New answers tagged

5

As one of the comments asks, what's wrong with the floor? It looks pretty good. If you're just wanting to add a new coat of finish, use a fine grit (120 or even higher) to scuff up the floor before laying down a new finish, otherwise it won't adhere properly.You might even be able to get away with a circular floor buffer with a scotchbrite pad (probably ...


1

As others have hinted or stated outright, sanding can make a floor look worse. I moved into a house where someone had done a poor job of sanding the living room floor and left it with a ripple effect. The floor you show looks perfectly fine to me. The somewhat used look has an antique effect that many people find charming and desirable. Unless there are lots ...


7

Try starting with the 100 grit and see what happens. You can always switch down to a coarser grit and continue, then return to the finer ones later. From your photos, looks like the wood itself is in decent shape and you're only needing to add some tooth, before adding another coat.


9

Start with the fine stuff, if it's too slow go for the coarser stuff. from the look in the photo 60 or 100 would probably be suatable for the first pass. Hire a drum sander for the middle of the floor and an edging sander to do the perimeter, Because the edging sander works across the grain you'll need to use a finer grit on that one perhaps 240. If you ...


23

I've only refinished two hardwood floors myself but I do know a bit about woodworking given my dozen years of experience as a cabinet maker. The first floor was done with a rental rotary sander. This violates one of the cardinal rules of wood sanding: always sand with the grain. A rotary sander will leave swirl marks and you'll have to spend a lot of time ...


18

I'd only consider 20 if you know you need to remove significant material--such as when dealing with deep scratches or stains. Otherwise I'd start with 60. If that doesn't work quickly enough on the varnish, move to 36 or 40 (from elsewhere, if necessary). The coarser you go the more you have to work to remove wood in the later stages. I'm not a pro. I've ...


4

It's difficult to say. I'd try the 20 on a small area and see how it works. It's often a fine line between too aggressive and too fine where too aggressive removes too much material and too fine clogs up too quickly with the floor finish. You may have to experiment some to determine what works best for your situation.


1

Given that a "standard wood shim" is a wood shingle that's too narrow to be a shingle - buy a pack of wooden shingles. If you want more (with the grain the other way) buy a clapboard or two. Or simply use a bunch of normal shims next to each other.


1

This strikes me as an XY question. Why not just slap a 6-foot scrap of lumber on the side of the joist, tight against the floor? No whittling necessary.


0

I've seen videos for jigs for cutting shims on a table saw. I'm sure you could find one that you like and use it to cut shims out of a wider board. Most 10" table saws have a depth of cut of about 3.25 - 3.5", so that should be 2 to 3 times as wide as store bought shims. You might also be able to adapt the jig for use on a band saw. That would ...


1

Larger shims I usually just cut to fit from plywood. The layers in the plywood allow you to change the depth pretty easy by chiseling and just lifting the layer up until you want it to end.


7

Generally, flooring is tongue & groove and nails are driven at an angle through the groove and into the subfloor/joist below. If the flooring is not T&G, then it would be face nailed. If you're not seeing nails from above, then the flooring is, most likely, T&G and nailed through the grooves. It's possible that it was glued down, but from the age ...


1

In all my 48 years of on working homes, whether it was building new or demoing old and renovating, I have never seen evidence of baseboards being removed for the sake of refinishing floors. The homes that I was overseeing the work in when it came to the refinishing, the base was taped so they were not damaged or smeared with stain, sanded right to the edge ...


0

I agree with @jwh20 and when I did my floor I removed them. The trick is to get a sharp box knife and score the top of the baseboard so when you pull it away from the wall, it doesn't pull the paper and or paint off along with it. Most equipment that gets that close to the baseboard would mare the surface and you'd have to touch up/repaint the baseboard. ...


1

If this were my floor, I'd remove the baseboard molding so that the floor could be refinished properly. Of course you can leave them in place but it will be impossible to get right to the edge with the refinishing equipment and the finishing products. What you might do is ask your supplier who does not want to remove the baseboards to provide some references ...


0

Upon further research, it was made clear that humidity/temperature need to be stabilized first, temperature excursion would damage a hardwood floor. After the temperature excursion is addressed through proper heating and cooling, the primary concern for expansion is against the walls, where a 1/2" perimeter is to be left for expansion. If the Drywall is ...


1

I would use solvent based poly for an industrial loft. I am partial to solvent based and have had friends that said they had good success with water based (I have not had as good results) so this a opinion, however the solvent based tends to hold up better or did in wear testing so for something more than residential I would go solvent based it drys better ...


2

Vermin would be my only concern. Spray foam is not the best sealer for the critters but staple some steel wool over the opening and put the spray foam on that. The foam encapsulates the steel wool using less foam and critters don’t like chewing on the steel wool (they will tunnel through spray foam very quickly). Those gaps look larger than I like but as ...


Top 50 recent answers are included