42

You could install a circular ceiling medallion over the hole and run the light fixture through the middle of it. This would avoid having to match the paint of the surrounding ceiling. Or here's an even simpler, 10", white trim piece.


25

Get a piece of ply bigger than the hole (at least 2 or 3 times the size and use it to spread the load. If the clamping side is also small then another spreader may be a good idea. There was a similar question like this previously... See Best way to spread load on monitor clamp


16

Like any other repair to sheetrock/plasterboard/drywall. Turn power off (the breaker, not the switch) to the fixture and drop the trim out of your way. Either cut out a larger area and make a large patch, or add some wood strips behind and fit a small patch, then fill the joints (force joint compound into them with a small drywall knife), tape, and mud (...


14

The concrete looks intact enough for re-use, I can't see if the anchor bolts are good or not, if they can't be reused getting old anchors out of concrete can be tricky: you might have to move your letter box one inch to the side so that new anchors can be drilled into virgin concrete. If you do move it don't leave the old anchors protruding they are a trip ...


14

If you wanted to keep the post centered in it's current location, you could rotate the post 45 degrees and re-drill in place. You might not even need to do anything to the old bolts, as it's unlikely to be a tripping hazard so close to the post. You'd probably have to add a plywood mount at the top to rotate the mailbox back to perpendicular to the street, ...


13

If you want to be slightly decorative you could try something like this... Start with an aluminum cake pan, maybe 8" diameter (or larger?) With a removable bottom; example: You only need the bottom. Bend the circular bottom twice with e.g., a vice, or using clamps & a block of wood (*), so that it carefully will slide over the thickness of the ...


9

Should I try to cut out so both the existing and the new drywall will touch half of the metal stud on each side? And put in screws on both sides? Yes that is an effective way to do it. Another way is to add a board, 1"x4" boards work great, as structure to screw to. Clean up your hole so the cuts are straight and at 90 degrees to each other so you ...


6

I know its not a fix as such, but its probably not worth going out your way to fix this issue, The desk in question is very cheap and a new top can be purchased for as a little as £6. https://www.ikea.com/gb/en/p/linnmon-table-top-white-00251135/ Despite being honeycomb particleboard these tops are suprisingly strong so im suprised your mount managed to make ...


5

Another trick, actually a variation of that of @agentp, is to use wire mesh (also called hardware cloth) instead of a wood strip. Choose one with small holes, 1/8" if you can find it, 1/4" is real common in the building stores. It is particularly useful when the thickness of the material is thin (as in the case of interior hollow-core doors 1/8" luan or ...


5

Since you have the original paint and it appears to be good, I would get a roller and work the entire area with a 2nd coat, I would work from the patches out so the roller is not putting as much paint out towards the edges this will help to fade the change in new to old and the second coat should cover the patches to not be noticable, with this said you may ...


5

Well, that's a bit messy looking! The best repair would be to remove the two damaged planks and replace them with new ones. Next best would be to cut back the planks away from the hole and replace the pieces that cross the hole. Next best would be to install flashings that cover the hole. Mold is definitely a possibility. I see moss growing on the insulation....


5

Enlarge your hole to a minimal rectangle with square corners that meets the edge of the desk's frame. Cut a block of wood to match the indicated hole. Glue it to the wood frame (marked in green), and to the (interior) bottom of the desk if it's smooth enough. Run screws as indicated in the picture, so that they pierce through the wood frame and the block. ...


5

One thing that might work well is to get some hard rapid-set mortar (they make them in smaller packages for patch jobs like this). The old bolts can be drilled out of their holes (use a metal-drilling the diameter of the shaft), then you can get a new mailbox and concrete the holes before adding new bolts.


5

Inspect the anchors a little more closely. If they're the drive-in wedge type similar to the RED HEAD brand shown here (photo credit to Grainger), and if the installation hole was drilled clear through the concrete, then you may be able to simply drive them down into the soil below with the help of a hammer and dowel (a piece of rebar, a long bolt, etc). ...


4

Use larger anchors/screws. IMO this is the best option. There are dozens of different types of anchors, so it is possible to find one that will be larger but fit the smaller screw. Myself, I'd drill the rack and use the proper screw for the anchors you have. Another possibility, since brick is pretty deep, is to use a longer Tap-Con style screw, like 3" ...


4

This is a trick for small holes. Cut a strip of wood just wide enough to fit through the hole and length about 2x the size of the hole. ( form the looks a wood paint stirrer may be just the thing ) Tie a string around the center of the strip. Put good glue ( gorilla glue maybe ) on the ends of the strip. Push it all the way through the hole, then pull ...


4

I'd do the packaging tape and call it a day. If the glass is clean it'll hold no problem. If you're really worried, silicone or similar would fill the void between the tape. Then, start looking for your neighborhood vandal.


4

To be honest, I would seriously consider replacing the door. Sometimes the "big" fix turns out to be the cheapest & easiest, particularly if the door is a typical indoor door and a standard size (or close enough that you can get a standard size door and trim it to fit). However, one possibility that might work is a door reinforcer: But (a) it ...


3

I'd get some sleeve bolts and run them all the way through a set of the existing holes. I'd be very surprised if the problem recurs. Use the threaded side on the bracket. Drill completely through the door at the size of the female bolt (around 3/8"). Insert the female bolt from the exterior of the door, and the male from the interior (through the bracket). ...


3

The correct way to repair a damaged PVC pipe is of course to cleanly cut away the damaged portion and use a coupler. But, because this is a drain pipe and thus isn't pressurized, you could probably get away with just using epoxy to repair the holes. Buy a PVC-suitable epoxy that's listed for use with water (e.g., J-B Weld makes a product called Waterweld), ...


3

Acquire a rotatory impact hammer drill so that you can pocket rebar into the existing concrete. Buy 'high-strength' expensive concrete. If you called a truck for onsite mixing (an unnecessary expense), tell the driver, 7 bag mix. An alternative to rebar, for such a small patch, is to use long masonry screws, left standing proud to provide an anchor. E.g., ...


3

Talk to your city to see what they are going to require. The inspector should come out and assess the home and see what work needs to be done. There is a good chance that your inspector may say nothing. I am not sure where on the joist the holes are drilled but really we are talking about something that is completely insignificant 99% of the time. Also ...


3

If you could dimple in the metal around the hole so that you leave enough metal for screw threads to engage then you can install a flat head sheet metal screw that has threads right up to the head. This strategy in the best case would recess the screw head enough so that you could use some high temperature epoxy to fill in over the screw head. In the less ...


3

Expanding foam can get messy but it may be your best bet, if you can keep it in place and they do not chew through it. You may want to either incorporate a heavy gauge metal mesh wire, neatly cut around or into the place the mice go through. You might could even "bed" the wire mesh in the foam as it is expanding to lock in place that way. Doing this will ...


3

Nope. Use proper drywall tape of either the paper or fiberglass varieties. Both are cheap and won't leave you with a gooey, hollow, fragile mess. I also recommend proper joint compound. Spackle is very light and soft and not suitable for filling large depressions. If you're dealing with concrete or regular moisture, consider a setting-type compound for ...


3

Alternatives: Remove screws and fully dry the holes and tiles there. Then back fill the holes with a colored epoxy that color matches close to the tile. Back fill the holes with a tile grout material of color similar to the tile color. Break or cut out the tile with the holes and replace with one of the spare left over tiles from the original installation ...


3

From what I can see in those images, I wouldn't bother repairing that drywall until the new door is in. Sometimes hanging/fitting a door requires a lot of work to get it plumb, straight, and level, and that may cause you to damage what you just repaired. Once the new door is installed, you can see how the wall will need to be repaired relative to the new ...


3

Find a good section of door with the same pattern. Spray release chemical on that section of door. Build a box/frame with a back around this area. Fill the box with expanding foam, so it extrudes against the door area. Release the foam and box from the door. You now have a mold. Paint the mold with just enough epoxy to give it a hard shell (harder than ...


3

Sounds like a pretty standard repointing job, other than the location - rake, chisel (or "grout-saw") out all the loose/deteriorated mortar to some convenient depth, wet the joints, pack in new mortar (keep it damp so that it cures, rather than drying out) and tool the surface. You'll find more information in general on "repointing brick" ...


2

Regarding Mark's comment - exterior doors may be fire rated per the IBC depending on the proximity of the building in question to adjacent properties and the property line. As a fire rated door, NFPA 80 limits the proper repair methodology to using either a steel fastener that completely fills the hole, or by filling the hole with the same material as the ...


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