6

Pickets should not be in contact with the ground because they will hold back water like this and they will rot out very quickly. This should definitely be on the installer to fix. Additionally, the pickets should not be installed so tightly against each other that they're sealing water in. The pickets will expand and contract with humidity and need room to ...


4

Rather than "hose in pipe", use 200 PSI (if you want the tough stuff) black polyethylene pipe, and appropriate fittings, and no hose inside it. (Or schedule 80 pipe as suggested in comments, but IMPE black poly will take more abuse without leaking, and it's sun-resistant, for where it comes out of the ground.) For extra crush protection, butt it up ...


3

You've listed two different meters in your link: the M and the WMR. The M meter must be installed with the dial horizontal. The WMR meter can be installed in any direction with the flow upward in non horizontal positions. You need to determine which ones you actually have. I seriously doubt anyone here can answer your "inaccuracy" questions as it ...


3

Those pumps are rated in feet or meters of head pressure. Most submersible pumps similar to what you show are only rated to 15-20’ of head this is the equivalent of 7-10 psi or the maximum pressure it can develop. For that amountc of power it draws it probably has a fair volume. To get more pressure you usually have to sacrifice volume or add horse power. ...


3

I agree it seems redundant to use anti-siphon valves in combination with a backflow prevention device. But people don't always choose these valves because they needed the anti-siphon feature. Maybe the person who chose them just doesn't like operating or maintaining valves that are underground (harder to bend and reach) in a box full of spider webs. They ...


3

I decided to install an A.Y. McDonald 6001 series brass stop and waste valve (for example, on Amazon, ASIN B003MXYJOU). Such units are much more expensive than a common valve, and I was hoping to avoid that expense. However situations like mine are just what they're designed for. Reading other answers on the site, it is best to prioritize quality and ...


3

I think your best improvement would come from adding the tee before the filter and running the new PEX to the sillcocks. I would hold off on replacing the sillcocks at the same time as adding the tee because you might not need to depending on the results from the tee. Plus, the 3/4" sillcocks might not fit through your brick walls. Do this in stages.


2

Home Depot calls them compression couplings. Here is an example. And if you are looking for the type that go on the inside of the hose, it'll be called a barbed coupling or barbed connector.


2

Thes are also called Push to Connect fittings.


2

I would recommend that you call a local "well guy" and ask him the same questions. They have the expertise to do everything "well" related including determining if that pipe or casing is really for an old well. If it is a well, he may have even been the guy that drilled the original well or knows who drilled it to get the specs of that ...


2

Having that many heads on at 1 time you may not be able to get proper coverage. I would defiantly say the branched setup so you can run half at a time if needed. It’s not so much efficiency but coverage that will be effected. Or possibly our terminology needs to match. Separate branches run independently will cover more area and provide a more even coverage ...


2

How does it work with just the hose and no sprinkler? That pump probably doesn't have enough pressure to push water through a sprinkler. Here's a back of the envelope analysis. The pump is spec'd as having a lift of 6 m, which is ~19.8 ft. A column of water with a cross section of 1 sq inch and 2.31 feet high weighs 1 lb, or 1 psi for every 2.31 feet of ...


2

There is always the possibility that your new GFCI breaker is bad. But far more likely is that you have a fault - either improper wiring or an actual real ground fault. Based on your description, it sounds like as soon as you turn on the breaker, the GFCI trips. Is that correct? If not, please clarify. But if that is the case, you need to narrow down the ...


1

Your circuit is leaking current causing it to trip. Be sure it is correctly wired. Sometimes over looked is if the neutral wire is grounded it will cause the breaker to trip. You can start by disconnecting each device starting with disconnecting the feed lines at the boat house, if it trips you have a bad underground cable or miss wired. If it holds try each ...


1

That's the expected behavior. The manufacturer's Indexing Valve Instruction Guide, at Page 1 of 6 in describing the cam that distributes the water flow, says this: [The cam is] Used to index the valve to the next zone and controls how many outlets are to be used. The words "next zone" are telling. The user sets the cam to a specific zone, and ...


1

First order of business: why irrigate? The first order of business you have here is to determine what actual value irrigation brings beyond "green lawn". If you're irrigating vegetables and other edible or otherwise useful things, presumably using a drip system, you can skip this section entirely; however, there is a strong case to be made for not ...


1

Yes to pex all types, some sources: https://www.landscapemanagement.net/benefits-of-evolving-irrigation-pipe-products-2/ http://blog.supplyhouse.com/pex-crimp-vs-pex-clamp/ http://blog.supplyhouse.com/direct-burial-of-pex-tubing


1

Problem is the pipe from faucet to solenoid is mains pressure. The barb and ratchet clip style connection isn't rated for that pressure. if you can run pvc pipe for that stretch then that would be much less likely to leak. Effectively extending the mains from the faucet to a new outlet near the garden. The consequences of a big leak, are they very bad?


1

A definite solution to monitoring your line for leaks would be to install a meter. If you google "water meter", you'll get a list of all different types. Here is one I found after a quick search: I'm not endorsing this product and have no affiliation with the company.


1

As you have still not clarified what VFD you have or plan to buy, I'm looking at the documentation for the Goulds Aquavar Solo2, which will power a 2 hp 3phase pump. Link is via a vendor site I have purchased (other things) from but have no other association with. In Table 1 on Page 4 it specifies: For pumps up to 36 gpm a 7.3 gallon pressure tank is ...


1

Maintaining 40-50 psi is the key. Yes you can do it with a 7 gallon bladder tank and it would be better to go to a 35 gallon bladder tank but depending on your flow you could set your pump to run at 80% all day and maintain 50 psi so you really don’t need much of a pressure tank in that case. If your pump is producing 40 gallons at 70% then you want a big ...


1

If you want to do anything with this well pull the pipe up. If the water level is shallow it may come up easily as a single line with a foot valve. If it’s a submersible it may not come up easy as the wires can be hanging it up, but in both cases pull that pipe up. If you can’t remove it you can’t really expect to use the well. Once you pull the pipe the ...


1

Your holes are way too big. Dry your PVC pipe and cover the holes with vinyl electrical tape. Then get the smallest sewing needle you can find and just prick the surface of the tape so you get a slow drip. You can increase the drip rate as you go up the pole by making just a slightly larger puncture. Remember, you want drips, not streams.


1

You have standard couplings and t’s. since it’s above ground I would guess low pressure drip irrigation. There are tons of brands I just make sure the size is correct and go to a big box store. But Amazon also has them some are called compression, some barbed but coupling is for 1 pipe to another and T is for 3 pieces


1

Not strictly an answer to the question as asked, but… Preventative measure… go round the house at least twice a year & just cycle each one open/closed a few times. Most houses should have similar in-line stop-cocks on every tap (faucet) inlet so check under sinks, baths, water heater etc. They get sticky after a while, especially in hard water areas, but ...


1

You need a right angled screw driver with a long handle for applying maximum force to the valve. Here's a DIY version: attach a locking pliers (vise grip) to the handle of a screw driver. You should now be able to press the slot-head forcefully into the valve slot while wrenching it counterclockwise (loose). If you can shut the water off before the back flow ...


1

Flow direction will be engraved on the side or bottom. Stick your phone in selfie mode down there to see it. Alternately clean off that red plate between D and E, you'll see the model number and can look up the manual on line. Draining will only help if this is the low point of the whole irrigation system and the pipes generally run uphill with no low ...


1

In my area, it is common for PVB to break if incorrectly winterized, but local water code requires these to be installed and inspected annually, with an inspection report filed with the city water authority. I see duct tape on the PVB so this is likely cracked and causing the leak you mentioned in a comment. I'd hazard a guess that water does come from the ...


1

Another option might be to install a drain basin in that corner, and connect it to a pipe that runs underground beneath the fence.


1

the posts in the fence appear to be untreated cedar (the entire fence appears to be untreated cedar actually) so if those posts are just going into the dirt then they will rot out within a few years and then you won't have this problem anymore as you won't have the fence anymore. You can pick up a small circular saw that is easier to control for a job like ...


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