12

I have had some similar projects. On occasion, I have been able to force glue into a joint with a glue syringe and clamp the joints together. The key to this method is cleaning out the joint with a putty knife or something similar and clamping it tightly. The method that has been most tried and true for me is, unfortunately, a bit more involved. Those ...


11

The answer depends on what you are willing to accept for a finished result. Removing the quarter-round allows the edger to reach underneath what is visible when the quarter-round is re-installed. Even the most fastidious edging is going to be visible to close inspection if the trim isn't removed. The extent to which it is obvious depends largely on the ...


9

For this sort of residue, I highly recommend GooGone. Mineral spirits, and Naptha will work, but the fumes they give off are much worse. You should also do a test area first, in case the chemicals you're using causes problems with the original surface (removes it too, stains it, etc.) You might be able to speed things up with a hair dryer (not a heat gun, ...


9

Is the joint still solid? That is, if you grab the two pieces on either side and shake them, is there any movement? If it's solid, then it means that the gap is just a result of shrinkage, and it's merely a cosmetic problem. Just slap some wood filler in there and sand it down. But if it's actually separating, then you'll have to re-glue it (see ...


8

Often permanent markers can be removed with isopropyl alcohol. First, assuming you still have the markers, I'd try using this to remove it from a test surface. If it works, then try on the bottom of your table to ensure it does not damage the finish. If it is safe, then use it to try and remove the marker from your table.


7

(Bona fides: I sanded my house and a friends' about 10 years ago, and two rooms in my new house last year. I then went with a pro for the rest of the house — it's crappy work and not something I wanted to do again.) Drum sanders are the fastest but also take a deft hand and careful attention — they can dig a groove in the floor pretty quickly, ...


7

You'll need to start over, sanding out the splotches of glue. To deal with the divots of glue, they can be 'set' using a nail-set in the same manner that you'd set a nail ... or the divots of glue can be dug/scraped out ... or simply left as-is. You'll likely have similar splotches with store bought wood filler, and blotches can arise from other ...


7

I had two floors to do once and between coats I used a broom with 3 bits of fine sanding paper taped to the broom head - cheap, cheerful and effective... Also, had to punch down the floor brads (nails) so they were below the surface... Those floors came up magic but also vacuumed after sanding to remove the dust...


7

You could use a hand-held orbital- like you mentioned the biggest downside is time. But you're correct, sanding between coats of poly isn't stripping an old floor- it's just scuffing up the previous coat of poly in preparation for the next one. Even easier for this step though would probably be a pole sander- like the kind for drywall seams. Use a fine ...


6

Others have recommended actual products, but it is possible that those will leave stains on the surface after the fact. Have you considered/tried a steam cleaner? They are pretty good for tasks like that and they use only water so you have less of a mess left behind. I've used it to remove stickers from an array of surfaces and it works great every time. ...


6

While a heat gun can remove a large amount of paint, there will always be some residue that needs to be removed with scrapers and sanding. Scraping can mar and gouge wood (less an issue when you can fill and paint) and sanding in tight crevasses in molding is hard. There are commercial scrapers available, but they don't always fit your needs. On important ...


6

Wall to wall carpeting is usually attached to the floor using carpet tack strips around the perimeter like these The raised tack points grip the edges of the carpet. Once you pull up the carpet, there is probably a padding that is just laid on the floor without adhesive. If it is rubber backed, the rubber bottom surface sometimes sticks to the floor ...


5

Oils all pretty much set up the same way. They oxidize and form a polymer cross-link. Once this has happened, you have a vegetable plastic coating on everything they came in contact with and were absorbed into. It's non-reversible so after-the-fact cleaning isn't an option. Removing the oil while it's still liquid usually requires mineral spirits, ...


5

There could be a few different reasons for your situation. I would lean towards the theory that only one coat of finish, urethane or maybe varnish was applied to a poorly prepared surface. I'm afraid there is not quick fix to your problem. I would be looking at stripping and sanding the entire floor, clean away every spec of dust and refinish with at ...


5

Depends on the quality of the existing finish... if it's as flat as you want it to be, then I'd kiss it with 150 on a pole sander. Link for illustration purposes only: there are many out there... If you need to knock down blobs/ runs/ etc, then start with 120 on the handheld random orbit sander. Work your way up to 150/220. Vacuum and then wipe with a ...


5

No. You really can't. There are several reasons why: Dust. Sanding dust will get everywhere. Ideally you want to move everything into one room, that will hopefully not be refinished, seal off the door and do everything at once. Equipment Rental. It is simply not cost effective to rent the sanders for multiple small periods of time. If you try and ...


4

You could install a thin threshold between each room. That would cover the overlap in finish between the rooms. If the planks run parallel to the doors, you could cut out one board between the two rooms. That would give a clean line between finishes (and place the one board back at the end. All that said, you will save a TON in labor if you just do it all ...


4

I just tried "Goof Off" http://www.goofoffstainremover.com/ on the underside of my table and it worked very well. Of course the underside of my table is sealed with polyurethane. You might just want to leave it. This seems strange at first, but I resigned myself to it years ago. Now when I look at the child inflicted damage around my house I think of it ...


4

No you don't buy a new brush each time, you properly clean the brush after each use and it will last you for years! Water didn't work because.... remember school... water and oil don't mix? You need to clean your brush with mineral spirits, naptha or something similar. The product will tell you what to clean up with. –


4

It appears as if the finish is some type of penetrating stain and sealer. There may also be a worn topcoat, such as satin polyurethane, that has worn. SAND - As described in several comments, wood siding can be sanded to both remove scratches and even out the color. If you wish to stain the surface to restore the natural finish and even out the tone, it is ...


4

Sometimes it takes a village. Here's a summary of what ended up working: The first layer of tiling came off without too much trouble by using a heavy duty paint scraper (with a slight bend to it) and a hammer. I was able to get through this in less than an hour. The second layer was much harder. I believe @Ecnerwal was right in that it was actually a layer ...


4

If the scratches are all in the finish rather than gouging the wood, then (depending on what finish is already there) a "screen and re-coat" pass might be another option. That approach just roughs and somewhat levels the surface of the existing finish, then lays down a fresh coat on top of it. Faster and cheaper, can yield good results if the floor's ...


4

It really depends on how tough you will be on the floors. Big difference between a man living alone vs. a family of 8 with two dogs. Note that the areas that are worn are probably the high traffic areas, so you will probably be hitting those the most too. The issue is that if there isn't any sort of protective layer, the wood will wear substantially ...


4

Having run into the exact same problem, I might be able to make a recommendation to assist you. There are many variations on this theme, but they are all based on the "cyclone" principle. Spinning air cannot hold particles as easily as "linear" flowing air. Physics (SCIENCE!) is your friend. One can build one's own cyclone vacuum assistant or purchase one. ...


4

There is a good possibility that the pine boards in a 130 year old house are very dense wood. Old growth timber from that time was quite different from what we experience as "pine" today. As such that type of wood is much less absorbent than even some types of hardwood that you may choose today. The dense wood leaves more of the stain material on the surface ...


3

Unfortunately, I'll be surprised if you can effect a very successful repair. Restoring the outer corners like those is tricky at best. And having it stained only makes it worse, since the wood grain will be easily visible. Most likely any attempt to repair will make it worse looking not better. I'd opt for something low-impact, such as a scratch-cover ...


3

What you will want to do is to get a polyurethane stripper with brush, a pair of rubber gloves, a scraping tool, fine grit sandpaper (200), a clean cloth, and a well ventilated room. Start by applying the polyurethane stripper liberally and evenly over the wood using the brush. Let it stand for about 5 minutes or whatever the directions instruct you to do. ...


3

Just to build on what richardtallent said... 3/4 inch solid oak floors can handle 3 refinishes we were told. Beyond 3 and the wood is to thin. This is very very dirty work. the dust will get everywhere. When we did out first floor, we had just remodeled the kitchen. make sure you tape off any rooms you want to keep clean with heavy plastic and painters ...


3

I have had repairs done on oak floors that resulted in refinishing small areas. It looks remarkably good. The process is straightforward: sand the area, clean it with a solvent afterwards (denatured alcohol), apply polyurethane, let dry. Use solvent based polyurethane and get the same finish type (gloss, satin, etc.) and apply a few thick coats.


3

I refinished the floors in my house (built in 1940's and originally hardwood floors). At some time, carpet had been put over the top in all rooms. When I purchased the house, there was carpet in one room and the previous owner had ripped up the carpets in the other rooms and only used an ugly wood stain in their pathetic attempt to "refinish". I ripped ...


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