New answers tagged

2

You can certainly varnish a section or a spot. Far better than leaving it bare, if it is, where it will just get harder to fix while you wait - even if it does not match at all. Making it blend is more trouble, though some of that can be helped by "just using it" rather than worrying about about it when it's freshly redone and the rest of the floor isn't - ...


3

Alternate tread, riser, tread, riser, starting at the top. This allows the tread to set on the stringer with the most surface contact to the stringers, I use a minimal amount of adhesive to eliminate squeaks. Once the tread is in, the riser can be slid up to meet the bottom of the tread. Putting in all the risers first runs the risk of there being slight ...


1

I've found a couple articles that might be very helpful for anyone who see's this in the future. It's always good to know about acceptable moisture levels in wood before installing floors or working with any kind of wood. How long does it take to acclimate hardwood flooring? I know this is an old post but if anyone wants a great suggestion for a reliable ...


2

Staples or visible nails are not normal, except right next to the wall. The nails are normally nailed into the tongue and groove portions of the floor boards, which hides the nails. One option is to use a nail set, push the staples deeper, then cover them with nail filler, sand and finish. But since these are likely a hardwood, like oak, you risk making ...


4

No, that's not the normal way to fasten hardwood floors. Usually they are nailed or stapled on the edges which are then covered by the adjoining piece. I suspect there was a problem here and the flooring was raised up and rather than take it out and do it right, they just stapled it down and left it. Poor workmanship in my opinion.


Top 50 recent answers are included