Hot answers tagged

34

The casing is very thin and its purpose it to keep the bearing's balls in place, protect them from dust and grime and to hold in some lubricant. It doesn't share any load. The hinges are very durable as the friction load is much less than with a regular hinge. They are also quieter. Below are a few diagrams on what might be inside a ball bearing hinge: Hope ...


33

Sorry, but that is nothing more than a stripped out Phillips screw. I'd say drilling it out is your easiest bet.


32

As you are a perfectionist for installing hinge screws perfectly it turns out that there is a product made just for this purpose. It is a self centering pilot drill that aims the pilot drill bit right on center in the hinge hole. There is a spring loaded sleeve around the drill bit that pushes back as the bit bores the hole. The tip of the sleeve centers ...


17

Suggested construction: This spreads the torsional load over the entire banister railing instead of stressing only the cap or top rail. If there's any bending at the hinge, or other distortion, it will be confined to the added pieces and will leave your existing railing unaffected.


16

In addition to the other answer, there are self-centring punches (often explicitly intended for locating hinge screws). You could also use an appropriately sized transfer punch. [image source]


15

The casing is just to stop the balls falling out. It doesn't take any of the vertical load. Inside the case there is a series of ball bearings arranged around the hinge pin. The ball bearings take all the load. When the hinge is turned, the balls rotate. The result is that there is no sliding of metal surfaces over each other, so there is very much ...


14

The best method of reducing the chance of putting more stress on one hinge vs another is to use prehung doors. Your question is the number one reason why most doors that are installed are prehung. The fact is they can have a machine cut the hinge cutouts on the jamb to pretty close perfection (you can look at a prehung door for about 1 second to tell ...


11

If you're referring to vertical loading, you'll never get that perfect. However, with a bit of time they'll equalize due to wear on the hinge leaves. Now if you're talking about lateral loads, you can't do anything about that. The top hinge naturally has more tension on it, barring any misalignment of the other hinges at a give swing angle, and the bottom ...


10

I agree it is a stripped Phillips screw head, and that the head should be drilled off, the hinge removed, and then the remaining screw shaft unscrewed with a pair of pliers. "Sometimes", you can get or grind a blade screwdriver whose tip is exactly as wide as the Phillips cross. Remove all the other screws, insert the blade tip into two of the remaining ...


8

In all my years of hanging doors, prehung and many from scratch, where the hinges were cut in as well as all the other hardware, I have never needed to bend a single hinge. If the sagging is from loose screws, they need tightening or replace with a longer screw for better grab. Sometimes the hinge need a shim placed behind it cut from cardboard and build up ...


7

Short of reframing the door, I'd suggest taking a belt sander to the side of the door that sticks.


7

If you just hung the gate on one set of these it would be a problem. Also if you just used one bolt to hold the strap to the gate it would be a problem. With that said if you build your gate as a rectangular element with proper cross brace so that the gate itself keeps its shape and then mount the straps to the gate with two bolts each you will not see ...


7

They connect the sections together so the entire door moves when opening or closing it. 3 on each side means each except the bottom one is connected to the one below.


7

Shims. Go to the local home center and get some of the (free?) laminate counter top samples in the kitchen cabinet section, they are about 3x5 inches. I then cut them to the same size as the hinge plate. Remove the hinge, place it on the sample and trace around it, it does not need to perfect but it should not be bigger then the hinge. I cut them with tin ...


6

If the hinges are on the same vertical line, then (as noted by @DA01) the hinge should stay wherever you leave it (absent wind, etc). If the hinges aren't vertically aligned, then the gate will want to swing towards a specific point. You can use this to solve your problem. Imagine that the gate is swinging on a rod, and can go 360° around the rod. If ...


6

According to the installation instructions (found here), there is a cover in the center that is removed, then two pins pull out, allowing the box cover to be removed. Once removed, there are 4 bolts in the corners of the box holding the face plate on.


6

If you're open to buying a new toilet seat you can find seats with stiff hinges such as this: EZ Close seat Random example, never used above product... With little kids in the house, I've picked up a few of these type of seat from a local home store. They are marketed as "Slam free", "slow close", "quiet close" and similar. The hinge provides enough ...


6

I would look at seeing if you could use large size slider bolts. I used this type of device to provide the safety latch for a large hinged stairway I had built in my garage some 13 years ago. The stairway was raised and lowered via an electric winch and cable/pulley system but I added two of the slide bolts (one on each side) as a safety measure when the ...


6

You should have 2 or even 3 of these hinges to install on the gate which can be adjusted to correct the slope of a loose fitting pin. However if the pin is way too small I would check to see if the right hinge pin piece was supplied. Remember the top hinge pin is usually installed facing downward so the gate can not be lifted off reducing tour security. All ...


6

I think this is as close as you are going to get, because of the width of your face-frame:


5

sears, has a driver set I have used several times it was 12$ for 3 sizes here is a link hope that is allowed: http://www.craftsman.com/craftsman-3-pc-screw-out-174-damaged-screw/p-00952154000P?sid=IDxCMDFx20140801x001&KPID=00952154000 there have been a few times I had to drill out the head then use vice grips to grab the shaft and unscrew that way where ...


5

I know it as a butler's tray hinge, or drop-leaf hinge.


5

They are called plastic dowels There are different sizes for different brands of hinges. Also note that they take special screws. Search hinge plastic dowels and add the brand of hinge, if you know it. Images and links are for illustration only, not an endorsement of goods or sources.


5

It's overly perfectionist for the hinge screws, but for the strike and strike plate screws, there is no level of perfection that you should not attempt to achieve. Usually doors only have one set of hinges in their lifetime. If I don't need toothpicks for the 5th time I'm changing the lock, then you did it right: pre-drilled with a bit that's not even as ...


5

I could give you some easy tips on adjusting the door and jamb but I would only do that if there wasn't the option to - make the frame bigger (rough opening). You can plane off 1/4" on one of the sides in about 5-10 minutes and you won't be messing with the integrity of the door you bought. You can plane sloppy and with shims you are still good to go.


5

Just one detail: the horizontal force does not need to be tremendous and you can in fact adjust/limit it. The force the clothesline transmits to the post is in direction of the angle the clothesline has directly at the post, α. We can decompose it into a vertical component Fv that adds up (for both posts) to the gravitational force of the combined mass of ...


5

Cut a plug of wood to the height and width of the two mortises. Use pine and cut the depth so the plug stands slightly proud when set in the mortises. You want the mortises to be a single mortise so chisel out any partition. Cut the mortise to fit the plug. With a utility knife define the shape of the plug on the jamb. Cut away any parts that obstruct it's ...


4

Barrel Hinge: But note that there's nothing intrinsically wrong with fitting a completely different type of hinge. You obviously need hinges explicitly intended for outdoor use. Not like these


4

As others have said, it's a stripped Phillips Screw. What's not quite so clear is why it's there. My guess is that someone fitted a brass screw (as opposed to the others which do seem to be steel, at any rate their heads are smaller) in that position, with a power-screwdriver. Then, realising it was proud and stopped the door closing, they tried to remove ...


4

I'd put in a piece of matched wood, then use an appropriate filler to smooth the junction between the patch and the frame. If it's painted, you can get away with other materials.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible