56

Not the answer you are looking for, but: Loud Alarms are What You Really NEED Assuming that the premise is a sound one, that people need to be warned of unexpected/unauthorized entrance to the pool area, a loud alarm is the right answer, not an electronic notification. A few examples: It is all too easy to ignore texts/notifications/etc. "If my boss/...


47

Ask your insurer and defense lawyer Lawyering on whether this rule is really a mandate is probably a waste of time. It's a "best practice" and one easily implemented. Which will create civil and criminal liability for you if you don't implement it. "I'm willing to lump the risk", does your insurance company also agree to lump the risk? I bet they don'...


20

Based on your link, I'm assuming you live in Florida. The relevant statutes are 515.29 Residential swimming pool barrier requirements and 515.27 Residential swimming pool safety feature options; penalties. 515.27 list a few options to secure a pool: "In order to pass final inspection and receive a certificate of completion, a residential swimming pool ...


19

It looks a lot like a GoControl W015Z-1 Z-wave smart receptacle. See here


8

Short answer, you definitely want the patch panel, especially if you ran shielded cable. (If you did not run shielded cable, you probably don't want a shielded patch panel.) Male terminations are less reliable than punchdown connections. They tend to create marginal / intermittent failures in many cases, which can be particularly hard to track down. To ...


7

Couple of benefits of patch panels. They make the install neater. You could have the entire bundle of cables going to each room just terminated and hanging lose until it is needed. Or you can terminate them into a panel where they are tucked away. Also labeling the bundle of cables is problematic. Labels fall off and then you spend 10 minutes trying to ...


7

The official statement is that if you have no calor BT app that is currently paired, you are lost and should return the device to the dealer as broken. However, there is a way out - the following steps are written for a Linux environment but probably can be adapted to other OSes: Install a current (!) VirtualBox and VirtualBox Extension Pack for USB ...


6

How about a light switch with a motion sensor? They make ones that are occupancy detectors (detecting motion and then turning on), and vacancy sensors (detecting absence of motion and then turning off). They'll also have a button which can manually toggle the light on or off, and you can set the sensitivity and how long an absence is required before the ...


6

A simplification of @spicetraders answer: Pump up switch You can do this with a "pump up float switch", which operates at line voltage and thus avoids the need for a relay, separate power supply, etc. These cost tens of dollars. These often have a plug on the end so they can control a plug-in pump directly (be sure to get one with the appropriate plug ...


6

Can't speak as much to the TV part, though an awful lot of TVs now work with internet connections. But as far as the internet connection, my recommendation is to wire up CAT 5e (or better) everywhere. Each cable should have one end in the desired location and the other end on a patch panel like: Then you use cheap patch cables to connect to your switch or ...


5

This heavily depends on your HA supervisor, for example with OpenHAB this can be done with the NetworkHealth binding : https://github.com/openhab/openhab/wiki/Network-Health-Binding. The key here is to know your devices IP Address and monitor it. Item in Openhab format: Switch Phone_WIFI "Phone 1" (Status, Network) { nh="192.168.1.101" } Switch ...


5

As per Z-Wave specification, no. A Z-Wave node (device) can only be paired to one hub (the designated 'primary' controller). 'Secondary' controllers added to the primary controller will lose their z-wave netword/added nodes and just act as a relay remote control. I don't believe adding the Wink Hub as a secondary controller is the option you're looking for ...


5

The wooden framed double hung sash design dates from a time when no elderly person was ever left alone long enough to open or close a window. Families were large and any oldster who wanted a window operated would simply whack the nearest youngster with a cane and croak out the appropriate orders. Today the demographic age curve is quite different and there ...


5

These are really old HAI switches (from before Leviton bought them) which use the ALC protocol over separate signaling wires. I finally found someone who could tell me that the original switches were put in around 2005, so I used The Wayback Machine to look at HAI's website as it appeared at that time. From there, I found pictures that match these switches ...


5

No, they don't generally have such an outlet. Perhaps you are looking for an Automatic Washing Machine Shutoff Valve? These devices sense when the washing machine is using electricity and open the water supply valves. Once the machine stops using electricity (i.e., the cycle is done) then the valves shut. Many models also include additional features such as ...


4

Modern fridges only use $70 a year. So 2 hours a day, that a fridge is not opened, is less than penny a day.


4

I never implemented something like this but I did implement something similar with other uses. I also asked a question here for automating parts of the home based on user that entered. It can be implemented using OpenHab with the NetworkHealth binding : https://github.com/openhab/openhab/wiki/Network-Health-Binding. There is no need to issue different ...


4

My own opinion on the pros and cons of a patch panel: Pros: Cleaner look Easier to locate a specific room's connection Easier to deal with non-connected rooms (think of a 5 port switch in a 10 room home with only needing to connect 3 of those rooms) Cons: Extra piece of equipment to install and clutter a tight networking space Extra possible failure ...


4

Personally, I find little use or benefit to a patch panel in a home install. If using the correct connectors (ones rated for solid wires, or more typically for both solid and stranded wires, rather than the ones rated only for stranded wires) plug connections are quick and easy, and there's two fewer places to fail (the patch panel jack and the patch panel ...


4

Yes, you have a couple different options in today's market. The cheapest would be a plug in timer that has to be manually set. As long as your schedule stays consistent, then this is a good option as it's well rounded and very useful. They make both ones with the push dials (as shown below) and ones with electronic displays, both are still relatively cheap. ...


4

Your current plan is no good -- first off, 400.8 point 1 forbids the use of cords as a replacement for permanent wiring (stuffing a cord down a conduit certainly counts, and is also prohibited explicitly by 400.8 point 6). Second, 400.9 prohibits the splicing of cord during installation. Third, wire splices need to be in a junction box so that they can be ...


4

Keeping it simple. Get a water tank float switch which is available at many hardware, farm, or marine supply stores hook it up operate your pump motor. Add a relay with appropriate contact value rated for the pump motors voltage and current. A battery or low voltage transformer would provide power for the driving the relay on and off with float switch's ...


4

You will need to protect against short cycling the air conditioner When you turn an air conditioner compressor off, the pressure in the system does not equalize instantly -- instead, it takes a few minutes for the pressure built up on the high side of the refrigerant circuit to equalize with the pressure on the low side. If you turn the compressor back on ...


4

I doubt you'll get any latitude on the code as written. The code is written very clearly. It isn't within the code enforcement official's discretion to set it aside upon request. If there is ever any accident that may have been prevented by alarms per the code, they'd be responsible ethically and legally. I personally think relying on app notifications ...


4

The NEC requirement is that it be possible to turn on a light in a room, via a switch that is in a reasonably expected location. If you need your phone to turn the light on, that's a no go. NEC is not particular about whether the lamp is a permanently installed light, or a plug-in floor lamp. The floor lamp is allowed to have a switch on itself, which ...


4

First we must determine whether your motion sensors are wired or wireless. Wired The wired PIR motion sensors used in security systems since roughly forever are pretty simple devices. You feed them 12 volts dc to power the electronics; they contain a relay which opens or closes to indicate motion. Some will have a SPDT relay so that the installer can ...


4

You could combine a standard Occupancy Sensor: with a Relay: The Occ Sensor controls the relay, and you use the relay's Normally-Closed terminal to power your Outlet, something like this: So when the Occ Sensor is off, your outlet is on. You would probably need a 2-gang box to be able to fit the sensor, the relay and all the connections (the relay is ...


4

The realities of "low voltage wiring" (also known as Data, Telephone, Alarm and/or Cable TV wiring, and tending to include fiber optics more these days) are that you can have anything from a hole in the wall with a bunch of cables coming out of it that you plug your equipment into, on up to fancified "look what I spent my money on" status ...


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