28

There are a lot of factors when it comes to pricing flooring as it has become a highly competitive, mass produced commodity. What you have here is the cheapest specs you can get in wood flooring: 2" wide planks are about as narrow as it gets, it is a harder install 3/8" thickness is about as thin as it gets and will limit its application to something ...


17

It's likely a knot that came loose. The circular grain around it sure makes it look that way. The wood can turn blackish like this if water gets in there and sits which could easily have happened with a small hole like that. How a Pin Knot is formed. Broken branch with encased dead twig, when the branch split under snow load, the twig slid through the ...


12

Solid wood flooring in a wet area is inherently risky due to the moisture everywhere. Pine flooring (a moisture-absorbent softwood) is inherently risky to install. Solid boards are inherently more prone to cupping than engineered boards. Gluing a wood floor to concrete is inherently risky because concrete is a big sponge that absorbs and releases moisture in ...


10

Surface finishes are notoriously difficult to get smooth when the process is interrupted. The glossier the finish, the harder to have sections blend. If you are talking about preliminary coats, especially if they will get a light sanding between coats, this is probably ok. For the finish coat, I would strive hard to do it all in one shot. If you simply ...


10

Your problem is obvious. Moisture is migrating up from the slab. I don't imagine anyone suggested to do a moisture check on the concrete before you started? There are meters that can measure the % of moisture in concrete. With that said, it is never a good idea to put wood or laminate directly on concrete slabs or uncured concrete upper floors. In your ...


8

@iLikeDirt covered a lot of important information, but I'd like to add something since the majority of the information assumes that there is a problem of excess moisture due to the concrete, while the expert assessment says it is actually dry cupping that is the problem. Dry cupping implies that the interior humidity is dropping below the average ...


8

If you have a traditional wood framed house, termites in the flooring would be the least of your problems. Structural issues due to termites in load bearing walls would be much worse. Are you on a slab or crawlspace? If you're on a crawlspace, you already have a wooden subfloor anyway. Do you have a current termite problem, or are they common in your area?...


7

Make a bow drill: Get a block of wood big enough to hold in your hand. Scrape out small hole in the wood. The non-pointy end of the drill bit goes in that hole. This is called the "hand hold". You're going to use this wood block to push the drill bit against the door. Make a bow with some strong wood and strong string. Wrap the string around the drill bit,...


7

Do NOT install expansion spaces between each board. You want a very tight fit between each board and then leave an expansion space around the perimeter of each room. First you’ll need to acclimate the wood to your house. This may vary by location and season, but generally the manufacturers recommend about 10 days. Second, seal the floor (again, according ...


6

Wall to wall carpeting is usually attached to the floor using carpet tack strips around the perimeter like these The raised tack points grip the edges of the carpet. Once you pull up the carpet, there is probably a padding that is just laid on the floor without adhesive. If it is rubber backed, the rubber bottom surface sometimes sticks to the floor ...


6

There is nothing wrong with putting engineered flooring on your slab in Florida. It can last a really long time and I have installed it in my own home on slab and helped with other homes. Buy a really good wood. Make sure that you really give it a scratch test. Get samples and whatever. I used to take pennies, screwdrivers, smack my wife heals, all ...


6

Removing Dark Stains With Sandpaper Remove the finish over the stain gently with sandpaper, moving with the grain of the wood. Use #100-grit sandpaper, and then feather the edges with #150-grit sandpaper. Sand the stain with #150-grit sandpaper, now that you have removed the finish. Feather the edges around the stained area with #0000 steel ...


6

Oxalic acid, either in crystal form or as part of a pressure treated deck cleaner/brightner will chemically dissolve the stain. If you use the crystals, use all normal precautions for acids (eye, hand, clothing). You can sparingly apply with a small nylon artists brush. Try 5 min increments (5 on, wipe off, 10 on, wipe off) until the stain starts to ...


6

For strength, hardwood is far preferable to softwood. Most big box stores have pieces of oak, often in the stair parts section. If nothing else is available, poplar would be preferable to softwood such as pine, fir or spruce. You are right that you need to predrill to avoid splits.


5

This looks like a crack caused by the wood drying and shrinking. Likely caused by dry winter air, although it's also possible that the wood wasn't properly dried before the bench was assembled. (Humidifying your whole house can help with cracks like this, but wood is a natural material and nothing will preserve it perfectly forever.) It also doesn't help ...


5

When I looked into this question in the past, I reached the same conclusion as JayL, plus one additional handy rule: If I can smell the finish at all, it is not completely cured yet. So when my thinned poly coats feel cured to the touch, I lean in and take a deep breath. Usually there will still be a faint whiff that lasts up to a couple more weeks.


5

The traditional answer for drilling larger holes would be a brace and bit.


5

You'll probably want to rent a proper floor sander. A small random-orbit will take ages and you'll probably burn through most of its useful life. The sander should come with a variety of paper grits. As with any woodworking project, start with the heaviest and transition to the finest. The final should be somewhere in the 100-120 grit range. More ...


5

If it's truly 3/8", then the glue-down hardwood is half the thickness of a traditional hardwood flooring material (example - 3/4" thick oak). This uses less volume of wood per square foot of floor, hence the lower cost. The boards may also be narrower, which makes them cheaper to produce (per sqft) than wider boards. The downsides of the thinner material ...


4

Clean out the loose or soft darkened area with a utility knife. Fill the hole with stainable wood filler that is close to the shade of the floor, such as this After it dries, if you need to color it to blend in, try one of these markers. If necessary, make it just barely darker than the surrounding wood. It will look like a small knot. The colors can ...


4

If the scratches are all in the finish rather than gouging the wood, then (depending on what finish is already there) a "screen and re-coat" pass might be another option. That approach just roughs and somewhat levels the surface of the existing finish, then lays down a fresh coat on top of it. Faster and cheaper, can yield good results if the floor's ...


4

I won't go as far as @MichaelKaras but I would never lay 7 inch planks on concrete unless the concrete was 20 feet up in the air in an apartment building. Since yours is ground level you need to have a flooring system installed before you can do wood again. Meaning insulation then plywood subfloor and then your wood floors - probably engineered. You are ...


4

When re-finishing wood floors with drum and edge sanders one of the last steps is to blend the two areas with a floor machine sander. The floor machine is set-up for 100 and 120 grit sanding disks. Sanding this way between the two zones will even them out and blend in appearance.


4

Yes, that's OSB. It's the only product that's made with large wood "strands". I wouldn't have guessed that it was 3/4" though due to the apparent lack of tongue and groove along the longitudinal edge, but maybe the photo is misleading. Particle board looks like compacted pine sawdust. Fiberboard (MDF) looks like pressed pulverized wheat chaff. Neither of ...


4

Wood gives, and takes.... In my opinion, wood will compress when needed. Picture a hammer striking a board and leaving a mark, it compresses. This is quite the exaggeration, but for a point. The wood in the center of your floor, held in place by all the other nails surrounding it will compress. Although I do not know how much area is "held tight" by this ...


4

From what you've told us, it sounds like you are trying a number of good ideas to help mitigate the smell and lingering off-gassing but maybe not optimally. I actually would advise against using bowls of water or vinegar and adding unnecessary moisture to the air. You actually want to remove moisture from the air (air conditioners //air dehumidifiers do ...


3

The underlayment being nailed down was the first mistake. Nails pull, wood slides against the metal, and it squeaks. Subflooring (all of it) should be screwed down (and glued, preferably). The bounce is probably a problem with the span of your floor compared to the thickness of your joists. Was the floor bouncy before the hardwood install?


3

Its rare that hardwood is installed without it being sealed with something. Varnishes being present will prevent you staining without sanding first. If you like the present color, you can topcoat it after a good cleaning and light hand sanding with 220grit sandpaper on a pole sander (if not worn, many times carpet is called in to avoid a refinishing).


3

I really doubt you can sand your floors. Some engineered floors can be but this is a very small percent. And this would be a diy because pros won't want to be responsible for the thin top layer sanding through. One of the things I have found with engineered hardwood is the clear coat varies drastically from different types. I have tested a lot and some ...


3

If you can get your hands on a file, you could modify a screw to be self-drilling. File a v notch along the tip of the screw so that one face scrapes wood out of the inside of the hole as the screw is driven. (like the tip of the screw in the picture) (image from this related question) If the notch is hard to file, you can do it on just one screw and reuse ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible