Hot answers tagged

46

Edit: This is sounding more and more like a problem with either a neighbor's electrical or the utility's supply. See last entry. DON'T get in that hot tub again! The "very small" shock was due to high impedance between you and the current. Impedance is extremely luck-based. Someone getting out of the pool might splash water where it had not been before, ...


38

I think you have likely answered your own question. The use of an extension cord could cause a voltage drop, especially since the factory cord is long already and the spa probably has an electric motor that would be damaged by voltage drop. Also, cord/plug connections are not weatherproof. This is a CYA (cover-your-arse) by the manufacturer. Your plan of ...


30

The basic reason is that if they said, "Feel free to use an extension cord", someone would connect up a 50m, 3A, two-core cable with no Earth and a loose socket. They would then sue the company when it didn't work (too much voltage drop across long thin extension cables) or it caught fire (current drawn exceeds capability of thin extension cables) or they ...


15

I had an electrician to check out the problem and: I am in the UK and there is only live and neutral at the meter (earth and neutral are the same wire at that point) The Hot Tub water is directly conncted to Earth The mains electrics in my property all checked out fine, incoming supply fine. No faults with the Hob Tub RCD's tested and working He is ...


9

I have always heard that the reason for the "no extension chords" is because they are not supposed to be used for permanent installations, only temporary, i.e., Christmas lights. Extension chords are pretty cheaply made and the ones I have had fail on me always fail at either the male or female end. If you're going to keep your tub inflated year-round, think ...


8

The manufacturer will be guarding against both voltage drop on the supply (which could affect the operation) and creating too high a fault loop impedance (which could affect the disconnect time of the circuit breaker in case of a fault). At a guess, a minimum length, heavy duty extension lead will likely be fine. However, for peace of mind, if you can ...


8

The issue is electrical drownings One thing people really don't understand about electricity and water: a shock that would be trivial anywhere else is fatal when water is around. You're hit with a triple whammy. First, ordinary water and wet skin conduct electricity well, meaning a shock you barely felt before, now has much worse effect. "Water doesn'...


6

I have seen the same rules on devices for a bathroom. In my opinion its all about exposing bare wires. If the two (the extension and the power cord) are not a waterproof connection and resting on a floor (very common), then there is risk of shock. That is far more likely in a bathroom (or near a hottub) where water is common. I believe a better way is to ...


5

Connect the white wire to the bar the other white wires are connected to -- it is not rare for a main service panel to have a combined neutral and ground busbar, as that is the (only!) point where neutral and ground connect.


5

The panel can indeed support a 240V breaker. The question you should ask is, is there space in the panel to physically accommodate additional breakers? Based on the model number, your panel should look something like this. Notice how this example image has lots of blank spaces. In a panel like this, there's no problem at all installing a new breaker (or ...


5

Adding a weather proof box at the tub is legal.


5

To Avoid Fire As noted in other answers and comments, there are issues related to wire size and length that can cause overheating if not appropriately dealt with, and the issue of waterproofing the connection, both that can lead to shorts and fires. So You and Your Family and Your Friends Don't Die A person, just out of the hot tub, is covered with water, ...


5

You never switch the neutral, well, "never" is a strong word, sometimes some special generator installations switch the neutral, but almost never should you switch the neutral, just the 2 hots. I like your idea of putting the GFCI inside to protect it. To connect the neutral, there is usually a small bussbar you can land those on. If your new hot ...


5

You can, yes (provided you respect conduit fill limits), but usually there's an easier way. Since hot tubs need a local disconnect anyway, you can use a small subpanel (often called a spa panel) to supply both the hot tub and the outlet, and that will also serve as the disconnect. Just make sure to get one with more than two breaker spaces. Here's an ...


5

I'd be cautious building something like this with limited woodworking experience. Typical framing like this would have 1/2" bolts and your rough sketch is similar to other stable gantries. I see this a lot in Florida where people have partially below grade hot tubes and need to raise them for drain and piping replacement. Renting a gantry seems to be ...


5

According to the brochure for the Square D QO 90 Amp Breaker it can handle 4 AWG to 2/0 AWG, so yes. And thanks to NoSparksPlease, Homeline too.


4

TL;DR: Yes, your panel should accommodate the breaker, provided you have space. Quick lesson in North American circuitry. The supply to your house is 240 v, split phase. This means that there are 3 wires coming in. One is 120v, one is grounded, and one is 120 v, out of phase with the first. If we switch our thinking to DC, you could (incorrectly) ...


4

If you're going to leave the breaker, you could just shut it off and/or disconnect the wires connected to it. Installing a lockout on the breaker, would prevent anybody from turning it on. You should be able to buy a lockout in the electrical department of your local big box home improvement store for less than $10, though you may have to supply your own ...


4

After pulling the motor out (which required draining the spa and disconnecting the PVC connections) and removing the cover, I found another capacitor. Googling the part number indicates that this is a start capacitor. It helps the motor start. The motor also has a capacitor on the outside, and it's the run capacitor. That's the one that was replaced ...


4

Fill it on Friday, and use it all weekend. On Monday you chlorinate it, and let it sit chlorinated all week. This will prevent bacterial growth from taking over your filter. Drain and refill on Friday before the weekend, and don't add chlorine. Once you're done using it for the weekend, add chlorine. Rinse and repeat next Friday before the weekend. I ...


4

A spa pump motor is usually what's called a "C face" design, meaning that the motor mounts directly to the pump, which is what mounts to the spa. When you take it off of the pump, you have no mounting feet, so no way to hold it to your bench. So yes, you can use a spa pump motor for other things, but it will require some substantial mechanical engineering to ...


4

PVC to liquidtight works, but with a caveat or two The good news is that it's possible to transition from a PVC conduit to liquidtight flexible conduit without too much work. However, you can only do it from a spigot (male) end. This primarily means you can't use a LB to make the 90° bend at the hot tub end without having to use a nipple of PVC to adapt ...


4

Normally wiring like this could go into a GFCI disconnect and directly into a prewired hot tub. If you purchased individual parts, then you would go to a sub panel adding separate GFCI breakers for the heater and motor, etc.. Unfortunately the wiring provided is only good for 240 Volt,30 Amps. Two 30 Amp breakers do not equal a 60 Amp service. It will not ...


4

Disclosure: I'm not an engineer. Good drawing; we can see what you're thinking of. The structure and foundation supporting the tub must be sturdy enough to support the weight of the tub, water, and users, and to resist any tendency that it tip over (it's way up in the air), or collapse downward, or twist, or shear. The mass and density are vastly larger than ...


3

Neutral and ground are kept separate absolutely everywhere, except one place: the main panel. Here, it is OK to simply use one bus for both neutral and ground. You will probably find a lot of whites and a lot of bare wires going to the same bus. That's the one. Just for reference, DON'T do this in a sub-panel or you can create a lethal hazard.


3

In my area if the cable is for future use the current carrying conductors in the panel board must be capped and marked for future use. The ground conductor if bare secured to the ground buss, if insulated capped. The conductors at the other end must be in a box and capped. I have lived and worked in 4 states and all 4 had different rules. 1 required future ...


3

I've done it. Just do three horizontal bands around the outside of 2 x 6 on flat, not on edge. So the nominal 2" dimension faces are vertical and the nominal 6 inch dimension faces are horizontal. Overlap the 2 x 6's at the corners and thru-bolt them with 3/8" bolts, with big washers -- 4 bolts to each corner of each tier of 2 x 6. Then build your stud ...


3

@Steven is essentially right. What has been explained many times on this site is that there is NOTHING dangerous about what you propose. The 50A breaker will be protecting the wiring to the tub (and internals of the tub). The 60A breaker is protecting the wiring to the subpanel (and its internals). You can do this if you want and you will be ...


3

I can find nothing in the National Electrical Code to prevent you from doing this. It is the hot tub that is required to be at least 5' away from the disconnect. 680.12 Maintenance Disconnecting Means. One or more means to simultaneously disconnect all ungrounded conductors shall be provided for all utilization equipment other than lighting. Each means ...


3

Looks to me like it needs both 120V and 240V. The 120 is likely for the water pump and controls while the 240 is for the water heater. Here is a typical wiring diagram for a SPA. As for what the various current ratings are for on the 240 it is difficult to know without more information. Different heaters for different sized units perhaps, or different ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible