We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
28

There are a lot of factors when it comes to pricing flooring as it has become a highly competitive, mass produced commodity. What you have here is the cheapest specs you can get in wood flooring: 2" wide planks are about as narrow as it gets, it is a harder install 3/8" thickness is about as thin as it gets and will limit its application to something ...


17

According to FDA regulations, the typical clear wood finishes that dry to a hard film, including polyurethane, are considered food safe. Wait to use the surface until the finish is completely dried, and clean it before allowing food contact. Polyurethane is a fine choice to use on a counter, as long as you don't use the counter as a cutting board. If you ...


17

It's likely a knot that came loose. The circular grain around it sure makes it look that way. The wood can turn blackish like this if water gets in there and sits which could easily have happened with a small hole like that. How a Pin Knot is formed. Broken branch with encased dead twig, when the branch split under snow load, the twig slid through the ...


12

Solid wood flooring in a wet area is inherently risky due to the moisture everywhere. Pine flooring (a moisture-absorbent softwood) is inherently risky to install. Solid boards are inherently more prone to cupping than engineered boards. Gluing a wood floor to concrete is inherently risky because concrete is a big sponge that absorbs and releases moisture in ...


10

Surface finishes are notoriously difficult to get smooth when the process is interrupted. The glossier the finish, the harder to have sections blend. If you are talking about preliminary coats, especially if they will get a light sanding between coats, this is probably ok. For the finish coat, I would strive hard to do it all in one shot. If you simply ...


10

Your problem is obvious. Moisture is migrating up from the slab. I don't imagine anyone suggested to do a moisture check on the concrete before you started? There are meters that can measure the % of moisture in concrete. With that said, it is never a good idea to put wood or laminate directly on concrete slabs or uncured concrete upper floors. In your ...


8

The answer is "it depends" -- on what you need, on how well it's cared for, and how often you want to refinish it. Real wood is measured by something called the "Janka Hardness Scale" -- oak is a good choice, as it's rated at about 1300, with only more exotic woods being harder. I was told that Oak would probably be scratched by my dogs' claws, though, and ...


8

Often permanent markers can be removed with isopropyl alcohol. First, assuming you still have the markers, I'd try using this to remove it from a test surface. If it works, then try on the bottom of your table to ensure it does not damage the finish. If it is safe, then use it to try and remove the marker from your table.


8

@iLikeDirt covered a lot of important information, but I'd like to add something since the majority of the information assumes that there is a problem of excess moisture due to the concrete, while the expert assessment says it is actually dry cupping that is the problem. Dry cupping implies that the interior humidity is dropping below the average ...


8

If you have a traditional wood framed house, termites in the flooring would be the least of your problems. Structural issues due to termites in load bearing walls would be much worse. Are you on a slab or crawlspace? If you're on a crawlspace, you already have a wooden subfloor anyway. Do you have a current termite problem, or are they common in your area?...


7

I suspect the previous answer will rarely apply to the problem as reported by OP. Most likely the floor isn't "solid" hardwood (ie - it's probably not 2-3cm thick floorboards laid directly over joists that have sagged). I've often seen what OP describes on "click-lock" flooring, where interlocking 6-10mm thick panels are used to "tile" the area. The panels ...


6

Not doable at all. Old houses have 3/4'' thick wood planks as subfloor, not 8x4 sheets of plywood like today's houses, so I would say that it's ok to consider your hardwood floor the subfloor. That's if you're putting another wood floor on top. However, for the purpose of tiling you need an additional layer of plywood to reduce deflection that will cause ...


6

No you never silicone a toilet to the floor. If you do and have a leak, you won't be able too tell until it's too late. Then if you do have a leak and can't tell, there goes your floor.


6

It's also known as rosin paper: Its main purpose is to stop air leaking through cracks in the subfloor and floor which is especially important if the space below the floor is unconditioned. (You'll also find claims that it prevents the floor from squeaking or muffles sound transmission through the floor.)


6

Removing Dark Stains With Sandpaper Remove the finish over the stain gently with sandpaper, moving with the grain of the wood. Use #100-grit sandpaper, and then feather the edges with #150-grit sandpaper. Sand the stain with #150-grit sandpaper, now that you have removed the finish. Feather the edges around the stained area with #0000 steel ...


6

Oxalic acid, either in crystal form or as part of a pressure treated deck cleaner/brightner will chemically dissolve the stain. If you use the crystals, use all normal precautions for acids (eye, hand, clothing). You can sparingly apply with a small nylon artists brush. Try 5 min increments (5 on, wipe off, 10 on, wipe off) until the stain starts to ...


6

There is nothing wrong with putting engineered flooring on your slab in Florida. It can last a really long time and I have installed it in my own home on slab and helped with other homes. Buy a really good wood. Make sure that you really give it a scratch test. Get samples and whatever. I used to take pennies, screwdrivers, smack my wife heals, all ...


6

Wall to wall carpeting is usually attached to the floor using carpet tack strips around the perimeter like these The raised tack points grip the edges of the carpet. Once you pull up the carpet, there is probably a padding that is just laid on the floor without adhesive. If it is rubber backed, the rubber bottom surface sometimes sticks to the floor ...


6

Make a bow drill: Get a block of wood big enough to hold in your hand. Scrape out small hole in the wood. The non-pointy end of the drill bit goes in that hole. This is called the "hand hold". You're going to use this wood block to push the drill bit against the door. Make a bow with some strong wood and strong string. Wrap the string around the drill bit,...


6

For strength, hardwood is far preferable to softwood. Most big box stores have pieces of oak, often in the stair parts section. If nothing else is available, poplar would be preferable to softwood such as pine, fir or spruce. You are right that you need to predrill to avoid splits.


5

When I looked into this question in the past, I reached the same conclusion as JayL, plus one additional handy rule: If I can smell the finish at all, it is not completely cured yet. So when my thinned poly coats feel cured to the touch, I lean in and take a deep breath. Usually there will still be a faint whiff that lasts up to a couple more weeks.


5

If possible, try framing out the edges. I would remove all of the existing sub floor (since it is particle board) and then add addition framing along the edges as needed for the new plywood. In cases where you can't meet a joist, go perpindicular and create a nice foundation for the floor to attach too. I would make sure the floor has a firm foundation. ...


5

This looks like a crack caused by the wood drying and shrinking. Likely caused by dry winter air, although it's also possible that the wood wasn't properly dried before the bench was assembled. (Humidifying your whole house can help with cracks like this, but wood is a natural material and nothing will preserve it perfectly forever.) It also doesn't help ...


5

The traditional answer for drilling larger holes would be a brace and bit.


5

You'll probably want to rent a proper floor sander. A small random-orbit will take ages and you'll probably burn through most of its useful life. The sander should come with a variety of paper grits. As with any woodworking project, start with the heaviest and transition to the finest. The final should be somewhere in the 100-120 grit range. More ...


5

If it's truly 3/8", then the glue-down hardwood is half the thickness of a traditional hardwood flooring material (example - 3/4" thick oak). This uses less volume of wood per square foot of floor, hence the lower cost. The boards may also be narrower, which makes them cheaper to produce (per sqft) than wider boards. The downsides of the thinner material ...


4

I just tried "Goof Off" http://www.goofoffstainremover.com/ on the underside of my table and it worked very well. Of course the underside of my table is sealed with polyurethane. You might just want to leave it. This seems strange at first, but I resigned myself to it years ago. Now when I look at the child inflicted damage around my house I think of it ...


4

Take a look at strand bamboo. It is very hard, twice as hard as oak, and extremely resistant to scratches. We installed the Morning Star Strand Carbonized Bamboo in most of our house and have been very happy with it. In two years of daily living, the only scratches we've had are where my toddler was jabbing and scratching with a screwdriver. You will need ...


4

Clean out the loose or soft darkened area with a utility knife. Fill the hole with stainable wood filler that is close to the shade of the floor, such as this After it dries, if you need to color it to blend in, try one of these markers. If necessary, make it just barely darker than the surrounding wood. It will look like a small knot. The colors can ...


4

If the scratches are all in the finish rather than gouging the wood, then (depending on what finish is already there) a "screen and re-coat" pass might be another option. That approach just roughs and somewhat levels the surface of the existing finish, then lays down a fresh coat on top of it. Faster and cheaper, can yield good results if the floor's ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible