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24

What you see there is a vacuum breaker spigot with its pants down. You'll need to try and procure the parts or just replace the whole works. More on that


17

That is not a standard garden hose fitting. Instead it looks to be part of a anti-siphon adapter where the other part was unscrewed to reveal the inner section of the unit. The regular hose thread coupling would have been on the down stream part of the missing part. It will be unlikely that you can find just half of a anti-siphon adapter that would screw on ...


14

That style of clamp can be or has been used to compress or close soft tubes or pipes in many situations like drip feed water supply to plants as a simple example.


12

It's possible to get the hose screwed on by hand tightly enough that it won't leak if your grip is strong enough; I think the strength required is within the normal range for an adult (mine is relatively strong though, so your mileage may vary). But before you get a wrench, there's a couple of things you should check: make sure the threads on the faucet and ...


10

The best thing is to use rigid ducts instead of flexible ducts. A little harder to install as you have to figure out (and possibly do some cutting) exactly what pieces to use for your specific installation, and typically you need to attach several pieces together instead of one long tube. But avoids a lot of the issues of lint collecting inside every "...


9

It's called "a very short hose". :) You can make your own with parts commonly available at hardware and big-box stores. Alternatively, install a simple valve, an elbow, or a backflow preventer: Be aware that extending a plastic connection with a rigid part adds torque stress to that connection. Use caution to not lever on it.


8

If the leak is around the threads themselves (you can tell vs gasket based on where water comes out), teflon tape (sometimes called plumber's tape) exists for this. It's readily available at hardware and home improvement stores, and very inexpensive. Just wrap it around the faucet threads a few time and screw the hose on and it will make a good seal. It's ...


7

I would expect more water to flow unless you have extremely low water pressure. You have a 3/4" line and all the water pressure of either a municipal water system or a water pump. Splitting that into two lines will not likely double the flow rate as there is a pressure drop, but it should increase the total flow rate considerably. I would expect it to almost ...


7

There are garden hose splice devices that you can purchase at home centers and big box stores that can be used to fix these. You may lose a short bit of total length as you cut off the damaged part to accomodate the splicer. If you need more added length you could use two of these splicers to stitch in a new length of hose. They also sell devices that ...


7

I have something like this and it works just fine. (I have only one soaker hose in each bed, and both soakers are the same size.) The flow rate involved is very slow, so the hose and connector sizes cause no interference. The pressure will be the same throughout.


6

I'm going to assume that there's not a trap inside the wall, but if I'm wrong please correct me. You're going to want to build a standpipe. Start by installing a P-trap into that pipe in the wall. It's hard to tell from the picture what type of pipe it is, but you'll want to use something compatible to make the connection between pipe and trap. From the ...


6

Instead of a threaded connector go for a quick disconnect. The connectors will screw on the existing threads and you can then connect by pushing in and disconnect bu pulling the tab.


6

Based on other answers and comments, I'm hoping I can provide some help by bringing together some of the relevant information into one answer. How it works As @user1289451 pointed out, the "screw" is technically a worm gear. However, instead of the threads on the worm turning a gear, it is advancing the band by engaging the slots and moving the band ...


6

The other answer is a good starting point. However you may want to look at using this style of spring hose clamp. They exert their pressure over a greater area of the hose and depending upon the hose material prevent cracking of the hose material as it ages.


5

Garden hose gasket, do you have one? They like to fall out and get lost, and without one it can become nearly impossible to tighten the connection up hard enough to prevent leakage.


5

I have had good luck getting these fittings to release with an open end wrench. Slide a wrench the same size as the outside diameter of the tubing over the tubing. Then use it to push in the release collar. It works well in tight areas or where the fittings are close together. If you have to replace any tubing a clean cut is required to get a good seal.


5

When discharging directly into a waste system without a standpipe, the connections must be "tight", as with a hose clamp to an appropriately sized tube connector, as shown in the manufacturer's instructions. The standpipe method is better (in my opinion) when connecting to existing waste systems with unknown capacity, because the standpipe can be sized to ...


5

I suspect you're seeing the result of poorly-translated product descriptions from China and elsewhere. For example: Advantages: Withdrawing life greatly improved. Should not damage the leaking. The inner tube using the nylon braided package EPDM more resistant wound. Honory99 1.5m Pull-type Copper Core Explosion-proof Shower Hose This product would ...


5

Hose clamps like this are made to clamp, but they are not made to un-clamp so easily - instead, as you have observed, the worm-drive screw tends to un-screw out of its housing when turned anti-clockwise. The way I loosen the clamp in this situation is to first snug the clamp using the screw - we are not wanting to make the clamp tighter, but simply to get a ...


5

Use a wire spring type hose clamp. They make them in many sizes, including 1/8". They work well initially and have the added benefit of applying constant tension even if the hose softens or shrinks (as opposed to a zip-tie or worm-drive hose clamp).


5

Those knobs are indeed quarter turn shut off valves. They have probably not been turned in years and have buildup of mineral deposits inside or some other type of corrosion. The shutoff valves are there to allow it to be easy to attach / replace the washer water hoses. Before trying to see if you can free them up you will have to figure out how to turn ...


4

It's a quick-connect t-fitting, not a valve. You should be able to push down on the little lip at each connection and pull the hose loose. Or you can just cut each hose and replace it with a new fitting. You just push the hose in until it clicks and you're done.


4

Since you already have to dig it up to fix it, don't bother trying to repair the crack. Cut out and replace the damaged section of pipe. Use a coupling suitable for the type of pipe you are working with and that is rated for burial.


4

It is a "push-to-connect" fitting. You disconnect by pushing the tube, pushing the gray ring, then (while still pushing the gray ring) pulling the tube:


4

"what is the justification for not including them as a matter of course?" there are numerous choices when it comes to type and length of hose. Cheaper rubber hoses, more expensive stainless steel braided jacket rubber hoses, lengths from 4' to 12' long, etc. "Can old fill hoses be reused? If not, why not?" They certainly can be reused. If you are ...


4

One of several things is probably happening: The clamp has corroded or gunked in place, so you'll have to continue turning the screw until opening force is applied to the grooves cut into the clamp band, popping the band's bond to itself and the pipe. The screw threads are stripped and not engaging the grooves in the band. In this case, a rotary tool and ...


4

Aside from the fact that I don’t think it would be allowed by code it would be inconvenient and if there was ever a problem with the mechanics inside your machine and water started spewing out all over your floor you wouldn’t have a way to shut it off or disconnected easily. Trying to save money now may cost you more money in the long run. Buy stainless ...


4

The other answers give good advice without actually answering your question. Have you considered cutting two holes in a shoebox and feeding the duct through the holes?


4

If you really must have the dryer where it is, and drape the duct like that, then buy some flexible ducting as used for wood burners. It's quite easy to bend around, but the wall is a lot stronger than what you have there. It's designed in part to be an insert in chimneys. That's the answer to the question, but not the answer to your problem. That's to re-...


4

You haven't specified how long of a run each section is so if you need very fine control of water flow then install a Y-splitter with ball valves at the spigot and run a dedicated hose to each garden bed. This will eliminate the problem of uncontrollable over/under watering. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Melnor-4-Way-Hose-Faucet-Connection-9009/202881087


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