Hot answers tagged

26

Well, you really nailed it. It's the fact that normal everyday garden variety extension cords are usually 16 AWG, or maybe 14 AWG if you're lucky. The reality is, an extension cord, properly sized for the load, would pose no safety issue, other then potentially being damaged from grandma's proverbial rocking chair, but then again, we have AFCI breakers to ...


17

In addition to the already stated "shouldn't use a flimsy little 18 gauge extension cord", which would have a definite overheating problem, two specifics come to mind: Tripping Tripping over an extension cord is a real problem. Tripping over a cord that then moves a hot appliance into a dangerous position (on clothes or curtains etc.) is far ...


9

Lawyers, pure and simple. When you start a fire with an electric heater plugged into an exension cord, even if the extension cord is massively over-adequate and properly protected from damage, you were "violating manufacturer's instructions" and they are off the hook, legally, even if the fire had nothing to do with the extension cord. It's "...


7

Quite simply, it's the law in most states as around 40 states have adopted the international fire code. The International Code Council (ICC) covers space heaters under the International Fire Code, Section 605.10.1-4. The code lists under what occupancies space heaters can be used, it specifies that only listed and labeled portable space heaters can be used, ...


5

A short or arcing would most likely sound more like a buzzing (but could sound like a hiss, I guess) but would also be accompanied by smoke, a nasty "fried circuitry" ozoneish smell, and black soot marks near the source. I have never heard of this being a common source of danger for anything besides fire and/or shock. I think it is way more likely ...


4

In addition to other good answers, often there usually isn't a perfect zero-resistance connection where the plug fits and holds in the socket purely by friction. If one is using an appliance with a high current draw for a period of time, if any part of the connection gets warm/hot/overheated before the wires themselves, typically its where it plugs into the ...


4

The common failure mode I am familiar with is plugging two (or sometimes even more) heating appliances in the extension cord sockets. The problem is, breakers don't react quickly to mild (e.g. 2x or 4x) overloads. This is both a technology limitation of the traditional fuses and an engineered feature of the newer electronic protection devices - in order to ...


4

It appears to me that these are basic solar hot water heaters with a pump to run your pool water through them. You set up the pump in the vicinity of the pool, run some tubing from the pool, through the pump, through the panels, then back to the pool. From the linked instructions: S120U INSTALLATION This layout is for a single collector installed near the ...


4

My natural gas heating unit runs almost silent normally, but it started sounding similar last year when the draft inducer motor was failing. The draft inducer is an exhaust fan that starts up and makes sure it can pull the combustion byproducts out the vent stack before the gas starts up in a heating cycle. I was able to identify it was this motor by pulling ...


3

This is a difficult question to answer because a lot depends on heating a living space well beyond the temperature that one normally heats a room to. Take this not as an answer but as a commentary that I could not fit in the comment box. What matters is how much BTU ("heat output") you need to produce, to raise the temperature in a room. The source ...


3

Absolutely not. The 18/5 thermostat wire is intended for low voltage, either millivolt or 24-volt AC thermostats intended for use with gas furnaces or heat pumps. With line voltage heaters like the Cadet, you normally run full-power house wiring (12/2 or 10/2) from the circuit breaker to the thermostat. And then, more 12/2 or 10/2 from the thermostat to ...


3

One thing that is not explicitly mentioned here is something that used to happen to me when welding at a client site. - we have long extension cables (heavy duty) which easily run the welders. if, when the length is not needed, we leave them wound-up the customer experiences their earth leakage tripping more often, and the cables get much hotter ( to the ...


3

Yes, you can (broad question, broad answer.) The details of "how to do that without causing major structural problems or collapse" are variable and site-specific, having a lot to do with how the cabin is presently supported, and how you prevent compromising that support when digging under it.


3

I really don't understand your proposal but if you're adamant about it then just supplement your hot line with a tankless closer to your fixtures. If you set your tank to 125F and your tankless to 120F then your tankless should only operate for a very short period instead of always warming the incoming cold line. If your tank ever runs out then your tankless ...


3

Ok this is probably a simple issue. You have a double pole circuit but the thermostat is only single pole and you read 120v not 240 as you expected. With baseboard heaters it is common to only break one leg. With one leg open no current can flow so no heat. The heater is required to be grounded so measuring the voltage with the heater turned on providing ...


2

"Too much air" would not trigger overheat switches. Too much heat would. One possible cause is an oversized furnace with not enough registers or not enough return air or both. This could cause overheating as you describe. It's a guess. [EDITED to add 3 additional, less drastic, steps] : There are some things you should try, that I hope you or ...


2

"Ditto", to what the others have said. In order to get hot water at the "point of use", the faucets have to expel the cold water that is in that line. Adding a tankless heater would be a very expensive way to solve that problem. Adding it to the cold water line would not allow you to control the temperature of water coming out of the ...


2

On product description: Key Features and Benefits Top discharge provides powerful convection airflow From User Manual: 5. To prevent a possible fire, do not block the air intakes or exhaust in any manner.


2

1: Clothes are inadequately dried. Sitting in the washer too long can do it. Too much water left in the clothes and inadequate drying can do it. Things grow in the clothes. Clothes were once inadequately dried and now are colonized. Especially for towels - I think they get colonized and then the colonies spring to life. Colonies survive subsequent ...


2

One more important reason: Coiled cable. Because your extension cord is 20 feet and you only need 5, so why not roll the rest into neat circle? Don't. Coiled cable will heat up rapidly with no way to dissipate the energy. Good quality extension cords will have a current rating "when unrolled" and "when coiled" - the second one will be ...


2

That's fine. The two key limits are: No more than 80% of circuit capacity in continuous use. Heaters are assumed to be continuous use, but 3.4A + 6.3A = 9.7A and 80% of 15A is 12A, so you're fine. It may actually be a 20A circuit, which is also fine as long as all the wires are 12 AWG (can't tell from the picture if they are 14 AWG or 12 AWG). No ...


2

I am more than a little concerned about this. A 15,000 W heater @ 240V = 62.5 A continuous. Which means it actually needs 78.125 A rating ==> 80 A breaker. That is a lot of power. But more important than it needing that much power, they should be telling you to use an 80A breaker. The fact that they are not doing so is a huge red flag. In addition, this ...


2

They did not make this clear in the advertising material, but this is an extremely ambitious installation. Very few houses have enough power to run a heater this large. It cost $500 but you'll spend that much installing it, as well as that much a year running it. It will cost about $2.00 an hour to run in most places. The good news is, the heavy wiring and ...


2

I think you're looking at it a bit wrong. It doesn't matter if it burns more or less gas, or stays hotter longer or circulates less. That's not how you reduce your heating costs. You want it to transfer heat as efficiently as possible from the burner to the room you're trying to heat. That means heating the water, having the water hold onto as much heat as ...


1

Search "Cadet FW conversion kit". You should find options for you to install a modern Cadet core into your heater frame.


1

It's pretty much the same logic that always, under any circumstances, forbids you to cross a road on a red light. Obviously, if you understand how the traffic is organized and carefully look for incoming cars before crossing, nothing bad will happen. However, if you get a habit of breaking the rules, there will be a risk. The same will happen with extension ...


1

If your new outlet is just for straight 230(240) Volt and a ground then you'll be OK provided the breaker and wire size will handle the load of whatever you're going to plug into the outlet. Since the white wire is hot, it should be marked with black (usually) electrical tape (in the USA). If your outlet will need a neutral, then this wiring won't work. ...


1

Bacteria and mold are not reported as growing in tankless water heaters. AFIK the absence of an anode has nothing to do with mold growth, and the presence of an anode in a hot water tank does not inhibit mold or bacteria. Off odor might be coming from odor substances in the incoming city water. Alternatively, sometimes clothes washers develop mold, ...


1

Copy an existing design Here's another answer with an approach to doing this the way you want. I'm not advocating this, but I think it solves some of the problems. The design is stolen from a macerating toilet. In the photo you could analogize the small vessel collecting condensate via an air gap to the toilet bowl, and the trap to the toilet's serpentine ...


1

The place where the pump enters the waste line would need to have a trap and a vent just like any other fixture. Seems like a lot of effort for a condensation line. An easier, maybe ugly way to do this would be to pump into the open side of an existing fixture (toilet or sink) in the level above. An even easier approach would be to pump to the outside. ...


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