New answers tagged

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Meet solar load When the sun beats on your house, it warms it up - winter or summer. (more in the summer). There's 1000 watts of solar heat per square meter that's square-on with the sun, and only a limited ability of your roof to shed that heat - eventually some of it pushes through the insulation. This is a lot of heat, and you get the brunt of it ...


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If it were my house, I would leave the blown in insulation in there and remove enough sheathing to blow in more, say maybe 16" total or at least dd enough to get it to code. I would think 1 or 2 boards about every 6-8' apart will allow good coverage and depending on the roofing going back down, just add a layer of plywood over the existing sheathing since ...


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This is a little late, but if you really want to keep heating and cooling costs down then you need to insulate the roof in the attic space as well as above the ceiling, basically every surface area in the attic space should be well insulated. I've rented a house here in Southern Arizona that had a very heavily insulated attic space (so well insulated that it ...


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At the least i would cover it with 1/4" plywood. At the most I would cover it with 4X8 sheets of cement board. Depending on the moisture present under the home, would temper the choice further.


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To answer the question, the baffles allow air all around them, with the exception of spraying foam insulation on one side of them, so it does not matter if they are breathable or not. In my opinion, if the insulation was done properly, you should have 8" of insulation, perhaps only 6", stopping at the wall, and not going into the soffit. The air space over ...


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Looks more like shredded fiberglass. If you have a torch or gas stove or BBQ, hold some with tongs in the flame until it glows red and see what happens. Fiberglass will melt a little and you will see tiny balls form on the ends of the strands. Asbestos will not change. Or send it out to be tested.


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Where there are trusses, it's relatively easy to add short horizontal supports between any two uprights. Then you can add planks to walk on between the horizontals. Use a string line to ensure that a run of horizontal supports line up and the plank sits securely. You can determine the thickness of plank required by testing outdoors. Standard floor boards ...


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There are shower heads which have a removable head in which the water is conducted through a flexible hose. It might be possible to have the valve on one wall and the shower head holder on a perpendicular wall. The water supply connection point of the flexible hose would be close to the corner on the same wall as the valve so the hose would hang close the ...


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I don’t know why you would need rock wool any r30 should work. As far as adding length and bends to the shower it should not matter. All shower heads have flow restriction built in so your limiting factor is the head itself


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I live in Florida too so I know exactly what you mean about hot attics. I had the same problem except for the pvc water pipes. I put up a number of 2 by 8 feet of 3/4 inch plywood on the rafters. Where it was possible to move over some of the cables, I did it. where I couldn't move them, I took some 2x4's, notched them for the wires to go thru and put them ...


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A vapor barrier is essential. Without it, moisture will pass into the insulation and condense there when in reaches the dew-point temperature. At the very least, this will degrade the R-value of the insulation. Far more likely, it will create a lovely environment for mold and insects.


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I would have used a frost proof faucet with the longest shaft, usually 12", so the shut off with the "water in the pipe" supply would be closer to the heated area. I see that you installed a shut off valve to isolate and drain the discharge connection but I still would prefer a frost proof unit. My 2 cents.


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I would make a 1" plug for each end so bugs don't get in. A hard foam ring would be what I would go for. I would not fill with expanding foam or similar as that will glue the pipe in place.


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I find batt insulation easy to pull out and re-install. Drilling near existing fiberglass (guessing that is what you have) can lead to strands getting caught in the bit and spinning. I recommend pull out the batts of insulation, do the electrical work and they reinstall the same batts you pulled. Also assuming you have vapor barrier or retarder on the face ...


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Quick test: fiberglass will melt and form tiny beads in a propane torch flame (or perhaps one from a butane lighter), asbestos will glow yellow or white hot without noticeable melting. Pull a few strands out (while wearing a particle mask) and test them. Normally, I would not advise you going into a site with possible asbestos and disturbing it, but you ...


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Hi guys i was reading the thread here and all around here are some misguided assumptions on all parts, I'm an electrician of almost 20 years and an electrical estimator. Knob and tube wiring replacements in historic homes are something I've specialized in for over a decade now. First rule of thumb to consider when dealing with knob and tube wiring is its ...


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If you have your insulation on the roof sheathing and the roofing covers it, presumably there is adequate ventilation for the attic so condensation hasn't been an issue already since the foam is non permeable. Another assumption I will make is that you have an attic space that would be a conditioned space since the roof insulation is above that. With those ...


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