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15

Conventional residential circuit breakers are safety devices that are not subject to adjustment. They are sized based on what the wires to the outlets can safely handle. As you surmised, if you want to draw more power to that area, you need more wiring.


9

If your heart is not set on a silver screen, I had good results using blackout cloth - this is white, rubber-impregnated cloth that is used for curtains. I got a swath that was 48 inches wide - 1.21 meters, so a bit smaller than what you're looking for, but the largest they had available at the fabric shop. By using a single swath, I avoided seams in the ...


7

If your current AC is not adequate to extend to the garage area, then a ductless mini-split wall mounted AC unit is probably ideal for your situation. Once installed, you'll likely exceed the $1500 budget, but I think it's the best of the options. You wall mount half of the unit inside the home and run the cooling lines through the wall and out to an ...


6

You'll need to pick up a PowerBridge type device, they allow you to have an inlet in one location and an outlet in another. You'll connect the inlet to the outlet using cable rated for the appropriate load (14/2 Romex most likely), this insures everything is up to code (since it's not proper to run extension cords through walls). To make the outlet ...


6

You really want to keep these separate in a high quality audio setup, as you will get interference...especially through a sub. I would even recommend routing the cables in entirely different directions if at all possible to minimise mains hum. Is there no other route for them? As an example, my mains wiring is in the walls, so where possible I have my audio ...


5

You're not showing all the pieces. What we see is a curtain rod and the center support. There are brackets for the end that the rod hooks over. Pictured is a dual curtain rod hanger bracket. The hole in the rod catches on the tang and it drops down onto the bracket. The answer to your problem might be shown in the picture, use a nice board that spans ...


5

I have the same receiver and hit this problem when initially setting it up as well. Essentially, the receiver outputs the video signal in the same format as the input, so: for HDMI inputs use the HDMI output, for component inputs use the monitor out (component) jacks, and for composite inputs use the monitor out (video) jack. For your scenario, you'll ...


5

Yes there are guidelines for how to place the speakers. E.g. here is a Dolby 5.1 placement guide. But the short answer is A, B, C, F, and E in your diagram, if you have to pick from those exact spots. Also note that some higher-end stereos have a calibration feature that will use a microphone and test tones to detect the placement of each individual speaker,...


5

I'm assuming your projector isn't terribly heavy, so... 2 1/2" gold construction screws should work fine to hold the board to the joists. I also like to use decking screws because of their strength and color. They both have small enough heads that shouldn't stick out once they are tightened. I think that larger fasteners like lag bolts just aren't ...


4

HDMI and speaker wire are basically signal wires, not power wires. Both the voltage and amperage is very low. Indoors it is safe to run these hidden or exposed without channel or conduit if they are properly rated. See this Q&A for a discussion of proper rating. When channel or conduit is used, it is either for convenience in handling, and to keep the ...


4

If you're not renting (ie, you own your room or whoever you're living with doesn't mind if you make modifications to the structure), consider the following: Type X drywall: While mainly designed for fire rating, it's very heavy, very dense, and helps in blocking sound. QuietRock: Designed for soundproofing, but very expensive. Consists of a viscoelastic ...


4

You can buy projector screen paint, and just paint your screen on the wall. I don't have personal experience with it, but here's one example -- $179 for 1 gallon which looks to be more than enough for your screen. I'd also recommend trying your projector on a white wall before doing anything -- you may find it to be acceptable without investing in any kind ...


4

Depending on the structure, the header of the door may be load bearing and you'll be met with a solid block of wood behind the drywall that shouldn't be cut. Drill a small test hole from the inside of the closet first. Otherwise, installing a return grill on each side of the wall is fairly simple. Leave at least an inch or two border to the edge of the ...


4

Nail in clips just will not hold in drywall. Even over studs, the nails are typically too short to get good penetration. Nail clips and stapes can still work (barely) in drywall if they are used up high where they will not be touched. I would instead recommend and adhesive clip option. The Command Clips linked also have the advantage of coming off the ...


4

This is inconvenient as we use room heaters at night in the bedrooms we use to save on electric bill. Electric resistive heat is the most expensive way to heat a home. If your central heating method is electric resistive heat then using unit heaters will not save you anything. KWh's are the same whether they come from the central heat or the unit heaters. ...


4

Googling "acoustically transparent fabric" returns a variety of companies that provide materials that advertise the characteristics you require. For example: https://fabricmate.com/fabric/acoustic-fabrics/ or https://www.audimute.com/what-is-acoustic-fabric Transparent cloth is available but putting a picture on it is another challenge. The printing ...


3

According to NEC 300.3(C)(1), you can only run the speaker cable in the same enclosure as a higher-voltage circuit as the insulation of speaker cable is rated for the voltage of the higher-voltage circuit. NEC 2008 300.3(C) Conductors of Different Systems (1) 600 Volts, Nominal, or Less. Conductors of ac and dc circuits, rated 600 volts, nominal, or ...


3

Something is sensitive to fluctuations in voltage. My first guess would be the receiver. Instead of buying a new projector or receiver, buy a power conditioner. This will ensure that your cable box, receiver and projector all receive a constant voltage.


3

I just setup a 5.1 system and obsessed a LOT about this. The room has 8 foot ceilings but has 4 foot knee walls on two sides (with a 45 degree run of sheet rock up to the ceiling). Placement in the corners was the "proper" location for speaker separation as well as aesthetics (and to keep kids from bumping into them). However, I was worried if I put the ...


3

Although all those things are good, and in fact I always do the first three on your list, the important thing is not actually installing them, but ensuring you run cable ducts. If you have ducting, then you future proof the apartment - need another cable? just run it through. So plan as follows: Decide where you will need Ethernet, power and audio wall ...


3

Save your money and buy the cheap cables. They're the same. The "premium cable" game is nothing more than a big scam.


3

Is there a tiny bit of space between the bracket and the tv? If so I'd use a hacksaw to cut through the screw and remove the bracket. If space is really tight, try removing the blade and using it with your hands. After that, you'll have to see what you are working with. If you are lucky, maybe you can get some epoxy or glue around the bolt inside of the ...


3

Because you only hook up what you have to, to avoid signal loss. If you're serious about getting HD to all your jacks, you should probably look into getting a powered splitter. Otherwise, you just want a small passive splitter in a good MHz range. Over 2k was bare minimum last time I checked. I have internet cable and I want it as clean as possible, so I ...


3

Unless you get metal lined material or mirrored glass doors the radio won't have an issue. And to be honest even if you did it would probably still work fine by going through the wood or whatever the sides of the shelves are made of unless they are solid metal. Any solid fabric is going to block the IR. You could potentially go with a fairly lose weave ...


3

If you can't increase the wattage available in the rooms (which requires running more circuits as others explain), apply the heat more tactically. Heated blankets or mattress pads can provide more comfort for less wattage than room heaters.


3

OTA DTV antenna cable is commonly RG6 (replaced RG59). This is a 75 ohm coaxial cable with an F or BNC termination (probably F). The better quality component video cables use 3 separate RG6 cables with RCA connectors at the end. They are simply attached together in a bundle. My original answer assumed this is what you had. With the picture you've added it ...


3

I would just install 14 gauge wire, it will be more than adequate at 30 feet. Look for a reputable brand that's made for audio and rated CL2 for in-wall installation. Any decent speaker wire will be made with fine strands and sufficient purity for your surround system. You can spend a lot more on speaker wire, but you won't hear any difference.


3

Yes, flip the meter to "AC". You should detect a fluctuating AC voltage when sound plays. Some amplifiers also put a DC bias on speaker circuits, you can check for that too by flipping the meter to "DC".


2

What you are looking for is "lazy susan hardware" This will give you the spinning base you need to put your rotating shelves on. I know Ace sells it, probably HD and Lowes do too. A google search found a few examples of motorized lazy susan hardware - and some how to videos.


2

It depends on how much work you want to do. Roxul makes a product called "safe and sound" that is a sound deadener and placed in the wall cavities behind the drywall.


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