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Yes it is possible. You would need Face Frame hinges similar to the one shown below. They come in many sizes depending on how much of an overlay your doors will have over the cabinet frame. The drilling instructions differ with the type of hinge you will use so you'd want to figure that out first. Also, I would recommend borrowing, renting a drill press ...


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Epoxy instead of wood glue irrespective of any hole filling method you use. If this is for oak door hinges, I find it hard to understand why you cannot dowel? (The dowels are hidden underneath the hinge plates).


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I've occasionally seen toothpick style repairs and never been highly impressed with them. It kinda works, and it's cheap and easy, but the wood a toothpick is made of is nothing like your oak base material. Even with wood glue to help hold it in place the toothpick wood is still soft. A technique I've recently read about, but haven't yet tried myself, is to ...


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Toothpicks. As I've previously answered here Slightly different question, so not a duplicate. But answer is the same.


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I have used tooth picks and matches with glue for many years. With hard wood I use toothpicks as they are hard, match sticks with the head cut off work will work but I use those on soft wood like pine. I squirt the wood glue in push in however many I think I need then wipe the excess and insert the screws


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Out of the three listed options I would use #3 as it is closest to the dowel method. I would also use longer screws if possible so that if only part of the hole is stripped the extra length can get more grip.


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I would go for the dowel method. Support the door, move that face of the hinge out of the way, drill, and fit dowel with glue. Let dry, pilot drill and then use good screws.


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Based on your last edit just go to your home store and pick up a tap and drill for a larger screw than you have holding the door now. Remove the door and wall plate, drill and tap the holes and replace with new stainless screws.


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It looks to me that the hinge is secured to the wall bracket with screws that enter from the wall side of the bracket. If this is the case it would be necessary to remove the screws that hold the wall bracket to the wall in order to gain access to tighten these screws that come loose. You may want to consider the use of a thread locker product on the ...


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You say "3 times", so you have been able to re-tighten the screws and then they work loose again... I would clean the screws and then tighten them but also add a threadlocking product to stop them coming undone in the future. There are usually several grades of threadlocking products, at least with the ones I used. I would be looking for the Loctite brand ...


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