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As someone explained in response to a related question I asked, the key thing to ask turned out to be, "What is the U-factor for this window?" The standard 250 series with added foam insulation in the frame (added at the factory) is 0.28. The better 350 series with added foam insulation in the frame, and triple pane (which I will use in the bathroom, where ...


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First, to bust a rumor, if it's the same model/SKU, it's the same part. If you see a "549E" model at Home Depot, and a dealer also sells a 549E, then it's the real McCoy. However, they may well make a "547H" model that's been shaved for Home Depot (it may even be made by a different manufacturer.) The big-box stores are very tough on vendors, on both price ...


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You can just use a regular box instead of the low voltage box. Specifically, I would suggest getting an old work draft tight box, like this one. They have gaskets at the cable passthroughs to keep drafts/moisture from going through the box.


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A wireless AP that is power via PoE. Connect a power injector on the source end of the RJ45 or get a PoE supporting router. Then you only need a hole large enough to poke a network cable through. PoE+. PoE+, or 802.3at, provides up to 30W of power to powered devices. The upcoming IEEE 802.3bt aka 4PPoE (4 Pair Power over Ethernet) standard will ...


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Use your exhaust fan. It removes grease, products of combustion and most of all moisture. Do you just never use your stove top? I suppose if all you ever do is microwave and use your oven you don't need to. You can fill the gap with roxul insulation which is fire proof. Typically your exhaust fan venting will lead to the exterior wall which has a wall ...


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I'd do a combination of sealing the holes with tape/silicone and then tuck fiberglass or foam board insulation into the cavities between the joists. I've done this in a couple of houses I've lived in and the difference was remarkable. The tape (or silicone) will take care of the drafts while the insulation will prevent heat transfer through the wood ...


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An alternative to Ed Beal's excellent answer might be just sealing the penetrations with flexible tape designed to ensure air-tightness. It is amazing what a difference eliminating draughts does to the warmth of a room (both because it means the air temperature is higher, and because still air feels much warming than moving air).


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Cutting rigid foam really won’t be much better than what you have unless you seal the boards with foam. I would spray foam around the penetrations first. I use a closed-cell foam that sticks well and can be sprayed on then it expands to ~1-1/2” but that is a small space and the stuff I use really doesn’t store well. It covers ~100sf per can or so. I might ...


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You may not be able to get rid of the windows entirely as they serve as egress (fire escape); you need at least two. If the sun shines through the window, you wouldn't have net heat loss during the daylight hours -- it would be adding heat to the home (assuming a properly sealed/draftless window). At night, insulating blinds or heavy insulating curtains ...


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I know this is an old question, but here's another solution. Use foam insulation board to make an open-top box around the fan in the attic, sealed down to the ceiling. Make a top, cut it in half, and hinge each half on the side so it swings up by air pressure when the fan is turned on, then falls closed by gravity when you turn the fan off. (Example: ...


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Using the most energy efficient type of window will help. Double hung and sliding windows are made to fit a little loose so sashes can slide past each other. Use an awning or casement window that has a latch that pulls the sash in tight AND locks it tight will have less air infiltration, etc.


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One option is to use honeycomb-style insulating blinds. The downside is that they block the sun during the day so you don't get any heat gain. If you use them on the dark side (s) of the home they definitely help with heat loss. Depending on the amount of sun and quality of the windows, if you open and close them regularly as needed on the sunny side(s) ...


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Just a layer of shrink wrap will be fine , as long as you prevent the moisture from getting up to it it will quit sweating. Make sure to run the exhaust fans in the bathroom when bathing or using hot water to shave, also run your exhaust when cooking. I found some really good stuff for sealing windows in the past that you put on the frame and shrink it ...


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It looks like there is a layer of foam between the siding and the house this was quite common. I would not seal below the siding, this could trap moisture and since there is a layer of foam attached to the sheeting there really shouldn’t be any air movement and this is outside the structure, the stud bays them selves are another air space beyond that. I ...


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I have steel casement windows, love the look. House is unquie and beautiful. However in the NY winter they are a problem. I got a product that made a huge difference called a Indow. Expensive, but it’s a custom fit for each window frame of hard plastic w foam edge around. Creating a second barrier to single pane glass. Made a big difference...I’m ...


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I have the same situation in Pa but have also tried radiant barrier with the ventilation holes. I am still in a quandry about how to use it. This is what I have experienced: I laid the foil over my insulation as often recommended. In the spring I went into the attic to check on the nature of things. I lifted a section and my fiberglass insulation was short ...


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I don't see any darkening on the braces, rafters, or underside of the roof deck, as I would expect if you had that much mold. It looks like plain dust to me.


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Yes it will make a noticeable difference, but I'd be hard-pressed to do that on a place I was renting. With free natural gas, I'd be tempted to get a NG generator and run bigger A/Cs. I'm surprised you need AC that bad in central WV. I grew up in southern WV w/o AC--and never really needed it up in the mountains... Good luck.


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I've been in no less than 300 attics and every one of then has had dust, grey dust, in them. Your attic has soffits installed to vent the attic. You also have vent pipes going through the roof to vent caps that allow some backdraft into the attic. If you've ever had your roof redone, stuff will be knocked down. Mold needs a fare amount of moisture and most ...


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My hob installation instructions calls for an insulation layer above the oven (which is below the hob). It fails to specify what or how thick etc. I'll probably use a bit of dry wall plasterboard (pink stuff for around fires) and maybe a bit of silver heat proof tape.


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If you're putting back the skirting boards, you can get wooden beading/moulding to cover the expansion gap. Alternatively you could use a thin bead of hidden flexible caulk underneath the skirting board if you don't mind having a gap, as this would stop drafts coming from underneath. In my (limited) experience this 2 inch gap is normal on both ...


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I contacted Clopay. They sent the attached general information regarding thermal testing of garage doors, however, they did not specifically address how they could achieve the 18.4 R value of my garage doors. I asked again for specific test data, either measured, or calculated, for their Thermacore insulation. Supposedly their engineers will provide the ...


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I have not had problems with flex duct sweating but the humidity in Oregon is low compared to the east coast. If the duct is totally encapsulated in insulation it cannot sweat. The humid air has to come in contact with a cold surface to condense moisture so a duct that is fully covered won’t sweat in the first place.


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If you can keep the ducts 100% on the occupied side of the attic insulation, it will enhance the performance of your heating/cooling system. However, if you lay the ducts on the ceiling and install loose fill insulation up around the ducts, you’re creating a gap 6”-10” wide (the width of your duct) in your attic insulation. If you provide sufficient “...


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Loctite PL300 Foamboard is good, but Loctite PL Premium also says it glues XPS (Pink) foam - Product page, see tech data sheet – I have used both in the past few days (Foamboard to glue pieces to each other, and PL to glue foam to wood) – but I didn't remove any laminate. Both glues seem OK, but "mechanical" fasteners are often called for. In other words, ...


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Several companies make a foamboard adhesive. Loctite PL300 Foamboard is one. The foamboard will be waterproof (at least as far as your needs are concerned) as it is. It is not fireproof, however. It's also very light, so unless you're also building some sort of structure to hold it in place, the first wind will send it flying. No comment on the material ...


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Yellow gorilla glue works well on foam, and won't melt it. It needs a little moisture to work so apply a light mist of water to one side, and a thin bead of glue to the other. (Wood normally has sufficient moisture already, but foam has none). Hold it together with tape while the glue sets, and wipe up the extra every 10 minutes for about an hour - it ...


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Firstly, as has been said, that material will not hold up to either the cats or the weather. You need an actual siding over it. The construction adhesive you mentioned will eat the foam unless it's the water-based "panel" or "project" variety. The solvent in the heavy duty type dissolves polystyrene. I built a similar "hot box" for my dog using the same ...


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It depends a great deal on the particular foam. XPS is available in many compressive strengths, though probably you only get one option at mass market home stores. That option would appear to be 25 Pounds per Square Inch (PSI), based on some quick product research. So a 500 lb tub+occupant would be held up by 20 square inches of that foam, if the load was ...


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It depends on what you mean by "support". It will hold the tub up but it will flex. The movement of the flexing may loosen plumbing connections ; not the first time , but movement over an extended time could work things loose. It may even cause leaks at what ever caulk or trim is used on the top edge of the tub.The weigt of 6" water in a 5' tub is roughly ...


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Blown insulation may be cheaper and do a good job. You could use a combination of foam boards and batts if the 2x’s are deep enough. How is this room heated? This may be part of the problem also some rooms over the garage were additions and proper heating not installed so this should be part of your investigation. I mention the heating because if built ...


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I would use 1" or 2" rigid foam. You can glue it, but I would glue and use small bolts and fender washers on both sides of the door to keep the bolts from pulling through. #8 screws or carriage bolts should both work. Carriage bolts would look better. I would use locking nuts also. The foam's R-value is not as high as I would like. Perhaps another ...


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I just had an idea that I'll experiment with since I don't know where one end of the PEX terminates - whether it works depends, I imagine, on the friction between the piping and the insulation, so feedback on that is welcome. :) If the insulation slides back and forth fairly easily along the length of the pipe, I could install new sections at the point of ...


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Any kind of insulation will help us would consider boxing by in the space also, if in an elevated area we used to have trouble with swallows building their mud nests in areas like that so boxing them was a must, (I don’t see that issue here but we had it just north of you). But insulation will help.


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I can't tell for sure based on the picture, but it looks to me like you have the roof deck on the left, and a knee wall on the right that separates an already finished portion of the attic from the area pictured, like this: and you are considering utilizing one of the areas labeled Attic 1 as the closet. If that is correct, you may already have a slight ...


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You cannot achieve R38 in only 5 1/2 inches. One of the highest rated insulations is spray foam, and it is around R6 per inch, which would require 6 3/8 inches at least. If you did fur out the rafters with 2x2s (1.5 x 1.5) then you would have 7 inches total to use and could install 1/2 inch baffles and have closed cell spray foam installed. It would be ...


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You can use something like a Larsen truss (non-structural) to make more space for insulation. Basically attach thin plywood to the existing rafter / truss members and attach a 2x2 to hold the face of the insulation / drywall at the appropriate spacing below the roof sheathing.


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