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Cap it off at the disconnect Hot tubs, by and large, are single-voltage, 208/240V loads, connecting to two hots and a ground. As a result, you'll want to simply cap off (insulate) the neutral at the local disconnect using a wirenut of the correct size. There's no sense in bringing it further, nor do you need to provision a pole for switching it, so a bog-...


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Neutral should not be switched. Ideally the disconnect box supports a neutral bar, but if not a suitable wire nut or any other code compliant wire connection method for in-box connections is suitable. 50A is not a small amount, though, so I'd shy away from wire nuts, as you should be using a 6 awg wire. Putting two of those into a wire nut requires a ...


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Keeping the GFCI indoors will cut the cost of a GFCI disconnect but be prepared to shell out some bucks for indoor GFCI. It's a great idea to still run the neutral, you never know when you might want to change out that cheap disconnect with a little subpanel (think about it). You would just cap the neutral in your disconnect box with a wire nut and leave it ...


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You never switch the neutral, well, "never" is a strong word, sometimes some special generator installations switch the neutral, but almost never should you switch the neutral, just the 2 hots. I like your idea of putting the GFCI inside to protect it. To connect the neutral, there is usually a small bussbar you can land those on. If your new hot ...


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You don’t give all the required information, but I’ll make some assumptions and you tell me where I’m wrong. I’m going to assume the water is 3’ deep. Water weighs about 62 lbs. per cubic foot so the water in the tub will weigh a total of: 7’-10” x 9’-2” x (62 x 3’ deep) = 13,400# I did not add weight for equipment because I assume there are cutouts for ...


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The two open slots at the top right-hand side of the breakers looks from the photos as though it can handle a double breaker needed for 230V. So from what you've shown the answer appears to be yes.


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I got an electric shock whilst in a Lay-Z-Spa Vegas. It was leaking from the thermostat housing, with water leaking and dripping on the heater causing a short to travel through the water pipe. I took the top of the thermostat housing and found the square rubber seal split. I used silicone caulk to repair the seal and refitted it. No more leaks, no more ...


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