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5

Given that you don't have joist hangers, the solution seems clear to me. Set your three posts under three beams. Lay your joists across the beams. __________________________________________________ | |_____________| |______________| |_____________| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |...


4

Go to the library and check out a book on building decks. There are commonly accepted specifications and construction methods for decks, and a good book will walk you through the design and building processes. Also, local building codes may have something to say about the construction of a deck.


3

How about adding an option (5). The thinking is to evenly distribute the floor load to the edge beams, so the edge beams will be stressed less and deflect less than a concentrated load from the center joist. Since it is now stiffer and the space between joists is much smaller for the deck board to bridge over, the board can be thinner, and directly nailed ...


3

You could add PT 2x4 to each side of the 4x4 post cut to the length between your 2x6 top/bottom trim boards, then screw your 2x6s into the end-grain of the 2x4s. This would give you a 90° screw connection, but honestly, toe-screwing them in (from the bottom side so water doesn't collect in the holes) would probably be sufficient. If you're feeling fancy, you ...


1

Your method of doing the sides sounds rife with potential to tip the tool and throw the registration of the fence off. The ergonomics are all set up for the cuts to be "pushing in from the side" with the registration fence of the tool resting on top in both cases. Standing the tool up and pushing down means gravity is no longer holding the ...


1

Lose the middle beam If the joists need support in the middle use bricks or masonry units or something else that won't rot if it's partially buried. if you need to prevent the joists from twisting use blocking between them.


1

Wow, those are pretty spiffy! You get bridal joints at the header and mortise & tenons at the threshold. Here in the US, we just get simple butt joints, often just stapled together. If you're willing to put some elbow grease into it, making a new mortise for the tenons isn't too difficult. There are a ton of videos on the tube of you (Paul Sellers is a ...


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