-rated). I would still run the 2x10 over the box, and I'd add blocking on each side of the box to bring it down flush with the adjacent joists. This will give you solid ...


1

Solid wood is not an appropriate substrate for tile, no matter how well it's screwed. It just moves too much with the seasons. Even basic plywood is "engineered" in the sense that the plies are oriented at right angles, creating stability. The alternative is to screw it all down, then lay plywood or cement board over the top, but that usually ...


1

Lose the middle beam If the joists need support in the middle use bricks or masonry units or something else that won't rot if it's partially buried. if you need to prevent the joists from twisting use blocking between them.


5

Given that you don't have joist hangers, the solution seems clear to me. Set your three posts under three beams. Lay your joists across the beams. __________________________________________________ | |_____________| |______________| |_____________| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |...


4

Go to the library and check out a book on building decks. There are commonly accepted specifications and construction methods for decks, and a good book will walk you through the design and building processes. Also, local building codes may have something to say about the construction of a deck.


3

How about adding an option (5). The thinking is to evenly distribute the floor load to the edge beams, so the edge beams will be stressed less and deflect less than a concentrated load from the center joist. Since it is now stiffer and the space between joists is much smaller for the deck board to bridge over, the board can be thinner, and directly nailed ...


3

Agree with @r13 . Joists almost always are necessary to stop the roof from pushing the walls outward. If you dislike them, consider "scissors joists" which tie the walls to the roof joists on the opposite side of the peak. This gives you a slightly lower cathedral ceiling but eliminates the joists/beams running in mid-air.


2

It's now fixed! We ended up doing it mostly the same way as suggested in @isherwood's answer, but with some differences. The sistered joists were connected using staggered 12M coach bolts, toothed timber connectors, and strong wood glue. We used screws to temporarily hold the sisters in place to drill holes for the bolts, then unscrewed them to put in the ...


0

The only way to truly do something like this is to forget about steel. Has iron and rust. As well as stainless steel develop blotchy rust spots from acidic rain. Aluminum is a better alternative. But slightly more costly. Mixing of two metals can cause huge corrosion on both. So if using aluminum stick with aluminum screws but they break easily... Could do ...


13

Background: My father was a structural engineer in the steel building industry and did exactly what you are asking for - calculate the statics of buildings and other large constructions, dimension struts, bolts and so on. Is this all completely hopeless or is there a way to finish the construction in steel? Yes, this is completely hopeless. You will not, ...


28

There are loads of pre-designed steel building shells out there. Use one. These are offered by commercial building companies for farm and industrial buildings. They have gotten a family of designs pre-approved, and they pre-manufacture all the required beam sections. You take one of their stock widths, and any length you want as long as it's a multiple of X ...


2

TL;DR Attach a 2x6 flat across the rafters and use oversized eye hooks and washers to secure into the flat board. If the porch swing will be perpendicular to the rafters then attach a 2x6 perpendicularly on the rafters which is 2-4 feet longer than the porch swing. Attach it using 2 screws per joist. Now attach eye hook bolts to the flat 2x6 using oversized ...


11

Prefab metal shed. These are popular and durable. They are used on farms and workyards everywhere. Many, many sizes and shapes are available. Quonset huts many decades old are still in service. If you want a metal building why not buy one from a company that makes and sells them. There will be people from the company available to help you put it up. ...


48

You're probably thinking of the wrong sort of metal When most people think of "metal buildings", they think of I-beams, columns, and open-web joists, as found in large-scale construction. While these are used effectively in high-rises, big-boxes, and factory buildings where structural engineers can work everything out, precalculated span and ...


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