12

I have had some similar projects. On occasion, I have been able to force glue into a joint with a glue syringe and clamp the joints together. The key to this method is cleaning out the joint with a putty knife or something similar and clamping it tightly. The method that has been most tried and true for me is, unfortunately, a bit more involved. Those ...


11

The answer depends on what you are willing to accept for a finished result. Removing the quarter-round allows the edger to reach underneath what is visible when the quarter-round is re-installed. Even the most fastidious edging is going to be visible to close inspection if the trim isn't removed. The extent to which it is obvious depends largely on the ...


9

Is the joint still solid? That is, if you grab the two pieces on either side and shake them, is there any movement? If it's solid, then it means that the gap is just a result of shrinkage, and it's merely a cosmetic problem. Just slap some wood filler in there and sand it down. But if it's actually separating, then you'll have to re-glue it (see ...


7

I had two floors to do once and between coats I used a broom with 3 bits of fine sanding paper taped to the broom head - cheap, cheerful and effective... Also, had to punch down the floor brads (nails) so they were below the surface... Those floors came up magic but also vacuumed after sanding to remove the dust...


7

You could use a hand-held orbital- like you mentioned the biggest downside is time. But you're correct, sanding between coats of poly isn't stripping an old floor- it's just scuffing up the previous coat of poly in preparation for the next one. Even easier for this step though would probably be a pole sander- like the kind for drywall seams. Use a fine ...


6

Wall to wall carpeting is usually attached to the floor using carpet tack strips around the perimeter like these The raised tack points grip the edges of the carpet. Once you pull up the carpet, there is probably a padding that is just laid on the floor without adhesive. If it is rubber backed, the rubber bottom surface sometimes sticks to the floor ...


5

Depends on the quality of the existing finish... if it's as flat as you want it to be, then I'd kiss it with 150 on a pole sander. Link for illustration purposes only: there are many out there... If you need to knock down blobs/ runs/ etc, then start with 120 on the handheld random orbit sander. Work your way up to 150/220. Vacuum and then wipe with a ...


5

No. You really can't. There are several reasons why: Dust. Sanding dust will get everywhere. Ideally you want to move everything into one room, that will hopefully not be refinished, seal off the door and do everything at once. Equipment Rental. It is simply not cost effective to rent the sanders for multiple small periods of time. If you try and ...


4

If the scratches are all in the finish rather than gouging the wood, then (depending on what finish is already there) a "screen and re-coat" pass might be another option. That approach just roughs and somewhat levels the surface of the existing finish, then lays down a fresh coat on top of it. Faster and cheaper, can yield good results if the floor's ...


4

Sometimes it takes a village. Here's a summary of what ended up working: The first layer of tiling came off without too much trouble by using a heavy duty paint scraper (with a slight bend to it) and a hammer. I was able to get through this in less than an hour. The second layer was much harder. I believe @Ecnerwal was right in that it was actually a layer ...


4

If those refinished stair treads are a common type type of hardwood such as oak, maple or beech you can get 1/4 inch thick plywood with an hardwood veneer on one or both sides. Looks like one sheet of the material would be more than enough to to make your riser skins. Precut the pieces to fit without fastening right away. When you cut them you will want ...


4

It really depends on how tough you will be on the floors. Big difference between a man living alone vs. a family of 8 with two dogs. Note that the areas that are worn are probably the high traffic areas, so you will probably be hitting those the most too. The issue is that if there isn't any sort of protective layer, the wood will wear substantially ...


4

Having run into the exact same problem, I might be able to make a recommendation to assist you. There are many variations on this theme, but they are all based on the "cyclone" principle. Spinning air cannot hold particles as easily as "linear" flowing air. Physics (SCIENCE!) is your friend. One can build one's own cyclone vacuum assistant or purchase one. ...


4

There is a good possibility that the pine boards in a 130 year old house are very dense wood. Old growth timber from that time was quite different from what we experience as "pine" today. As such that type of wood is much less absorbent than even some types of hardwood that you may choose today. The dense wood leaves more of the stain material on the surface ...


4

I sanded a similar wood floor, a bit older though. I used a drum sander 8 or 10” in diameter and 14 or 16” long roughly. I sanded diagonal to the grain with coarse then finer grades of paper. It took about 5 passes in total with 2 at the medium paper. This produced a lot of dust and I sealed all the doors to prevent other rooms getting covered. Also had a ...


4

At least two very different meanings. One has nothing to do with how it looks - it's "tacky" meaning slightly sticky. For a finish, that's not fully cured/hardened. The other is tacky meaning that in the opinion of the observer it's in poor taste or style. That one is a moving target as things go in and out of style and tastes change or are simply ...


3

Its rare that hardwood is installed without it being sealed with something. Varnishes being present will prevent you staining without sanding first. If you like the present color, you can topcoat it after a good cleaning and light hand sanding with 220grit sandpaper on a pole sander (if not worn, many times carpet is called in to avoid a refinishing).


3

I am a firm believer in doing it right the first time. The most expensive part of this type of job is the urethane. Good quality oil based urethane can go $50 to $90 per gallon. you really need at least three coats to do the job properly, with a light sanding between coats. If you take the time to sand the floors now, get them in a good condition, balance ...


3

You have a few options: Don't put any more Brand B on. Go get more Brand A and finish the rest of the floor. After it has all cured, place a 5' x 7' area rug over the Brand B area. Continue with Brand B over the rest of the floor. Yes, it will look different than you originally expected, but at least it will seem like it is supposed to be that way. Who ...


3

Turn up the heat while opening windows across the house. Put in fans in windows/doors blowing in the house on one or two sides. Just don't put fans blowing in all windows so air has an easier chance of escaping. It would be better to open all windows partially than two windows fully. Definitely make sure you have at least one fan though to create a ...


3

NIOSH (National Institute Of Safety and Health) does not manufacture respirators or dust masks, they conduct research and make recommendations for prevention of worker injury/illness. If their name is on a respirator it means they approve of it's use for the manufacturer's stated purpose. Generally. you should wear a particulate mask or respirator when ...


3

A random-orbit sander has proven to be one of the most versatile tools I've used, having put hundreds of hours on them for projects of many types. Obviously they have limitations, but with a range of paper grit on hand they're invaluable. Note that this is not the same as a conventional "orbital" sander, which can be a dangerous and damaging instrument in ...


3

If you would like the floors to look nice pull the base boards and the tack strip. Rent a large belt sander from the local equipment rental store. Your floor doesn't look to be in two bad of shape and appears to have been oil finished so you may be able to use a less aggressive belts 220 maybe 400 grit. once the first pass is done start saving some of the ...


3

It is totally feasible to do this. Just a lot of hard work. We redid a laundry room that had a worn painted outdoor porch floor (the house is from 1869 and has been organically growing for 150 years). Tongue in groove. Fir, we think. We pulled up the boards carefully, removed the nails, hand scraped the edges, (which had been coated with paint and would ...


3

I would always suggest you avoid sanding sealers unless you have a specific reason to use one. Sanding sealers place a clear base coat between the wood and finish. But because the sealer is formulated to build fast and be easy to sand it can often be softer than the top coat which is problematic. The only advantage it would offer in your specific case is ...


3

That’s called character. I’d use a pre-stain (test it and the stain color in a back corner of a closet). I’d set and putty all exposed nails, you don’t have to be perfect. You’ll enjoy it for years. If you paint it you’ll have a “plastic” looking floor.


3

A "wipe on" polyurethane might get you most of the way there, depending upon how perfect you want to get it. Lightly sand the damaged area to make sure there are no sharp edges or rough spots. Then with a lint free cloth, wipe on some (it'll take a few coats) and see if you like it. If good enough, great, if not, and you really want it right, ...


3

Solid hardwood floors can be refinished several times. However, we don't know enough about your floor to answer properly. Some factors: How many times it's been done before. Eventually you start getting through to the tongue of the plank, which leaves thin spots and gaps. You might also start seeing nail heads. How severe the dark spot damage is. That might ...


2

In my experience, it will tend to make them look a bit better as opposed to worse. The polyurethane will obscure some of the scratches, diffuse some discolorations to make them less noticeable, and the added gloss will also make imperfections a little less visible. The flip side to this is that it will make it much more time consuming to do a full ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible