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20

There are really two reasons to rake a roof (snow weight and ice dams), and there are two reasons not to rake (effort and roofing damage). Raking to reduce snow weight If you're concerned that the weight of accumulated snow will exceed load design limits, by all means pull some snow off. You don't want a collapse. This is a rare situation in northern ...


12

You should not be touching your shingles when raking. If you have 5" on roof you don't need to touch it. If you have 24" on roof you don't need to rake the last two inches. Also rake in the early morning so sunlight helps distribute water/ice better. There isn't general advice to give because it is dependent on the amount of snow on your roof,...


10

As others have said, whether to rake or not depends on your circumstances. See the picture: I have a steep poorly insulated roof over my home that extends out over an unheated garage and becomes more shallow there. Snow melts on the steep part and water flows down under the snow to the unheated shallower roof where it refreezes and forms a dam anywhere on ...


8

I have a cape cod and the attic spaces formed by the knee walls gave me really bad ice dams and icicles. I made sure that these spaces had route for warm air to rise and escape however they were missing soffit vents. I added soffit vents and I haven't seen a single issue in three years. Ventilation is definitely going to help. You need to get that air ...


5

I would suggest a roof rake - like this. You would start about 3-4 feet up, crack through ice and then rake down. If you have a tall roof this becomes a safety issue and might need two people - one to secure ladder. It isn't easy work. Also if you can safely get on top of the roof it is much easier to push the snow off.


5

The suction line (the larger pipe) should never be iced up during normal operation. By the time the refrigerant gets to the end of the evaporator coil, it should be completely boiled off (in a gas state). The bottom few coils may frost up, but the top ones should only be sweating at most. If the suction line; or more than the bottom third of the coil, is ...


4

could be the cold has shrunk something, maybe rubber isolation, and the water was able to go around it (something like that caused the challenger explosion) could be the cold has cooled down the neighbours ceiling and the moisture in the room condensed there, like when you use air conditioning


4

The way to prevent ice damning is to prevent the snow on the roof from melting in the first place and that means adequate insulation and venting in the attic. If the insulation of your home is not adequate then warm air from the living space fills your attic and melts the snow on the roof, the melted water then run down the roof where it freezes over the ...


3

Mechanically removing ice is a great way to break your fridge. Stick to heat and time. Your fan appears to not be attached. That would be problem. Other than that, you either have a problem with the automatic defrost, or it was overwhelmed, perhaps by the lack of a happy fan causing more icing than it expected, or by excessive humidity. I have had a ...


3

1It is very wrong. You CANNOT have a cord passing through siding, walls, or any other finished structure/surface. For both code and safety reasons. The receptacle MUST be outside. If it is close to the heat tape you'll just need to coil the cord up. National Electrical Code 2011 Chapter 4 Equipment for General Use Article 400 Flexible Cords and Cables I. ...


3

The NYCOEM has no authority over NJ. I'm guessing you received the notice as part of an alert system you signed up form. Mailing list, twitter feed, etc. The reason it's important for people in NYC to clear their roofs is because roofs generally are right over the sidewalks. You don't want melting snow dripping on the walks and freezing or worse, having ...


3

I am a contractor specializing in snow control systems. Shirlock homes is correct in most of what he was explaining. If the cables are not installed correctly then you will have wasted your time and money on the project. I have seen heat cable projects put together by "professionals", as they call themselves, and the heat cable created more problems than ...


3

99% of the time there is (or should be) no need to remove snow from a roof that is properly built for the area it is in. "Properly built for the area it is in" should include the ability to hold up the expected maximum snow load for that area until it melts. As a side note, in new construction, it is often VERY affordable to add 10-20 pounds per square foot ...


3

I'm late to the game, but this is obviously frost due to condensation. Leaks would appear as icicles. I've witnessed this phenomenon personally in very cold climates, and it's often just the result of seasonal changes that leave moist air in place from warmer days. You may have a ventilation deficiency, but there's no evidence of roof leaks here, at least ...


3

There is no such device. However, when my step-son got married and had no ice maker in his refrigerator he asked us what he could do. I told him that we all used ice trays. when I was growing up. I was shocked when he asked us, "What's an ice tray?". I only mention this because I am not sure of your age. I am certainly not trying to be funny or offend.


2

I saw a roof rake on This Old House about a year ago that looked so simple, yet brilliant. Instead of having to scrape a little bit of snow at a time down to you or to push, this device slid a sheet of plastic between the roof and the snow so that one big column came down at one time. I don't have the need for one but it looked like a real time saver.


2

btw I have the same issue on my HE home furnace. and just by chance, the billing department manager at the furnace company I use has the same problem. I did see an online article which mentioned some solutions. NOTE that exhaust pipe condensate drainage is the first thing I noticed appropriate to my problem. '....http://bassetheating.com If you experience ...


2

This part of the foundation is most likely spreading out a roof load from a sizable portion of the sunroom roof. If the soil supporting the foundation has eroded away, this will need to be rectified some time next year. For now, get a bag of ready mix mortar, the kind you just add water to, it has sand and cement already mixed in in the correct proportion. ...


2

I think shinning an infrared heater on the steps would be quite cost effective and very easy. I have this $60 one in my garage and am impressed with the bag for the buck. Maybe the mounting point would allow you to use it to make the porch more enjoyable in the late fall / early spring and you only shine it on the step during the winter? If you want to ...


2

Electric cables can be fixed there very well. Let's say we use 2 mm thick cables with low wattage (10 W/m). Firstly you cut 2 mm wide and 3 mm deep cuts to the bottom side of your steps (using a hand circular saw). They should be parallel going from side to side. Put silicone and cables into the cut doing S bends, they should just fit in there. Cover the ...


2

You can pick up a cheap water pump that you can use to remove the water. If you have a Harbor Freight in your area, they have a good selection of cheap pumps. If your drain is metal, you can use a brush torch with a 15 pound propane tank to help remove the ice. Use it to help break up the ice. It will probably not be efficient to melt all of the ice. ...


2

I had problems on the south side of the house with the elbow and spouts coming out from the elbow at the ground level freezing up. Last winter I wrapped the bottom elbow and spout with black plastic bags and I had no freezing. You must brush the snow off of the black so the sun can do its job.I am thinking of painting the bottom elbow and spout flat black ...


2

Could the melting ice water have caused a permanent leak to have developed? (my emphasis) Leaks generally don't repair themselves. Since there is evidence of a leak, it is very likely this will recur. This means that the leak needs to be actively investigated and fixed to prevent further damage. You downstairs neighbor will probably get someone to repair ...


2

Like the OP said. "It's a sealed system." If it was a leak it wouldn't "remove heat" at all. (fridges don't cool, they remove heat.) Automotive AC's DO leak, slowly, because they use rubber hoses/lines. So forget about the "low refrigerant", that ain't it. The problem is one of three things. First (and most likely) the defrost ...


2

Longer overhangs could impact ice dam formation, but it does not seem to be a significant factor. As this page from the University of Minnesota outlines, heat loss through the roof is the big contributing factor. They even go further and say that air leakages around light fixtures and such on the ceiling of the top story are the biggest culprits. Nowhere on ...


2

I'm not a professional, and I have very little experience. But: Could you adjust the slope of your gutter? Currently, rain rolls north off the roof, gets to the gutter, half goes east and half goes west. If you lower the north-east corner of the gutter (and gently slope the whole gutter toward it) a majority of the rain would head down the east spout ...


2

We design heating cables into driveways and sidewalks for areas that can have an icy buildup and buildings that must have safe access, like medical clinics, hospitals, fire departments, etc. Also, high-end residents will often request it. Here’s a link for new or retrofit work: http://systems.warmquest.com/radiant-driveway-heating-systems/?gclid=...


2

Most have a wire bar that sits above the ice tray. As the ice cubes fill the tray, the bar is raised and eventually raises high enough to shut off the icemaker. The bar must be DOWN for ice to be produced. Or, there's a control somewhere that needs to be selected. Probably in the refrigerator (not freezer) compartment. Knowing the model would help.


2

Those foam blocks look like shipping blocks to me, not normally left in place. Once defrosted will this happen again? There are a few possibilities, a fan that circulates the air failing is one possibility and a second is a defrost timer failure can also cause this. I would check and see if the fridge is still under warranty. But if those foam blocks are ...


2

Yes, water damages wood and salty water damages it faster. If at all possible do not use ice-melting salts on wood decks. If you must, wash it off and let the deck try as soon as possible afterward. Keep your coatings refreshed.


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