30

These are Hose Guides. They're usually placed near deck posts and similar obstructions to stop your water hose from kinking when you pull it around a corner. They're also used near gardens to stop you dragging the hose through the garden and ruining your planting. Possibly this one:


15

User Matthew is correct that a nipple extractor may help you salvage the tee. You need to check the threads in the Tee for any damage, since if the threads are scratched you may get a leak. If the tee is badly damaged If the tee can’t be reused, you will need to replace it. This part is readily available at any home-improvement store (but see below). ...


12

That is a strainer wye. There is a metal mesh filter in there to trap sediment/debris; it can be removed and cleaned as necessary.


11

There is a tool called a nipple extractor. It can be used to remove broken threaded parts just like this. You can find one online or from any irrigation supply or DIY retailer likely for under $15. You firmly press it into the broken part and turn to remove it.


8

I'd try to go through the slab and then below it. Most slabs are 6" thick with gravel underneath. You can rent a concrete core drill for around $60 from home depot. Stick a hole in your slab. Then you can use something called a 'sidewalk sleever' to tunnel under the slab. Then install pipe (a little tricky due to the elbow, and fill your hole back up ...


7

The best lubrication I've found is some good ol' Elbow Grease™. Actually, you should measure the proper lengths and just cut. Then glue it up and install. You can mark on the PVC how far it should go into the fitting if you want to be really precise. However PVC itself expands and contracts a lot with temperature change and is fairly flexible anyway. So, in ...


5

That looks like a very flimsy coupling, as it barely has anything to hang on to. Better to use a regular PVC barbed coupling, which looks like this: Usually you use a stainless steel clamp around the connections: With bigger/thicker pipe, you sometimes need to heat the pipe using a torch slightly -- just get it a bit pliable so you can get the fitting in, ...


5

Pickets should not be in contact with the ground because they will hold back water like this and they will rot out very quickly. This should definitely be on the installer to fix. Additionally, the pickets should not be installed so tightly against each other that they're sealing water in. The pickets will expand and contract with humidity and need room to ...


4

When drip irrigation connectors leak, it is usually because the hole that was punched into the 1/2" hose is too large. This can happen when you try to re-punch the hole because the 1st punch did not go all the through and you can't get your connector into the line. When you try to re-punch a hole it's extremely hard to get the punch in exactly the same ...


4

You will need a concrete saw that has about a 12 or 14" diamond blade to cut all the way through the slab. These are a rental item. Ask the guy at the counter what would be the size of blade you need to cut it. These type of saws can have water feed to the blade so the blade stays cool, which is a safer way to cut, and practically eliminates all the dust ...


3

It looks like the Green or Green/White wire is also hooked up. He used 4 twisted pairs, most commonly used as Ethernet wire (the one that you use for internet on your computer, router, modem, etc.) and is most likely a Category 5 cable. It is a relative cheap cable that has 8 wires, looks like he only needed a few but it is easier and cheaper to use what you ...


3

I just stumbled upon this question because I had the same issue. This was one of the first google hits. Super old thread, but no satisfactory answer for me. The roundness of those plastic barbs is assumed, but definitely not justifiably so. The result is a round, or elliptical hole, and a round or elliptical barb. I found by simply twisting the barb ...


3

Are the sprinkler heads attached to the underside of the supply line? The proper way to design this system would be to have the sprinkler attach to the top of the supply line instead of the bottom. With the sprinkler heads attached above the supply line, the most excess water that would be drained is the water in the short pipe above the sprinkler head.


3

Since you don't mention it, you have probably left out the pressure regulator. The pressure tolerance of drip systems is pretty low. Ideally they like to run around 25-30 PSI. Most homes have 50 PSI or more. In my case, it's 120 PSI. You should also consider getting a filter at the same time you get the pressure regulator.


3

3/4" solenoid valves use around 20 to 30 VA. to open. Look on the name plate and it should say what the VA. or watts is. You can buy a ( 120/208/240) input X 24 volt output transformer Rated at 60 va.for about $50.00. I saw on Amazon a Siemens MTO100C 120/208/240volt X 24 volt, 100VA. for about the same price.


3

Simplest 100% legal way would be to make it use rain water directly from storage containers, and then a float valve that fills the rain barrel with city water if the water level gets below a certain level. This would also allow you to maintain an airgap between potable and non-potable water sources. You're losing the free water pressure from the city water, ...


3

If your available tools include a sledgehammer, just use that, held vertically, head down, pick it up and drop it, repeatedly, every 2 or 3 inches of soil fill (you cannot effectively tamp thicker layers of soil with hand tools.) Forget the wood block.


3

Yes, you want a water pressure gauge with a female hose thread. There are some on Amazon for less than US$10.


3

The jet pump may have a failed jet or plugged with sediment , that you can feel vibration on the submersible would concern me that must be really in bad shape to feel movement.


3

I agree it seems redundant to use anti-siphon valves in combination with a backflow prevention device. But people don't always choose these valves because they needed the anti-siphon feature. Maybe the person who chose them just doesn't like operating or maintaining valves that are underground (harder to bend and reach) in a box full of spider webs. They ...


3

I think your best improvement would come from adding the tee before the filter and running the new PEX to the sillcocks. I would hold off on replacing the sillcocks at the same time as adding the tee because you might not need to depending on the results from the tee. Plus, the 3/4" sillcocks might not fit through your brick walls. Do this in stages.


2

If you still can't get those unglued pvc pieces apart, we found that a flathead screwdriver and a rubber mallet help loosen the pieces enough to be able to pull them apart.


2

I realize this is a really old thread, but it helped me find a solution to my similar problem and so I thought I'd add my 2 cents worth in case it helps somebody else. I too had an old Rain Bird automatic sprinkler control valve (1 inch) where the valve itself had started leaking. I searched locally for either a 311A Irritrol or Champion PCL-100-C to ...


2

To answer my own question (after a bit of research)... In terms of following standard sprinkler system layouts, there is no technical reason why a downward sloping pipe would just end and be bent. This seems to be a unique feature to this system. Most likely, the pipe was laid for future expansion. Perhaps budget was an important issue at time of ...


2

I use a multi-port automatic sprinkler valve coupled to an 8-way drip irrigation manifold, and use city water pressure.


2

Dry Pump failure modes Some irrigation pumps are created the impeller housing casting an integral part of the motor and depend on the water flow through the pump to dissipate heat instead of using rotor fins and airflow for cooling. The reason for doing this is that they tend to be in high moisture locations or locations where detritus can be sucked into ...


2

Champion Irrigation makes a valve called the PCL-100 which is compatible with the body from the APAS-100 (and a PCL-075 which ought to fit the body of the APAS-075), which are available as of this writing. The specific part that I got is the PCL-100-C (not sure what the C means and if the B model works in the same way). The valve fit perfectly onto the ...


2

The best way to deal with this does not involve digging up your whole lawn. You just need to dig up the area around the sprinkler head that needs to be lowered. Once you dig out the area cut off the existing 90 degree elbow that is in there feeding up. Cut on the horizontal pipe about 5 to 6" from the existing elbow. Next you would install two 45 degree ...


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