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Answer collated from comments... Looks like there are three separate things going on here, with an interesting interaction... a Grid Tie inverter This is supposed to shut down when disconnected from the grid. That's a fundamental safety requirement of grid tie inverters called "anti-islanding". When the grid fails, does your inverter power the ...


3

It is not that the compressor motor is inductive, but that, at startup, it draws far more current than while running. This is a characteristic of most electric motors, but is exacerbated that until it is pinning, having a large moment of inertia, the compressor is pushing against the "spring" of uncompressed vapor. The locked rotor current draw might be five ...


3

It's easier to teach a violinist the bongoes than the other way 'round. You should be shopping for an A/C unit with "soft start". This is one of the reasons for these units to exist - ability to start off inverters, generators etc. They use an inverter drive to run the compressor motor. They are also able to run the motor at different speeds to suit ...


3

Forget the inverter. 99% of portable power tools use what's called a "Universal Motor" which is actually a DC motor that does its own internal rectifying of an AC input. So you can feed DC directly into that type of motor. If it is a 230V rated tool, you need for the voltage to be approx. 330VDC so with 18V batteries, that is 19 of them in series. Do you ...


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It's possible but not as easy as stringing them into an inverter. DeWalt makes a device for this purpose in their 20v line. https://www.dewalt.com/products/gear-and-equipment/generators-and-portable-power/1800-watt-portable-power-station-and-simultaneous-battery-charger/dcb1800b


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The simplest question can have the most complex answer at times. I'll try to help. Variable speed systems have some advantages over single stage or single speed systems. For Florida I would say the best benefit is that it allows the system to be optimized for dehumidification in cooling. The fan slows down and the cooling coil gets colder and pulls more ...


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I'm perfectly fearless about proposing bold solutions... but this is NOT one yyou want to pursue. Unless you aim to rewind the motors, stacking batteries means you'd be pumping 230ish volts DC into the motor. DC at such voltages is like the honey badger of electricity: rather badly behaved stuff. It will more seriously shock you. And if it starts arcing,...


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The basic answer is: You should be OK. You are looking at the numbers "backwards". A 20A receptacle/breaker/etc. (assuming everything is installed correctly) can safely supply up to 20A total, and up to 16A continuous load. A 15A receptacle/breaker/etc. can safely supply up to 15A total, and up to 12A continuous load. While generally speaking an appliance ...


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Your desktop computer's PSU draws electricity in a more complicated way than something like a light or fan does. Nothing's really working incorrectly... it's just that the inverter and the power supply weren't built for each other. The power supply is sucking power when the inverter doesn't expect it, causing a dip in the voltage; then the inverter up-...


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You have faithfully built out your grounding system and kept it separate from the neutral system, which is better than a lot of people do. It sounds like you've done this work to Code. But what you never did is fit the neutral-ground bond in your main panel. A house has exactly one neutral-ground bond And the problem is, your generator already has one ...


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No. You can't wigger-jigger it like that. I've been saying this a lot today, but if one thing is broken and wrong, it's best to fix that first - the other problem may take care of itself if you do. You need a proper interlock so that it is physically impossible for any of the prongs on any plugs to get "lit up". If your breaker panel lends itself to ...


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Get a hydrometer and learn how to use it for detailed analysis. For less detailed analysis, if a lead acid bank is below 2.1 volts per cell (in use) the smart money is on cutting it off if you care about long life. So if your 12 or 24V bank actually reads 12 or 24 volts, you are probably dipping below a healthy discharge level. Better quality battery ...


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In theory yes, you're correct, a 40W bulb will draw 10X more current at 12V than 120V. But nearly all bulbs I'm familiar with are either 12V or 120V but NOT BOTH. If you connect a 12V/40W bulb to a 120V power source you will almost certainly burn the bulb out in moments. Your inverter, however, will not make the bulb light longer since, again in theory, ...


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PCs, especially cheap PCs, have pretty big power supplies. The "850 watt" power supply actually draws over 1200 watts. It sounds like your PC is simply too much for the system. It may be necessary to downsize the PC, maybe get rid of performance video cards, get a smaller power supply, etc. One of the "micro-PCs or a Mac Mini would be a ...


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Can you - yes. Is it a good idea - no. A 150AH @ C10 and 150AH @ C20 battery are not the same "size" because one is rated at the 10-hour discharge rate and the other is rated at the 20 hour discharge rate. Since you have not specified some other chemistry, I'm assuming both are lead-acid 12V batteries, as the majority of 12V batteries are. If by &...


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You're not only mixing different models. You're also mixing new and used batteries. This means, as a pack, you will get the performance of the worst battery. When it gives up the ghost, you will be left with 1 battery that still has some useful life, and you will be tempted to pair it with a new battery. Don't. At that point replace with all new. Keep in ...


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I think your math all checks out and you have good command of the concepts here. You need a few more concepts though. Lead-acid batteries are bizarre. While they are cheap, they do not work the way they obviously ought to work. The #1 thing they don't do is deep-discharge well. If you run a lead-acid battery from 90% to 10%, you will get three to 100 of ...


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Motor startup surge is going to be the biggest issue. You will probably need a 2000W inverter for this. The motor will surely be 240V. Pump motors are run at the highest practicable voltage to reduce voltage drop. A motor is typically at the bottom of a potentially deep well, and so the run from house to wellhead, then down the well itself can be 600 feet ...


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If you have not yet bought the pump, you may want to reconsider. If you buy a 3 phase pump, you can use a VFD to power it. Use a VFD that will accept a DC input directly, then you don't need the inverter (it IS an inverter). That will avoid the starting current surge of the motor, because VFD controls that. The down sides: Your DC voltage for a 230V pump ...


1

Originally I was wondering if the Mains 225A max. from the label inside the panel box was the rating of the bus bar. Since it seems there are/can be addition labels on the panel interior itself (the black plastic holding the breakers and bus bars), I wasn't sure if I'd have to pull the meter and main breaker to confirm. Researching Schneider's website, I ...


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You're thinking about the wrong units And/or you don't know how the units work. Volts are like pressure/force. It's like how fast you pedal the bike. Amps are like flow/distance. It's like how hard you push when pedaling the bike (the part that's hard on your knees). As you know, you can get up a hill on a bicycle in different gears. One is ...


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Upon further investigation it's just too high of a startup surge. Somewhere around 1800w according to my meter (which doesn't always catch the brief surge). I'm not the only one having overload problems running a 5000 BTU A/C off inverter power - most are having issues with 1000-2000w inverter generators. There are some devices on the market for this that ...


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The LDCI or air conditioner microcontroller may be checking for proper grounding. You should have exactly one neutral-ground bond. When on shore power, that bond is on the shore-side so the RV should have no bond. When on inverter, that must come from inverter, and be removed when on shore. Other than that, I suspect the inverter is much too small for ...


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Change the SMPS/power supply unit in your desktop. I had the same problem. Spent 6 months trying to solve the issue by changing inverters, etc without any luck. Finally found out that problem was with SMPS. Replaced the SMPS (Gigabyte p450b) with another one (Cooler Master 450) and the flickering went away.


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Solar or other off-grid power is 10% generation, 80% conservation... And 10% selecting products. The first thing that concerns me is plain overload. The problem is "every light and fan in the house" is not a scientific unit of measure. I really wish we had something like a Kill-A-Watt to measure each light and fan. We are concerned with both watts and ...


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I suspect there's a sizing issue here because I'd be surprised if a 3000W inverter could start a 3000W motor. If you run the inverter at its nameplate capacity, your immediate 12 VDC current draw will be 300 amps or more. Aside from inverter losses, you will have considerable voltage drop in whatever wires you are using to connect to the batteries, and ...


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As mentioned in comments, typical inverter switch times are fine for most devices. The only way I know of to literally have NO downtime is dual-conversion, where your inverter is supplying the AC power 100% of the time, and your grid power is converted to DC and fed into the battery / DC input of the inverter. That has built-in inefficiencies (thus, wasted ...


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Yes, he's right. Imagine this scenario. You happen to be "going to town" - air conditioner is cycled on, dryer running, water heater heating and range/oven has the works turned on. That's 30+30+30+50 = 140 amps* of power from the large appliances. You are only served by mains power. OK, the 100A main breaker snaps to protect the bus-bars in the ...


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This unit requires a 15A breaker The manual for this particular machine specifically calls out a 15A circuit breaker. That is the final word on the subject; NEC 110.3b requires you obey the labeling and instructions. (the reason is that the UL listing is contingent on installation according to the labeling and instructions; UL hasn't tested this unit on ...


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