2

If your numbers are accurate (that seems like a shockingly low price per therm for 2020): 10.57 cents buys you 13,989.2 BTU at a COP of 4.1 in the heat pump. 14.14 cents buys you 96,700 btu in the furnace, or 95,000 in the boiler. A dollar buys you 132,348 BTU at the heat pump, or 671,852 at the boiler, or 683,875 at the furnace ("heating fuel cost"...


2

Yes, that is how modern hydronic heating systems are commonly set up. The main pipes are called the "primary loop" and each set of smaller piping to the radiators is called a "secondary loop". (The technique has been around since at least the 1950's, but it used to be limited mostly to commercial buildings. Its use in residential systems ...


2

Can't tell from looking at the picture you posted but it looks like a finned tube hot water baseboard unit. Do you heat your house with a hot water boiler and if not can you elaborate. If I am right and that is a hot water unit, the installer recessed the enclosure into the wall and mounted it directly onto the wall studs. I never liked that type of ...


1

The problem with one pump and valves is that you can't ensure that you always get the flow you want when one of the valves is closed vs. both open. So things can be difficult to balance. With two pumps there is more control and you should get more even heating. Unless you have a strong reason to do it another way, I recommend you take the advice of the ...


1

I think it functions as a filter to keep the growing media from making its way to the lower level. The holes would be smaller then the media, the holes allow the water to drain out but not the media. (the "media" in this case are the small clay balls that hold the roots of the plants in suspension facilitating an oxygenated water environment.)


1

I turned off both valves 1 & 2 figuring it isolated most things and valve 2 didn't seem to close all the way. The steps I used to drain were: turn supply off turn return off open hose bibb open bleeder valve on register farthest away. If you don't do this, it seems to drain very slowly. When refilling/purging, it seemed to go better/faster if that ...


1

Your idea probably won't work correctly to begin with Your proposed setup probably won't even work quite right, whether you use old-style mechanical thermostats or new-style "smart" thermostats. With two-pole mechanical 'stats (such as the Honeywell CT410B), only one pole is thermostatic as a general rule, with the other pole simply being a ...


1

Maybe I am missing something here but the entire loop will still be in the room so there will be heat in the wall And the floor with a longer loop. but my concern would be air trapped in this loop could kill the loop if you don’t have flow restrictors on your manifold.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible