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22

You want an high-efficiency heat exchanger. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_recovery_ventilation Basically, you pipe in fresh air, but have it cooled before, while you heat out the air that is going out. It's typically installed on central hvac systems. It needs maintenance to be efficient and it is quite often overlooked by contractors as it's hard to ...


20

That's a really high CO₂ level. You need to figure out what is causing it and fix that, it's not normal. Gas fired appliances with leaky vents are the most likely suspects — hot water heater, dryer? (Probably not your furnace, since its summer!) In the meantime I would seriously open some windows and suck it up, that's dangerously high if accurate.


12

Your furnace controller board is very likely indicating a trouble situation and shutting itself down. This is the equivalent of a car turning on its check engine light and not wanting to move. Shutting the main power off clears the error code and allows it to work temporarily but doesn’t fix what’s actually at fault. First, change out your furnace filter. ...


7

I'd have no concerns about doing what you describe. I've seen it done many times here in frigid Minnesota. Build your walls (using treated lumber and suitable nails where it contacts the slab), insulate the walls and ceiling, and line the entire thing with 4 mil poly sheeting. Yes, you'll lose a bit of heat through the floor, but since your heat source is ...


6

The bigger issue is that if there are bedbugs in your apartment, the whole building is probably infested. Your best bet is probably to isolate yourself from the bedbugs and set a CO2 bedbug trap. Look into finding a new apartment.


5

No, that's not at all how it works. This feeder will provide 60A @ 240V. That is 60A on each leg of the panel, NOT 30A on each. The 60A is available, you use what you need up to roughly 60A, again, on each leg. A residential panel will be hard pressed to be fully balanced, or greatly imbalanced, due to the transient nature of usage.


5

Well stoves aren't space heaters. Remember that. If you think your stove heats better, its probably due to your stove having 50 AMPS at 240V available to it. That' 12,000 watts. Any portable cheap electric space heater that you can plug in to mere common outlets will be limited to 1800 watts, but more often 1200 or 1350. It's about the amount of energy ...


4

Residential clothes dryers typically vent at a temperature of around 130°-165°F (54°-74°C). Wikipedia gives the glass transition temperature (colloquially the melting point) of ABS as 221°F (105°C). Even assuming that you get a perfect heat transfer, you'll be fine.


4

Power (heat) is measured in watts. A heater with a higher wattage will put out more heat than a lower wattage heater. In the USA, most portable heaters will be limited to around 1500 watts due to typical 120V/15A home wiring. Permanently installed electric heaters are often higher. Note that a single large electric stove burner could well be more than that: ...


4

Since you have baseboards, you don't have a fan. That means it's probably a 2-wire thermostat. Check the voltages with a voltmeter to make sure you're not playing with 120/230V line voltage. (it's likely either 24V or millivolt). The thermostat you describe is for a 24-volt system. Those simply short wires together. To call for heat, they short R, G ...


4

That's fairly silly. Of all the consumer electric products on earth, heaters are inherently the least expensive. That is to say you can get cheap, good ones. A 1500-watt cheap tossie is $12 and will last a year. A quality oil-filled heater is $40 and will last 10-20 years. A proper, fixed-installation 2000W baseboard heater is $50 and will last 20-30 ...


4

What type of air condition are you using? Some only cool the air inside, while others use fresh air from outside. In a cafe or club there are norms about how much fresh air the air condition must put inside during a given period of time. I would suggest the following: measure the CO₂ concentration outside to compare it with your inside CO₂ concentrations. ...


4

Microwaves work by exciting the molecules in liquids that then trasfer their heat into surrounding materials. To be safe, "microwavable" products have water in them so that the water molecules are what heats up. If you use a product not designed for this, you could end up volatizing (vaporizing) VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) that are not only harmful, ...


3

I'm going to suspect poorly insulated ducts running in unconditioned space as a first guess. I don't know the layout of your system, but it's very common to take duct runs up into the attic, and even if they are wrapped with duct wrap (R3-5 typically) that's abysmal. If the ducts are poorly wrapped or not wrapped in spots, it gets worse. R-50+ is far more ...


3

There should be a nameplate on the unit, which among other things will list the expected temperature rise across the heat exchanger. This value tells you how much the furnace should be expected to raise the temperature of the incoming air. Furnaces do not put out an exact temperature air, the outlet air temperature is always based on the inlet air ...


3

Range hood vented to outdoors. Overlay heat resistant materials over cabinet, CBU/porcelain tile or CBU/stainless steel sheeting CBU = Cement Backer Unit AKA Cement Backer Board


3

Yes, if you close too many dampers, you can overly restrict air flow which will burn out your furnace motor. However, what’s more likely is air flow will increase in the ducts/grills that have not been restricted. When this happens it could create a “whistling” noise because the ducts are too small for the amount of air being pushed down the duct. When we ...


3

Too long for a comment. I agree that closing too many it can cause problems. When installing main trunks in multi story homes I like 60/40 in the main trunks in summer 60% upstairs for cooling and 40% downstairs. In winter 60% down and 40% up. Having these 2 simple marks on 2 dampers makes the seasonal adjustment quick and easy. By adjusting the main trunks ...


3

I grew up in the 1940s and 1950s in hot, humid south Louisiana and hot, less humid Dallas, Texas. We had no a/c in Louisiana and starting in about 1954 in Dallas we had window units in some rooms, but not in the bedroom I shared with my brother. In 1960 we moved to a new house in Dallas, Texas with central a/c. The improvement in comfort was astounding. ...


3

Heaters are cheap. There'd be no reason to do this! An electric heater is one of the simplest appliances in the world -- so it is inherently very low-cost. It's not cheaply made, it's just simple enough it doesn't cost very much to make one. It will be cheaper to buy the right heater than adapt the wrong heater. I imagine you got this thing gifted to ...


3

edited after picture added to question It's tough to get a big shed like that warm when everything's cold. You can heat up the air quickly, but the slab, the walls, the contents all soak up that heat so it takes a while to warm up. That happens even with insulation, although it probably won't be as cold first thing in the morning if it's insulated. I'...


2

I dont think you will be able to effectively heat the room to 140 deg. The main problem is Insulation. Escaped heat: Your room is probably not insulated for the cold (as much as some other climates). so internally heating your room may require a large amount of source heat since much will escape. Insulation from Room Components: items such as beds, wall ...


2

Thermal mass does not block heat; it stores and releases heat, and it slows down the flow of heat. It will absorb heat when it is colder than the surrounding area, and it will release heat when it is warmer than the surrounding area. These characteristics are useful in the following circumstances: A thermal mass wall in a climate/season where the outdoor ...


2

As long as it's oxygen-barrier PEX (red often is) then it should be just fine for baseboard heating. The reddish hue on your ceiling is odd, but I have a hunch it's just light reflecting off of the red pipe. Not putting it inside the walls is being a bit cheap, but, then again, there's some argument for making pipes easily accessible too. If you want to ...


2

My plan worked perfectly and I called Emerson Sensi customer service to check that it will not cause any issues and the confirmed. The 2 wires to the 24VAC relay that control the baseboard get connected to the Rh and W terminals on the thermostat. I cut the jumper between Rh and Rc to ensure I wouldn't cause a short by adding another power source I used an ...


2

What you need is called an Energy Audit. We had one done on our home several years ago. They go through your home looking for areas lacking in energy efficiency. One of the major parts of the audit is called a Blower Door Test. During this test they put a large fan into the door of your home and put your house under a vacuum. The result of this test - how ...


2

Based on the photos you provided I am sure that your heating system is hydronic, i.e. water is heated by the furnace and then flows through your baseboards giving up its heat to the room. The unit on the left in your photo is your water heater which operates independently of your heating furnace (the unit on the right). That's why you can have hot water ...


2

Most thermostats use very little power, if any. Many of the Honeywell programmable thermostats you can buy from retail places, for instance, take 2 AA batteries for their power source and do NOT pull power from the fan unit. If your unit is a WiFi one, that may not be as true. Either way, I'd be surprised to see one consume more than a dollar a month at ...


2

It probably has to do with two things: Perception and mixing. When it's very cold the radiators are on more often. You feel the heat coming off them, which makes it feel warmer in the home even though the average room temperature is about the same. Also, when the radiators run less often in warmer weather, parts of the house (or each room) cool off ...


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