Hot answers tagged

34

That's plaster, not drywall, and you've encountered metal lath. It was commonly used at corners and other vulnerable locations to add strength and crack resistance. It won't be a problem to cut a small amount away for your purposes. Just be careful to not snag it with a power tool and rip things loose. An abrasive grinding wheel might be a good bet.


30

Hire a core driller. Trust me and do it. You will regret doing this yourself and the cost will seem like nothing in comparison to your struggles with drilling a hole that size in solid concrete. probably cost you 200 bucks. You can rent one from a tool rental company, or even from home depot.... https://www.homedepot.com/tool-truck-rental/Small-Core-...


22

I would procure a sheet of aluminum or steel (available at home improvement and hardware stores), fold a suitable hem at the bottom, and slide it up behind both courses of siding (above and below the holes). Friction will probably keep it in place for the short term, but you could dab some silicone behind to lock it in. | |<-- upper siding course | | ...


20

Of course you can, and it's very easy to do. All you need is an appropriate hole saw. Drill from the top down. If you can, hold or clamp a piece of scrap wood under where you are cutting. That will prevent the bottom from splintering. Then to make it really look nice (and prevent any future splinters) you'll want a desk grommet that slips inside the ...


18

I'm not sure why someone told you that you can't drill all the way though with a Forstner bit, but in my opinion, they are incorrect. These bits excel at creating a flat-bottomed hole but will also drill completely through the material just fine. I regularly use mine in a drill press but they can also be used in a handheld drill. I find that they splinter ...


15

Use a diamond core drill to get a nice clean hole. If you use a hammer drill and carbide drill bit the concrete on the opposite side is going to splay and look like like a beaver was chewing on the wall, not professional at all. You can rent the core drills at most commercial rental places and you will be through the wall in a matter of minutes with a nice ...


13

You might use a half-round rasp or file.


11

The general method I use to make a bigger hole is to take a scrap piece of plywood (1/4" works great) or pegboard or similar that is a bit bigger than the hole, clamp/screw/hold it in place, then use the correct size hole saw to drill through that and into the board. This gives enough of a start to keep the hole saw in place to drill the rest of the way ...


10

Ideally, hole saws have holes or slots in their sides, so you can pry out the scrap, or in the top so you can push it out. (source: mkmorse.com) Poke in there with a screw driver or other sharp object. You shouldn't need to disassemble everything; just unplug the drill. I assume yours don't have this already. If you are going to be doing this a lot, you ...


9

Thank you to everyone for your insight! I made a quick stop at the Lowes down the street and picked up a few inexpensive options you all mentioned. The one that absolutely stood out for my purposes was the drill rasp. As soon as I began I knew it was the one. I went back over 4 holes, each taking about 1-2 minutes to effectively widen and shape. I was very ...


8

If all else fails, you can drive a screw or two into the face of the plug and use those to twist/pull it out. But, yeah, using the side slots to push (alternating from one side to the other) and/or the top holes (ditto) is the official solution. Some pro-quality saws have steps along the side slot, which can be helpful in providing additional leverage ...


8

Borrow a laser level Borrow a 4 foot mason's level Don't use a level -- use a plumb bob and HS geometry Make a plumb bob by hanging a heavy and centered weight from a chalk line and snap it in the center of your desired holes.. Now pick a point on the wall that will be your left hole and two points on your chalked line. Use a wire and measure the ...


8

For a bore hole that large, your best bet is a water-cooled diamond bore. There are many rental centers that can rent you the tool and the bore.


7

Buy a 5" holesaw (and a drill sturdy enough to drive it). Cut a 5" hole in a big chunk of plywood. Screw/nail/clamp the plywood in the place where you want the hole. Drill away. If you're having a hard time with the drill binding and trying to twist your wrist off, run it in reverse. It's much slower, but you won't have the same problem. Couple more tips: ...


6

Use the core drill you mentioned before, make sure it is deep enough, say 4" to get to the bottom of the iron stub. That is the standard mounting depth. To keep the drill in place, drill a hole in a piece of 3/4" plywood big enough (1'X4'??)to lay on the stair you need to drill with the hole in the place that the old post is located. Stand on this while you ...


6

I highly recommend against attempting to repair a tank that handles compressed air at over 100 PSI. Failure could be impressive and catastrophic. None of the liquid repairs designed for fuel tanks or tires are in any way appropriate, and a full reconditioning is not cost-effective. fred_dot_u is correct that the damage was caused by internal moisture. The ...


6

I would use a pice of plastic like from a binder and slip it up under the upper shingle and tape it for a temporary quick fix. I would not use a towel as any moisture that gets on the towel will be wicked inside. If you don’t have a binder or a thin piece of plastic , cover a piece of card board with a trash bag and slip it under the upper shingle. These are ...


6

I did this once. All of the previous answers are valid, but if you're trying to do this through an 8" or thinner concrete wall "on the cheap", don't mind investing a significant chunk of time, and have some DIY skills and access to, or funding for, some modest tools, you can do the following: Get a 1/2" variable-speed hammer drill, a 1/4" carbide-tipped (...


5

You can patch it with hydraulic cement similar to this type You need to carefully remove all loose material and clean the area. The cement is fast setting and expands slightly as it sets, making a tight seal. Only mix as much as you can use in a few minutes.


5

I think your best bet is to use a sanding process to open up the hole. It may take a while but should get you there eventually. When I had a similar problem I took a piece of 1/2 inch diameter birch dowel rod (about nine inches long) and cut a slot across its end. Then inserted a folded over piece of sand paper to make a two sided flap sander. Chucked into ...


5

As for the second question regarding filling the holes after countersinking: Use DAP Painter's Putty '53' - pull out a portion the size of a large marble, shape it into a sphere or ball, and then use it like an eraser on your countersunk nail holes. If you rub the putty ball back and forth along your trim over the countersunk nail hole, you'll slowly fill ...


5

Countersink with a nailset, struck with a hammer. Fill with painters caulk.


5

You can also drill halfway through the board, then turn it around and drill from the other side using the pilot hole to properly align the drill. The scrap piece will end up only halfway in the hole saw, and it's much easier to grab hold of it and remove it.


5

Just put a piece of drywall in and give it a first coat of mud and tape. Seriously this is 10 minutes and no mess. Big box sells little kits for $10 or less for stuff like this. Then when you get around to selling no one will really mind a little patchwork to do in closet.


5

If there is adequate room at the rear of the sink, or if you worry less about centering and just do the sides and the front, a router will do the job nicely. A laminate trimmer may be a better choice on the "fit's the back of the sink" part as they have a smaller base, but they also have more limited bit size/power - still you could do it in a few passes, ...


5

If you have a shorter level than the distance between two hole positions you can find yourself a piece of wood that is say 2 meters long that can be seen to be nice and straight. Hold this length of wood up against the wall in a horizontal position and set your level atop it. The wood can then be repositioned till the level shows a "level" position on its ...


5

Long (18" and longer) drill bits do exist. If the hole is wide enough, bit extensions are also usable. However, there's also a simple-but-elegant cheat. Cut the piece lengthwise, rout a channel in one or both sides, glue back together. If you make a thin-kerf cut, and are careful during reassembly, the glue line can be nearly invisible -- especially on ...


5

The clue here is that the hole leads into an area that is under another part of the upper building structure. It is highly likely that the corresponding part of the building in that area does not have full headroom clearance and thus leaves that area as a "crawl" or "access" space. The hole is what allows you to enter that space if there is need for ...


5

Your choices with regard to this depend greatly upon the materials, construction and finish of the existing door. If it is a solid wood door that will end up with a painted finish then it is possible to clean up the existing hole and make a surface to surface plug of wood that is glued into place before starting the drilling for the new 2 3/4 inch backset. ...


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