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8

TL;DR it should be OK to run them together. The signals from a security sensor are typically very low frequency because they're generated by the switch within the sensor opening and closing as the sensor activates. So for a motion detector, it might open and close a few times as you cross the field of view; a door or window sensor would switch as often as ...


8

I agree with DMoore that the flickering is almost certainly caused by a voltage dip when a large appliance turns on. A fridge can easily pull 1000+ watts momentarily as the compressor starts. If you want to verify the voltage dip you can do so with a multimeter with a "MIN" function. Insert the multimeter probes into the outlet that's giving you trouble, ...


6

When the fridge turns on (some) and when (some) ovens start their capacitors pull a ton of current to start the motor/function needed. If these are on the same circuit as your TV this is a pretty big issue and the fluctuations could cause damage to your TV circuit board over time. Even if these aren't on the same circuit your TV is getting a voltage ...


5

No cause for concern, cat 6 and other UTP network cables are very good at rejecting interference, the relatively low voltage and power of the security system will not disrupt the signal on the UTP. Big, high power sources of interference like arc welders might.


4

Since the electrical wire is in metal conduit, I would have no fear of interference. Just do not attach the ethernet to the metal conduit, as you are not allowed to use electrical conduit as a hanger for anything. Another factor: Most plastics do not like UV light, which the sun emits in great quantity. This could be a serious problem for the sheath on ...


4

For that distance, I'd recommend using shielded CAT-6A cable. We have a similar issue in our church, and over only 150ft we found that standard cat-6 cable lost enough quality that it was noticeable. No problems with shielded CAT-6A (which is designed for 10Gb/s to a maximum of 328ft) 3ft of separation from 120v is plenty for any implementation; I'm usually ...


3

Yes you can, as long as you keep the conductors separated. However, you should likely avoid it if possible. Common practice is to keep power and communications circuits in separate stud bays. National Electrical Code allows you to put power and communication circuits in the same box, as long as all the conductors are separated by a permanent barrier or ...


3

I can only say from experience, but I've never had any problems running cat5e/6 for data/voice and security along with coax in the same bundle. This is in an office environment. In a sensitive environment like a datacenter environment they would likely be in separate raceways but I wouldn't worry about it in your home.


3

This could be a bunch of problems, from a missing ground to a voltage spike, to dying speakers, etc... First of all, it would be helpful to rule in/out the computer as the source of the popping. It's possible your computer's sound card is not great and is sending those noises to the speaker, which is faithfully playing them. Try plugging the speakers into a ...


3

Excellent article! I just had my GDO remote drop from 30+ feet range to where I had to at the garage door - and it took several tries to cause the door to open. I had just installed a wireless indoor security camera and that was the culprit - unplugging it removed the issue. I tried various increases of GDO antenna length but no improvement. I was in the ...


2

I had a similar problem. I have two garage doors with identical wall controls, remotes, operators. When my wife came back from the store today her remote would not open the door on her side of the garage. When I tried to come in my side also would not operate. The remote had worked when she left for the store earlier. The wall controls worked fine. I tried ...


2

The national association for Amateur Radio (aka the American Radio Relay League or ARRL) has a PDF document about reducing radio interference. Among other things it suggests turning off the circuits in the house one at a time when the problem exists to narrow down the source of an device causing noise. This Angie's List article has a list of common sources ...


2

Thanks for the suggestions, I finally figured it out. This is a new one for me. Several lamps on the top fixtures were loose (still working fine but loose). When I opened the fixtures to check the grounds the noise reduced by the time I got to the last one the noise was gone. My wife thinks when we loaded the hay loft in June we must have shaken them loose. ...


2

TL;DR If your rangetop is well-built and you are using those cables only for TCP ethernet traffic, you probably won't notice any problems. On the other hand, if you rangetop's switching circuitry is noisy, and you have some signals that are very sensitive to interference in those cables, you may be better off with a different cooking technology. Long ...


1

You're not allowed to mix low-voltage and mains wiring in any way, shape or form in the same cables, conduits or raceways. The reason is safety: the data cables may not threaten the power cables, but melting or damage of the power cables absolutely could cross mains "hot" voltages onto your data cables. This is only allowed if the data cables and ...


1

I know there isn't a black and white answer on this one, but I'm going to post the decision I made as the answer (based on everyone's feedback). It just felt too close to run the coax/cat6 4" from the main power lines. My handyman was able to cut out a small section of the drywall on the adjacent wall, run the coax/cat6 behind it and feed in to the ...


1

No, for two reasons: Induction ranges operate at kHz frequencies. Modern data transmission is done at frequencies that are thousands to millions of times higher. Cat6 is twisted, and RG6 is shielded, to mitigate noise from electrical interference.


1

The bridge tap basically just means that you have your DSL modem connected to a pair of phone wires that also branches off to (probably) other jacks in your home. All of those jacks are "bridged" together. This could literally be crimped or twisted connections inside your walls, or you might have a wiring closet with more structure, such as all the wires ...


1

You may be able to check for 2.4Ghz interference by installing a WiFi router that uses 2.4 and connecting to it, then don't an internet speedtest at the suspect time. If your garage door opener uses that frequency...


1

I have 3 units air con of same brand in my office room. So all 3 units will turn on/off at the same time, by single one remote control. So I used a brown tape to cover the signal emitter to weaken the signal strength, and it works. But i have to place the remote control very near to the relatively air con, and i can control each air con individually.


1

Updated solution per comment: The fire alarm should not be connected to a switch at all. It's likely that it is connected to the same switch as the light but with the wires reversed. The solution would be to remove the fire alarm black & white wires from the switch and splice them in the box to the cable that feeds the switch, but before it "hits" the ...


1

Use some kind of line filter on your circuit connection to remove the electromagnetic interference (EMI). Sometimes they are called EMI filters or sine filters (for bigger appliances). They are produced as IEC inlet filters too (search for them). They are based (mostly) on interference suppression capacitors, but can be quite complicated to filter out the ...


1

Also see What should I look for when diagnosing electrical circuit gremlins where load is much less than capacity?. I had pretty much the same sort of problem, and while the answer isn't pretty, it may be a train-of-thought option.


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