New answers tagged

1

A warm water net which is not used for months can become a breeding ground for a zoo of dangerous bacterias (especially for older people, people with reduced immune response etc.), among which legionellas are not the only kind. Even after heating up (minimum 60°C for 10 minutes) and flushing the complete warm water net, the cold water lines could be still ...


4

Unless you have been deliberately avoiding the hot on your taps/valves while you had only cold water, you have probably run water though more than you think - but perhaps you have. Might depend on your valve types. I know I usually end up in the middle of my one-lever valves when the water heater is off, and at that point the water heater looks like a wide ...


8

OK, so you have a 3-loop system. The inner loop is freon, for the heat pump. The intermediate loop is service water (or antifreeze) which you heat/store in a 300l (80 gal) tank. Then you use the hot service water in a heat-exchanger to do on-demand heating of potable hot water, which is delivered to a faucet. (sure, some insulation will be added when I ...


6

As mentioned by others, the tubes should be insulated to reduce the thermoflow and losses in general. If the thermosiphon is not directly installed close to the tank's in- and outlet, the uninsulated tubes/hoses from those tank connection up to the thermosiphon will work like a room heater. This free forum (in German) has very good technical information ...


4

You need to prevent thermo-siphoning. "Heat traps" is a common term for the preventative measures, and there are several approaches - check valves that pump flow will open but which don't open at thermosiphoning pressures, as well as actual "plumbing trap" style u-bends. Without getting a very good overall sense of your system from the ...


4

Easy, increase the depth of that loop, we had a similar issue and need about a 4ft drop to stop the thermosyphon.


1

You didn't state the size of the existing WH but like others have said, if it's small, like 40 gallons, upsize to the largest tank type you can find...hopefully at least 80 ga. The other thing you could try that's not very expensive is to install a mixing valve and turn up the temp on the WH quite high, like 150 or so. The mixing valve would reduce the ...


1

You'll want to get a good (read: split system) heat pump water heater There's really only one way to go for mass quantity hot water in an all-electric house like yours, and that's a split system heat pump water heater. These use a mini-split-sized outdoor unit to heat water and pump it over to a storage tank located inside the house, and provide much ...


0

Your little series heater would need to pass two tests: if your existing tank becomes fully cold, and your existing heater is nevertheless able to heat the water "instantly" by even say ten degrees, your new second heater would need to further heat the water enough to be useful. It seems very unlikely, I suspect your existing heater would do ...


0

Even a 3 GPM tankless will use a lot of power. A quick search finds that would be on the order of 60 Amps! That's a lot of power. It is physically small, but not electrically. In addition, dasiy-chaining tanked and tankless is technically easy but in practice may not work so well for a bunch of reasons. A typical house will have a minimum 40 gallon heater. ...


1

There is no magic to this. Your most straightforward solution (without excessively costly upgrades to your electric power service) to an absurdly undersized storage tank water heater is a correctly sized storage tank water heater for your needs. In the current era, that would likely be a "hybrid heat pump" system for efficiency and because you can'...


0

If you have a modern shower valve with an "anti-scald" feature and are shutting off the water with the shower shut off valve, then turning the water back on is setting up transient swings until the system settles down again. I know these shutoff valves can save water, but I don't think modern shower valves work with them properly. Note that when ...


7

Let's flesh this into an answer. This happens with my kitchen faucet and one of those "quick-flip - not quite total shutoff" valves that screw into the aerator. My guess is that some hot leaks back into the cold pipes, (the control valve is open, the shutoff beyond the control valve is closed) so the mix is not the same temperature as it was until ...


1

Air vents in hot water circulation systems are, or should be, located at high points (sometimes local high points) in the system. They are pretty much never right at the pump, in my experience. Depending where the hot water loop runs, the appropriate vents might be on the other side of the house, or two stories above the pump. There is usually one near the ...


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