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14

When I force the door closed, the gap between door and frame by the top hinge is much larger than near the bottom hinge. This indicates to me that the top hinge was sprung at some point. In other words, something may have been caught in the door on the upper hinge side while closing it. Replace the top hinge and you should be okay. Alternatively, you might ...


6

Go to your home store and pick up a package of dowel pins or just get one big dowel rod and a drill bit to match.They come in many sizes depending on the hole you're trying to repair. Drill out the eroded wood, squirt some wood glue in the hole and tap in the dowel pin and let the glue dry. If you are going to use one long rod and cut it to the size you ...


6

This door had been broken before, there is caulk or some type of filler at the edges of the break, where some stayed on one side, some stayed on the other. This will really give you a hard time to get the parts tight enough for glue to do it job. All caulk MUST be removed from the glue area. You can use a fresh blade in a razor knife to carefully pare it off....


4

I'm in agreement with ipe, but thought it was worth noting that the price for premanufactured ipe thresholds is currently 5 times that of oak. Oak is also good quality and often used for outside door jabs. Oak has a long history of surviving punishment. Although, if you build your own threshold you could save a lot that expense. Other notable woods are maple ...


4

whenever i build a custom exterior jamb, i use ipe. its stronger and harder than anything else you will find for exterior work, takes paint well, clears beautifully, and is a great wood in general. the biggest problem you will run into with exterior jambs is moisture related warpage. ipe wont warp. to be honest, i learned long ago the best way to do what ...


4

I would use a good quality wood glue, clamp it, wipe away excess glue, and let it dry. After it is dry, you should sand it along the fracture, wood putty to fill any depressions, and let dry. Sand and then repaint.


4

You don't have to, but there's not a great alternative to prevent gaps from showing. An "undercut saw" can be rented cheaply at your local tool rental shop. It's basically a circular saw with the table configured for horizontal cuts. Try to run the blade teeth toward the wood to prevent tearout. You can also use a fine-toothed handsaw with a scrap of your ...


4

I took the top hinge off and put them in a vise, but it did not appear to be bent. I shimmed behind all 3 hinges and drove 3.5" screws into the studs. I also shimmed the other side of the door jamb and secured it to the studs with long screws. After doing all of this, the door opens and closes without interference.


3

It’s not structural. It’s just a design we use for “clean lines” without the grooves and notches in the trim, etc. If you were to remove the entire frame, you’d see that there are shims along the head and jambs. Any structural load can’t be transferred to the jambs if there’s shims in the head, AND the frame can’t be “squared” without the shims. This design ...


3

You could put some shims/wood filler/bondo in there, but it's 90% cosmetic. (The remaining 10% is that it would resist an attack with a prybar, but realistically, if someone is coming at your door with a prybar, you're doomed.) The screws (assuming they're long enough to bite solidly into the framing), will do what they're supposed to do with or without ...


2

Pry off the molding on the wall face of the broken part. If the split piece will fit back together (with some persuasion, of course), glue, clamps, a few finish nails, move on. The wall molding is easily replaced or can be reassembled similarly once the jamb is repaired. Given that everything is painted, a bit of wood filler and fresh paint, little if any ...


2

The right way to fix this is to cut out the spray foam insulation and move the window into proper position so that the two units align on a single plane. This isn't as difficult as it sounds. You can pilot and countersink some construction screws through the window frame at an upward angle into the framing to pull it outward if necessary. Work slowly and use ...


2

For a quick fix clean out any loose wood, glue small pieces of wood (matchsticks, toothpicks, even a twig off the ground) in the holes to fill them, let dry, then replace the screws.


2

One trick I've used is to remove a few screws on the top hinge and replace them with very long screws that can reach the stud (assuming wood studs). That can (not always, but sometimes), snug up the jam to the stud, raise up the door just a bit and fix your problem.


1

I like to have 1/8" to 1/2" gap all round. if you run out of gap you do not need to pack it, you can even plane the back of the jamb to make it fit.


1

This could be an easy fix or a time-consuming one - but worth a shot. With a vinyl window casing I would carefully remove the window trim at the top. That will enable you to see what you're dealing with. If there is a gap in the middle between the window casing and the header you should be able to close it up with a couple of brads. However, The window is ...


1

I would insert the spacer as you suggest, and then re-trim the front. Sanding 1/4in is a lot of work. It seems that the casing trim is straight, but the window box is curved. You can get small trims (e.g. pine stop molding) which you could mount to the front face of the box, butting it against the existing casing and against or even in front of the top of ...


1

Will the top of the door get any rain or snow? If so, do you plan to add any flashing at the top? (I hope so) There should be a top flashing that goes under the stucco and turns out over the trim of the door. Also, typically the door is set to the sheathing and the stucco is placed around the door. If you could get the door set to the sheathing, then the ...


1

Bring the exterior edge of the jamb flush with the stucco. This will make it easier to seal against water. Not sure if exterior trim will be used, but it will offer more protection against the elements. On the inside edge you'll need to rip a fill piece to make up the 1 inch shy door jamb. Glue and finish nail it to the (2) sides and the top of the door jamb....


1

I know this is old, but I'll add this for others to reference: You can drop the door & frame fairly easily. If you are replacing the casing on both sides of the door, you can essentially "remove & reinstall" the door and frame (youtube is your friend). Then the gap at the bottom of the door will be correct as well.


1

If you are going to replace the molding, I would replace the jam as well. I looks to me like you are due for an upgrade in all of your wood-work. With the new floors and new wood-work, I think you would see a marked improvement in the overall look of he space.


1

You removed one side of the jamb, and replaced it with new construction. But, there are 2 problems. the jamb is bowing; the jamb is not deep enough. The old jambs were 5 1/4" and fit perfectly since you have plaster instead of drywall. The new jams are 4 1/2" since they are assuming drywall. Those 2 problems are separate and should be treated as such on ...


1

It appears to me you have a brick exterior and a 2x4 wall that gives you a thicker wall. At the very least, you need a jamb for 2x6 walls. That may be wide enough to fit. Then follow the instructions for proper installation. Good,luck!


1

It's the carpenter's responsibility to properly shim and anchor any door jamb. Unless it's a rigid steel commercial unit, it's not designed to be self-supporting. I usually shim behind each hinge on the hinge side, and at four locations, including the latch position, on the latch side. Use a combination of wedge and flat shims. For an exterior door I ...


1

Resetting the hinges so the door sits a little further from the stop will work. Sometimes it is easier to remove the door stop and reset it away from the the door a bit, especially if you are refinishing the door jamb anyway


1

If you like (I do this sometimes for big gaps), try to find a piece of plywood exactly the right thickness for the gap behind the deadbolt. Drill thru the jamb and plywood and you may want a pilot hole in the framing. You may need to hollow out a bit of the plywood to fit the bolt of the deadbolt. This will be more secure, but the 3-inch screws and heavy ...


1

Did the door jam closed because the jamb had settled or warped? If so, you'd be better off replacing rather than repairing the jamb. I would tear out the old jamb and door and buy a replacement pre-hung door with jamb. You then will shim the new jamb into the opening. Once plumb and true, you'll nail the jamb in place through the shims, then trim it out ...


1

For filling holes on the jamb, I have had the most success using a two-part wood filler (similar to automotive body filler). Slightly overfill the old hole and let it set, then plane it down with a Surform plane ("cheese grater" plane) until level. Coarse then fine sand until smooth, prime, and paint to match. You will not be able to tell there was ever a ...


1

The usual approach is to attach a cover plate.


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