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28

Any glass intended for a kitchen is almost certainly tempered. You cannot modify tempered glass. It will explode or disintegrate. Even if it's not, you're unlikely to be successful without specialized tools and training. You also wouldn't go grinding away at the finished end of your cabinet. That would make a real mess with no easy remedy. Unless you ...


18

Glass does not take well to sanding, cutting, etc. It can be done, but not so easily. It is even harder on an assembled large object, as opposed to large flat sheets. On the other hand, wood and similar materials (e.g., products made from various combinations of wood fibers, glue, etc.) can handle sanding very well, with minimal loss of strength and ...


14

If the hood is this kind of arrangement, basically a pair of glass wings extending from a central machine .... my suggestion is return it and buy something different. No matter what you do it's going to look awful. There needs to be a wide gap, as shown here, between the hood and the cabinets so you can clean them both. Otherwise you'll get black gunk ...


10

Squeezing the extractor duct to fit into the hood shouldn't cause an issue unless you bent the fan housing and it's binding. Check that the fan spins freely and also check your electrical connections, one might have vibrated loose. Check the fan to switch connectors as well, they are usually spade connectors and could have started working loose during ...


9

The biggest issue you have venting into the attic is warm, moist air being blown into a somewhat closed area (aside from the grease and particles you have a filter for). If the attic space you vent into is large, and has good ventilation this shouldn't be an issue. If you have to vent into a small portion of the attic and it looks like the moist air will ...


7

The three most important things in venting a kitchen is Ductwork, Ductwork, and Ductwork. I'm beginning to find out the hard way after replacing several builders' quality range hoods with stainless steel units that are more "sealed" and easier to clean. But in the process of setting them up, I'm seeing that ALL under-cabinet range hoods from virtually ALL ...


7

If it's a recirculator there will be vents on the front of the unit, and when it is running you will feel air coming out of those. If it's an extractor there will be a pipe between 3 and 6 inches in diameter (wide) coming out of it. Typically you will see this in the cabinet above the extractor, if you have a cabinet there but sometimes it can go to the ...


5

There's mentions in other posts of all sorts of changes to the glass, squeezing it in, temporarily moving the cabinets, etc. Do not compress or attempt to modify the glass in any way The glass contains invisible, but carefully and balanced stresses within it; watch the 10s segment from the marked time here https://youtu.be/j16GD0xzkhk?t=126 to see a very ...


4

A 2 piece shelf is a good plan, but my scheme differs from yours from there. Yours would work, but mine's better (IMO). Instead of plywood, I would use MDF. It's dimensionally stable, easy to work, and paints up very nicely with a very smooth surface. I would cut a circular hole to fit the duct closely so small things don't fall into the void below. ...


4

You also have to take into account the ducting run and turns, which derate the air flow. I have a 400cfm exhaust fan in my overhead uwave, and it works fine on the lowest of the 5 settings.I have 6 inch ducting that runs about 15 feet with one 90 degree turn. I also clean the ducting regularly by boiling vinegar on the stove for a few minutes per month, and ...


3

I think you were wise to turn off the power to be on the safe side. I also agree that the simplest thing would be to turn off the power to the hood, or safely disconnect the wiring to the hood, until you can get it repaired or replaced. Turning off the breaker for the stove may or may not turn off power to the hood. It's almost certain that turning ...


3

Never seen one like this - BUT have installed many a hood in cabinets where the vent did not end up exiting the center of the cabinet. a combination of adjustable elbows will offset the vent if you have at least 15" height in the cabinet. As a last resort flexible aluminum duct could be used but only if you have no other options.


3

Your condo violates Code and is unsafe, and your HOA consists of idiots First off -- your condo's existing setup, with a recirculating hood over a domestic gas appliance, is quite clearly a Code violation and a flagrant safety hazard, as IFGC 503.3 strictly prohibits the recirculation of gas appliance exhaust due to the unacceptable CO buildup that would ...


3

Sounds like this is still under warranty. Contact the manufacturer; the info should be in the user's manual.


3

As many have mentioned the exhaust duct needs to be sized properly, I have seen folks spend a lot on higher cfm fans that did no better because the root problem was the home was sealed so no air could get in to efficiently allow the hood to do its job. Try opening a window and see if the hood works better. If no change the duct may be two small, if the hood ...


3

From the comments: I haven't replaced the charcoal filters in several years That is very possibly the key right there. Just like a clothes dryer won't work properly if the lint trap is clogged, and just like a HVAC system won't work properly if the air filter is clogged, and just like your car engine won't work properly if the air filter is clogged, your ...


3

Use your exhaust fan. It removes grease, products of combustion and most of all moisture. Do you just never use your stove top? I suppose if all you ever do is microwave and use your oven you don't need to. You can fill the gap with roxul insulation which is fire proof. Typically your exhaust fan venting will lead to the exterior wall which has a wall ...


3

Check your local building codes to be 100% sure but PVC is NOT permitted by many. I'll reference one from TX but most are similar where it says: M1503.2 Duct Material Ducts serving range hoods shall be constructed of galvanized steel, stainless steel or copper. Regarding size, I believe you'll find that your local codes also require adhering to ...


3

You can rent a "fog machine" or "smoke (not really smoke) generator" at a rental place that caters to "party supplies" - you can also rent a portable ventilation fan with a flexible duct. Set the fan to blow in the suspect duct and run the fog machine at its intake. If you have smoke alarms, be aware that the smoke/fog may set ...


3

Yes, cold weather and hardened, cold grease buildup can conspire to stop your fan from starting. That's "the answer to the question you asked." The fact that you have enough grease buildup to keep the fan from starting when it's cold means that it needs to be cleaned, and possibly lubricated. That can be a DIY job, or a different, specialized ...


3

The vent straps are normally use when flex duct is connected to rigid duct so you're fine. There shouldn't be sheet metal screws used where the rigid is connected to the rigid. The seams are taped so that's good too.


2

I just finished updating my kitchen and I think you have to really be careful of going to far in either direction with sizing a range hood. Most places that don't have a fancy range hood are probably lucky to have 100cfm hood. I looked at all of the information I could and what I found was that while the minimums are something to pay attention to, you have ...


2

Nobody else will ever notice it. You'll forget about it in a week, unless you let it drive you insane, which will result in everybody feeling bad, since the tile guy is unlikely to see one corner of the range hood being 2mm offset from the opposite one as remotely within the realm of a sensible customer complaint. If this will drive you mad, I recommend ...


2

Something is super fishy here, LED's usually require a bit more than 1V especially the "lighting" ones. There are no "Bulbs" in LED's. LED's have very very long lifespans. I don't know LED's failure mode, but I don't think it's usually "getting dim" I think they usually just "go out". I think the SMPS might actually be bad, which I'm sure is built into the ...


2

Short answer: No There may be a way to redesign the circuitry but you are better off, in almost every case, to find replacement lights equivelant to what you are replacing.


2

The picture of your range hood indicates that it was designed to vent back into the kitchen area if desired. That is what those small louvered vents on the front are for. Most such units can be either vented through ducting in the traditional method (preferred method, IMHO) or vented through the vents on the front of the unit. They are called convertible ...


2

The old motor had two hot wires in addition to the white (neutral) so that the SPDT switch could select high or low speed. The new motor is one-speed, though you could replace the switch with a variable speed fan control if you want to adjust the speed and noise level. N.B. The link is just for illustration, that particular control might or might not be ...


2

As long as you can maintain adequate cross-sectional area through the entire path it's probably not an issue (assuming few bends downstream). There may be slightly more noise due to turbulence, but it probably won't be noticeable over the sound of the fan itself.


2

The Code requires an overhead exhaust hood to be “at least as wide as the unit and shall extend over the entire unit”. (See ICC M1504) There are exceptions (i.e.: downdraft, etc.) but must be labeled for such use. In addition, it goes on to say the exhaust duct shall extend to the exterior with a backdraft damper and cannot be plastic. Interesting side note: ...


2

Get an assistant watch the vent and blow air in to the duct with a leaf-blower. If it's connected the breeze should be obvious.


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