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Get yourself a bit of aluminum coil stock. Find a color that you can live with, or also pick up some spray paint in flat. Cut a rectangular piece that's as wide as the damage plus 2", and as long as height of the siding face plus 2". Using a scrap board with fairly sharp corners, bend the sheet so that it fits the profile of the siding. You want it ...


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Usually something like this: Enlarge the hole to something like 4 x 6 inches. Cut a scrap of drywall about 5.5 x 8. Drill a couple of holes in the center of the patch. Tie a loop of cord through the pair of holes. Leave enough slack to get a good grip. Maneuver the patch through the hole, rotate it to cover the hole, then secure with dry wall screws ...


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Get a piece of wood large enough to cover the hole, attach that to the wall, then attach the thermostat to the wood. Since the edges will be visible, use solid wood, not plywood. 1/2" thick should be plenty strong. Quick, easy, cheap, and you won't have to deal with patching the drywall.


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My cheap solution for small patchups, is to use a 6 or 7 inch piece of a paint stirrer stick. Smear it with wood glue or construction adhesive and center it on your hole, inside the drywall, aimed where you might want to drive your screws. A screw in the middle can be a handle. You'll have to keep it place while it dries. If you don't care about more holes,...


3

That's a proprietary crossover line that would've come with your faucet. Exact parts may not be easy to find. However, you could probably fix that with a two-way nipple and some standard hose clamps. You'd just cut the line at the leak point, insert the nipple into each stub, and clamp it snug.


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Yeah, newbies + metal drilling is usually a recipe for disaster. Usually I'm a fan of having newbies use hand tools for a good while until they get the tactile feel of the tool and the material. That's hard to do in drills, though, as proper, usable hand drills are practically unobtanium these days. So I'd prefer newbs start with a drill press where ...


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If you are speaking of the holes marked 4,5,6,8,10, these are small bolt sizes. There is 1 size missing and that is #12. Most sizes with diameters less than 3/16" are listed as number sizes. I hope this helps and is what you are asking about.


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A #10 screw will be a close fit in the 10 hole and is approximately 3/16" in diameter. The tolerance on a #10 screw ranges from about 0.182" to 0.190". Gauges of this kind are not intended to make precise measurements, but to easily identify fasteners.


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If you these are due to Carpenter Bees, and I think they are, there are bee larvae inside the hole that you should deal with before sealing it. Otherwise they will hatch and drill their way out. You can buy a insecticidal dust or a foaming "spray" that will travel around the corners and get to the larvae. You can find treatments from online DIY ...


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Here are two that come to mind: Drill the tunnel out to a larger, perfectly round shape. Glue a piece of wood dowel into the hole as a plug. It's not necessary to completely fill the hollowed space -- it would be good enough to make the plug as little as 1/4 inch thick. Obtain or create some sawdust with a color similar to this wood. Mix it with epoxy, ...


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A basic drill/driver will meet the needs you mentioned. What is drill/driver? I think a cordless one would be more convenient. I own the Dewalt 20volt max but you could get away with 12volt max if you are not going to be doing heavy drilling. Dewalt's and their batteries are not cheap, I have set of craftsman cordless tools in another location and they are ...


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They are finished, buy new bits. It would be very unusual for a home craftsman to properly sharpen a bit. I suggest buying three bits of graduated sizes, drilling small ,medium , and final size holes. That little straight section in the center of the bit point is called the chisel, it does not cut but pushes metal aside. So by using a small drill first( with ...


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The pics aren't clear enough for me to comment on the specific bits, but a couple of general hints: start with a small hole and increase drill bit size until you get to your desired size. It's particularly hard for a large-ish bit to make the central dent that gets the rest of the bit cutting slow is better than fast, as you have less risk of overheating ...


2

Ultimately, I used two different types of cement for these two issues. For the narrow gap, I used Quikrete Mortar Repair No. 8620-09, since it is advertised as a tuck-point compound. This is a light acrylic foam that hardens into a mortar-like substance. The applicator was able to inject the compound into the crack pretty easily. For the larger hole in the ...


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From the pest control guy when there was a mouse problem: Bunch/roll up coarse steel wool (thicker strands than a Brillo metal scrubbing pad) and stuff it in the hole tightly. Mice can fit in holes the diameter of a US dime, and through cracks down to 1/4"


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I happened upon this as I was shopping for a new rotary hammer bit. A couple of the posts here are correct. If you intend to construct a wall, the foundation component that will bear the load of such a wall will have to be designed to be up to the task. Furthermore, if you're tying into another concrete component -- like a footing or a reinforced concrete ...


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I would suggest that you properly repair the plasterboard. There are plenty of questions here and advice on the interwebz in general about how to do so. Then, since your repair will likely lead you to finding the studs behind the plasterboard, I'd recommend that when you rehang the curtain rod, you bypass the rawl plugs/mollys/toggle bolts entirely by ...


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Go buy toggle bolts and fender washers (I have seen them up to 2"in diameter) or some other large washer to cover the holes. You could also make a wooden washer out of some pre-finished wood or look for some kind of hanger hardware that will cover the holes and reinstall the curtain hanger. Take the bolt off the toggle, insert it through the curtain rod ...


2

Remove (bust out) the glass block, install permanent support underneath (plywood patch supported either by blocking between joists, or fastened directly to the underside of the slab with concrete screws), notch the edges 1.5" wide by 1.5" deep, pour a cement mix patch with standard aggregate, make sure you get out air bubbles as you go (no voids), ...


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Consider that the old nail holes have saved you the step of drilling pilot holes. If you are installing hardwood trim with a hammer and nail set it is easy to split the piece -- especially on seasoned wood. Since there are already nail holes in the trim, the chances of splitting the wood is very low. Here are some other suggestions: If the opening is too ...


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Just two quick things. Given that your nail heads were covered, I would have just bent them back and broke them off. But if they came out and you have holes on the other side that's fine. Honestly every trim/nail-type might have a best method so there isn't anything that someone can categorically say. To go into existing holes... Get a better quality ...


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According to this page, masonry bits + carbide hole saws are the way to go. If you think (and you may be right) that a carbide hole saw will be ruined by a few holes through HardiePlank, then just get one of the right size rather than a set - because if you get a set then Murphy's law says the next 3 times you need hole saws they will all be that same size ...


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Most home stores have patch kits that would work for you. However, if you have some extra pieces of drywall around you can make your own patch. I fnd it easiest to square off the hole with a utility knife or keyhole saw. Then cut a piece of drywall to fit inside the cutout - it doesn't have to be perfect. Then take a narrow piece of wood like a paint stirrer ...


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Orders are actually easier than flat surfaces. In hour case I would see is i could slip some “paint stir sticks’ behind the sheetrock for support and hold them in place with 2 or 3 Sheetrock screws. For cases like this I use mesh like on the right for the back and let that dry with a coat of mud on it of corse. Then 2 or 3 more coats letting each one dry ...


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I would drill slightly deep and then pour in clear epoxy. Instant polish and level surface.


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So, how rough is the bottom of the hole? Was the hole drilled in steps from small to large or was it a knocked out core. Some ideas could be rotating wood dowel of a suitable diameter with sand to smooth out the surface. How smooth does it need to be - as long as the tea light sits reasonably square then it should be suitable. There are low speed grinders ...


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While your local building codes may vary somewhat, please refer to this IBC document section on "Notching and Boring" of load bearing members: Notching and Boring Standards According to section R502.8.1, you can bore a hole up to 1/3 the width of the member as long as it is not closer than 2" to either edge of the member. Also note that you ...


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Option one - toss enough mortar or hydrualic cement in the hole to fill up the core. Tedious, and annoying, but it works. However, option 2 also works and takes a lot less material. Cut 4 strips of wire mesh or stiff screen about as wide as the widest part of the hole but longer than the hole. Tie long wires to the middle of these in pairs, arranged so that ...


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You can add new drywall to the existing wall. I've been involved with this a few times where people just re-drywalled the whole place. They didn't remove the old drywall, they just doubled up. It improved the sound barrier between rooms and gave them new walls to work with. I was there to bring out the switches, outlets and light fixtures with box extenders.


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If i understand your question you just want to know if many patched holes compromise the structural integrity of the wall. No the structure would not be compromised by many holes. The wall itself may not have the integrity to hold photos or things hung on it but the wall is not going to fall over. It is theoretically possible that if there were many holes ...


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