15

Conventional residential circuit breakers are safety devices that are not subject to adjustment. They are sized based on what the wires to the outlets can safely handle. As you surmised, if you want to draw more power to that area, you need more wiring.


5

Nail in clips just will not hold in drywall. Even over studs, the nails are typically too short to get good penetration. Nail clips and stapes can still work (barely) in drywall if they are used up high where they will not be touched. I would instead recommend and adhesive clip option. The Command Clips linked also have the advantage of coming off the ...


5

Yes there are guidelines for how to place the speakers. E.g. here is a Dolby 5.1 placement guide. But the short answer is A, B, C, F, and E in your diagram, if you have to pick from those exact spots. Also note that some higher-end stereos have a calibration feature that will use a microphone and test tones to detect the placement of each individual speaker,...


5

I have the same receiver and hit this problem when initially setting it up as well. Essentially, the receiver outputs the video signal in the same format as the input, so: for HDMI inputs use the HDMI output, for component inputs use the monitor out (component) jacks, and for composite inputs use the monitor out (video) jack. For your scenario, you'll ...


5

I'm assuming your projector isn't terribly heavy, so... 2 1/2" gold construction screws should work fine to hold the board to the joists. I also like to use decking screws because of their strength and color. They both have small enough heads that shouldn't stick out once they are tightened. I think that larger fasteners like lag bolts just aren't ...


5

The "don't put a surge protector on a surge protector" rule is not about the surge protection, it is about overloading circuits and tripping over wires - which really doesn't apply here. I would treat the installed receptacles as "ordinary" and use a surge protector (of known quality) to add more receptacles.


4

If you're not renting (ie, you own your room or whoever you're living with doesn't mind if you make modifications to the structure), consider the following: Type X drywall: While mainly designed for fire rating, it's very heavy, very dense, and helps in blocking sound. QuietRock: Designed for soundproofing, but very expensive. Consists of a viscoelastic ...


4

This is inconvenient as we use room heaters at night in the bedrooms we use to save on electric bill. Electric resistive heat is the most expensive way to heat a home. If your central heating method is electric resistive heat then using unit heaters will not save you anything. KWh's are the same whether they come from the central heat or the unit heaters. ...


4

Googling "acoustically transparent fabric" returns a variety of companies that provide materials that advertise the characteristics you require. For example: https://fabricmate.com/fabric/acoustic-fabrics/ or https://www.audimute.com/what-is-acoustic-fabric Transparent cloth is available but putting a picture on it is another challenge. The printing ...


4

Yes, flip the meter to "AC". You should detect a fluctuating AC voltage when sound plays. Some amplifiers also put a DC bias on speaker circuits, you can check for that too by flipping the meter to "DC".


4

This problem is most easily addressed by surface mount wireway. Rather than run exposed cables, you attach a fairly innocuous plastic or metal rectangular cross section wireway/duct/conduit that carries the cables across the ceiling and/or wall in a less obtrusive way than putting them out in the open, but which does not require major surgery to the building ...


4

On some speakers the grill part, not the bezel or frame of the grill assembly, but the actual grill with the small holes in it is pressed into the bezel/frame. You take a tool with a point small enough to fit in the holes, or even a very small screwdriver, and you gently pry the grill up and out of the bezel/frame. You want to try and get a hold of the side ...


3

Unless you get metal lined material or mirrored glass doors the radio won't have an issue. And to be honest even if you did it would probably still work fine by going through the wood or whatever the sides of the shelves are made of unless they are solid metal. Any solid fabric is going to block the IR. You could potentially go with a fairly lose weave ...


3

Because you only hook up what you have to, to avoid signal loss. If you're serious about getting HD to all your jacks, you should probably look into getting a powered splitter. Otherwise, you just want a small passive splitter in a good MHz range. Over 2k was bare minimum last time I checked. I have internet cable and I want it as clean as possible, so I ...


3

Save your money and buy the cheap cables. They're the same. The "premium cable" game is nothing more than a big scam.


3

Is there a tiny bit of space between the bracket and the tv? If so I'd use a hacksaw to cut through the screw and remove the bracket. If space is really tight, try removing the blade and using it with your hands. After that, you'll have to see what you are working with. If you are lucky, maybe you can get some epoxy or glue around the bolt inside of the ...


3

Something is sensitive to fluctuations in voltage. My first guess would be the receiver. Instead of buying a new projector or receiver, buy a power conditioner. This will ensure that your cable box, receiver and projector all receive a constant voltage.


3

Visible-light blocking IR-passing "black" plastic (plexiglas, etc) is very common, found in almost all IR receivers. Finding a sheet of it might be a bit more work (and let's not make this a shopping question, which would be off-topic - go hunting for yourself), but hardly impossible. Infrared transmitting (IRT) plastic seems to be one good search term. ...


3

If you can't increase the wattage available in the rooms (which requires running more circuits as others explain), apply the heat more tactically. Heated blankets or mattress pads can provide more comfort for less wattage than room heaters.


3

OTA DTV antenna cable is commonly RG6 (replaced RG59). This is a 75 ohm coaxial cable with an F or BNC termination (probably F). The better quality component video cables use 3 separate RG6 cables with RCA connectors at the end. They are simply attached together in a bundle. My original answer assumed this is what you had. With the picture you've added it ...


3

I would just install 14 gauge wire, it will be more than adequate at 30 feet. Look for a reputable brand that's made for audio and rated CL2 for in-wall installation. Any decent speaker wire will be made with fine strands and sufficient purity for your surround system. You can spend a lot more on speaker wire, but you won't hear any difference.


3

I tried that exact same thing back in my younger years and found out that the signals definitely back fed into each other and weakened the signal going to the subwoofer. Whether or not it would have burned out the equipment, I don't know because I immediately went back to the A/B switches I originally had used. The setups today are not made as well as the ...


3

Running speaker wires is not hard. Because they are low voltage, they are not subject to the same safey-based constraints as regular AC "mains" wiring. You can run them externally along baseboards, around corners, etc. without having to protect with conduit, etc. The only thing you can't do is to run them through the same conduit, junction boxes, ...


3

You already mentioned it in your question, it's an IR (infrared) "extension" or "repeater". There are dozens of models available, find one that does what you need (extends for 100 feet or meters). Wired and wireless models are available. These absorb infrared signals from your remote and retransmit them at the other end, so you'd put one ...


2

Cast Iron is cheap to make in a mold, often bolted together if made in sections and if so, may leak air at the seams, has reasonable fire resistance, can eventually crack from thermal cycling. Often made to look "retro". Steel is easy to make air-tight, requires metal brakes to fold the steel plate into shape, and the seams need to be welded. The firebox ...


2

This seems to be a design and/or shopping question, that is completely dependent on personal preference. You could trim the hole out with wood, some type of metal or plastic flange, some type of port hole from a ship (if you're going for a nautical theme), etc. The options are only limited by your imagination.


2

The current induced in the speaker wire will not be noticed. If it were an input cable it would be different. Speakers wires are after the amplifier so the interference will not get amplified. The only issue is being sure the insulation on the speaker wire is rated for the higher voltage in the AC line.


2

Well, the way I'd find it would be to get a wire tracer. These consist of a transmitter that hooks to one end of the wire to use it as an antenna, and a short-range (and sometimes directional) receiver which you can then use to find the wire emitting that signal. That will let you trace a wire through the wall's surface. (There are several variants of this, ...


2

The routine I found works best when a customer insisted that I use this particular wire clip, is to replace the nail with one of the same gauge, but a longer length. I only replaced the clips that fell on a stud. I also found if I sunk the nail partly so the clip could be swiveled and then re-positioned over the wire, I didn't fumble the clip. Also, if you ...


2

Lehmann is 100% correct, that means your receiver does not have a converter/upscaler inside so you will only be able to view the dvd player on the component OUT, it cannot upscale to a digital format.


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