Hot answers tagged

44

Edit: This is sounding more and more like a problem with either a neighbor's electrical or the utility's supply. See last entry. DON'T get in that hot tub again! The "very small" shock was due to high impedance between you and the current. Impedance is extremely luck-based. Someone getting out of the pool might splash water where it had not been before, ...


13

I had an electrician to check out the problem and: I am in the UK and there is only live and neutral at the meter (earth and neutral are the same wire at that point) The Hot Tub water is directly conncted to Earth The mains electrics in my property all checked out fine, incoming supply fine. No faults with the Hob Tub RCD's tested and working He is ...


10

You need to calculate the outward force. Assume 8' x 8' x 3' hot tub, filled to the top. 3 ft of head * 0.424 * 1(specific gravity of water) = 1.302 psi That's the pressure at the bottom. Obviously the pressure at the top is 0. If I were to sketch the pressure gradient, it would be a triangle, so we can easily calculate the average pressure as 1.302 /2 = ...


7

As others have pointed out, a square timber-framed hot tub is going to be a structural challenge. You're essentially building an above-ground pool--and you'll notice that they don't make above-ground pools in a square shape... mostly because it's nearly impossible to support the water along the long edges. The solution is to go round. Then you can use ...


5

The panel can indeed support a 240V breaker. The question you should ask is, is there space in the panel to physically accommodate additional breakers? Based on the model number, your panel should look something like this. Notice how this example image has lots of blank spaces. In a panel like this, there's no problem at all installing a new breaker (or ...


5

Connect the white wire to the bar the other white wires are connected to -- it is not rare for a main service panel to have a combined neutral and ground busbar, as that is the (only!) point where neutral and ground connect.


5

Adding a weather proof box at the tub is legal.


4

If you're going to leave the breaker, you could just shut it off and/or disconnect the wires connected to it. Installing a lockout on the breaker, would prevent anybody from turning it on. You should be able to buy a lockout in the electrical department of your local big box home improvement store for less than $10, though you may have to supply your own ...


4

After pulling the motor out (which required draining the spa and disconnecting the PVC connections) and removing the cover, I found another capacitor. Googling the part number indicates that this is a start capacitor. It helps the motor start. The motor also has a capacitor on the outside, and it's the run capacitor. That's the one that was replaced ...


4

If you're simply framing up a hot tub. It's not likely a structure like this will contain the water, since the water will not only be applying force downward, but also outward in all directions. Some form of banding would be a start to increasing the strength. The banding may not be strong enough to overcome the forces, so bracing may also be required. I'...


4

TL;DR: Yes, your panel should accommodate the breaker, provided you have space. Quick lesson in North American circuitry. The supply to your house is 240 v, split phase. This means that there are 3 wires coming in. One is 120v, one is grounded, and one is 120 v, out of phase with the first. If we switch our thinking to DC, you could (incorrectly) ...


4

Fill it on Friday, and use it all weekend. On Monday you chlorinate it, and let it sit chlorinated all week. This will prevent bacterial growth from taking over your filter. Drain and refill on Friday before the weekend, and don't add chlorine. Once you're done using it for the weekend, add chlorine. Rinse and repeat next Friday before the weekend. I ...


3

I've done it. Just do three horizontal bands around the outside of 2 x 6 on flat, not on edge. So the nominal 2" dimension faces are vertical and the nominal 6 inch dimension faces are horizontal. Overlap the 2 x 6's at the corners and thru-bolt them with 3/8" bolts, with big washers -- 4 bolts to each corner of each tier of 2 x 6. Then build your stud ...


3

@Steven is essentially right. What has been explained many times on this site is that there is NOTHING dangerous about what you propose. The 50A breaker will be protecting the wiring to the tub (and internals of the tub). The 60A breaker is protecting the wiring to the subpanel (and its internals). You can do this if you want and you will be ...


3

Neutral and ground are kept separate absolutely everywhere, except one place: the main panel. Here, it is OK to simply use one bus for both neutral and ground. You will probably find a lot of whites and a lot of bare wires going to the same bus. That's the one. Just for reference, DON'T do this in a sub-panel or you can create a lethal hazard.


3

Looks to me like it needs both 120V and 240V. The 120 is likely for the water pump and controls while the 240 is for the water heater. Here is a typical wiring diagram for a SPA. As for what the various current ratings are for on the 240 it is difficult to know without more information. Different heaters for different sized units perhaps, or different ...


3

GFCI is not a receptacle or breaker. It is a zone of protection provided by the GFCI device. It protects everything down the line from the GFCI device. Sometimes the GFCI device itself has a couple of convenience outlets that are on the protected side: a GFCI+receptacle combo device. This is what you mean when you casually say "GFCI", because this is ...


3

Now the odd thing is that even with the socket switched off (but still plugged in) it still reads 2Vac. If I unplug the socket it reads 0Vac. How is it reading 2Vac with only neural and earth wires connected? By ground wire not being at 0Vac. Typically this would be caused by problems elsewhere in your home, such as an appliance drawing high amount of ...


2

I see free hot tubs on craigslist every week. 1/4 of them the ad says they work. Why not use the free shell, motor, heater, controls and custom make the outside.


2

Regardless of what all the individual breakers add up to, the maximum you can draw through that subpanel is 60amps. Realistically you want to be a bit lower then that to allow for some spikes. To determine if you can support the tub, you need to take a measurement of the current (amps) on the circuit with some or all of the existing devices in use (i.e. ...


2

3.15A is indeed an appropriate value for a BUSS GMA 5x20mm fuse. Chances are something else is blown out. If you're not up to doing component level troubleshooting, probably a board will have to be replaced. One part that frequently takes the brunt of power surges is MOV (varistor) devices, which look like big (often red or blue) ceramic disk capacitors. ...


2

Yes, you can use this. GFCI breakers combine two different functions into one device. The circuit breaker function of the device is rated for 50 amps. However, because your 15 amp breaker is upstream from the GFCI, your circuit is protected at 15 amps, and will trip at 15 amps if there is a fault either before or after your GFCI. The GFCI function on the ...


2

In my area if the cable is for future use the current carrying conductors in the panel board must be capped and marked for future use. The ground conductor if bare secured to the ground buss, if insulated capped. The conductors at the other end must be in a box and capped. I have lived and worked in 4 states and all 4 had different rules. 1 required future ...


2

I don't think I've ever seen something that when the manufacture provides you with the circuit size to connect it to, either literally or implied by the factory installed plug type, it isn't at least 125% of the most it will draw. Often times if the device, appliance, machine or whatever it is, only slightly exceeds 80% of the next smaller circuit size, in ...


2

Double 2x8's spanning 10' @ 16" O.C. can barely support 160 PSF (safely) if they are douglas fir and the spa is centered on the joist. 150 PSF over ~50 Sq. Ft. would be about 7,500 lb. As for your end beams, (3) 2x10's spanning 7' would support the weight of the joist ends with a 1.5 sq. ft. footing on each end of the beams; 4 total. Just to stiffen ...


2

It's threaded; odds are good you don't have sufficient leverage if you're trying by hand. I'd suggest a large pair of water pump pliers, which are a fair bit more useful to have around than a large pipe wrench. You're less likely to bust anything with pliers too.


2

Try a channel lock type pliers on the fitting, front center of the picture. Open the jaws so when you grip the plastic part with the serrated edges you do not squeeze or distort the plastic piece that you are trying to turn. First try to turn this part "down" which will Tighten the joint, just slightly to break the seal, then upwards to un-thread (remove) ...


2

I can find nothing in the National Electrical Code to prevent you from doing this. It is the hot tub that is required to be at least 5' away from the disconnect. 680.12 Maintenance Disconnecting Means. One or more means to simultaneously disconnect all ungrounded conductors shall be provided for all utilization equipment other than lighting. Each means ...


2

Cedar is often used for outdoor and other wet locations because of its high tannin content. Tannins are natural compounds that prevent bacterial and fungal decomposition (rot). When used in exterior applications, such as home siding, cedar is often protected with oil stains or varnishes. This is primarily to protect from sun damage, which dries out the ...


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