49

I would not mount the latch to the door skin. Even if you can attach it well, chances are you'll pull the skin off the door over time. It's not designed to withstand that sort of stress. Instead, use long bolts with acorn nuts to sandwich the two sides to the door, or use coupling nuts and bolts from both sides. The latter requires larger holes through the ...


32

In the Netherlands (and other parts of Europe) we use a 'patentbout' for this situation. The holes are through the entire door and line up with the shields.


26

Looks like a run-of-the-mill landscape stake to me. They're used for securing plastic edging, fabric, etc. Could also be a tent peg. It's a horse apiece. I'd give it a few taps with a hammer to loosen it, then try prying it out with a spade or the hammer with a block under it.


14

Most municipalities and counties maintain a central resource of buried utility line locations. Here in New England it's telephone 888-DIG-SAFE. In most of the U.S. you can start with telephone 811. They probably do not know exactly where the lines run onto your property, but they will tell you what to look for, and if that stake is one of theirs.


12

I wish comments would allow pictures, but what you have is something generically called a "push on fastener" I have to disagree with jsotola, I consider them "barely reusable", they often break when when removing, esp. if old. I wouldn't count on being able to re-use it. I attached a pic of something what I think is close to what you ...


9

It is called a shoulder bolt. You will probably need to try a specialized hardware supplier. In the US, Fastenal or McMaster-Carr come to mind as far as national outfits. With this type of hardware, it is sometimes so specialized to the item it came off of, it could be easier to just locate the manufacturer and model of the scooter. You could then first ...


8

I've typically just seen that called metal strapping or steel strapping. Home depot sells a similar thing in their ventilation accessories section, and they call it 'perforated metal hanger straps': https://www.homedepot.com/p/Master-Flow-Perforated-Metal-Hanger-Straps-3-4HS/100396917 Most metal strapping I've seen has straight sides, instead of wavy ones ...


5

Called things like locking clip ... But I get them off by preloading them with one small screwdriver then tweaking each of the locking tabs in turn with a second small screwdriver so it moves off.


5

If the handle on the front and the back have the same hole pattern, you could use 4 bolts and nuts to sandwich the handles to the door. If it is really completely hollow there, try reinforcing the thru-hole first so you're not just clamping two flimsy door faces. SolarMike had some good ideas for inserting that through the larger hole. Second, have you tried ...


4

I made a cedar hand rail and came up with a stand off to set it off of the posts by a couple of inches. I used a carriage bolt but you could do it with a lag bolt or machine bolt. Lag into house, washer, sleeve, washer, lumber with recessed/counter sink hole, washer, lag head. Edit: Since people are interested, here is another photo.


4

Well, I have used two solutions in this situation: open up the holes in the metal hinge as you suggest - quick and easy, I have, with time available and planning, filled the larger holes in the wood with pegs or matchsticks that are glued in. Once dry re-drill the pilot holes and works well.


4

It's part of an IKEA TYSSEDAL Bed frame. Part number 124401 Assembly Instructions Ikea will be the only place to find a part like this. According to Ikea: Sometimes things don't go as planned. If your order arrived incomplete, contained damaged products, or didn't even show up, we're here to help. Visit your closest store Email us Give us a call 1-888-888-...


4

Some door handles use a grubscrew to grab onto the spindle. With one of these on both sides the load on the fixing screws is reduced. Reinforcement: the goal is to get more thread length to bite. In some cases a plate of plywood on the inside of the door would be easy, here less so. Instead, you can reinforce each hole independently as follows: Drill an ...


3

This answer assumes your door is hollow. Firstly, inspect the hinge side of the door. Tap it to see how thick the hinge style is - if the door is not worth fixing then don't. One option is to replace the door completely, but that's expensive and its hard to find a door that matches your others. If you think the door is best repaired, then fill it. Remove ...


3

You're essentially creating an inverted shelf over your microwave. Just adhere to all the principles of mounting a shelf: Adequately strong brackets Anchors of appropriate size and depth Shelf material that's up to the task I would not use brackets of that type. They don't seem robust enough to me. Heavy gauge steel with a diagonal brace would be your best ...


2

It may be called a Chicago bolt, or a sex-bolt because the other end will be a matching bolt-shape but with a blind hole for the threaded part to mate into. If it were intended for a nut, then it would be called a shoulder bolt as per the other answer, but in this specific case its an axle for the scooter's wheel, so a nut is a mechanically bad choice. ...


2

I think your choice of 5/16" size lag screws, 2-1/2" long, is fine. I would say 3/8" is overkill but if you just like the look of the bigger fastener, it would be fine. I'd actually use something a little smaller, but longer - 1/4" size, and 3" long. (And washers, whatever size you use, I'd use washers.) One of those is adequate to ...


2

You might be able to find an appropriate clamp, but this appears to just be an irrigation shut-off key. They are not expensive brand new and I'd bet that the whole new key doesn't cost more than whatever speciality clamp you might ultimately find


2

Here's a picture of an antique doorknob assembly. As @PhilippNagel commented, these should screw off once you remove the setscrew. If it's not unscrewing, double-check the other doorknob and remove a setscrew from that one, then hold both knobs and unscrew. One of them should come off.


2

Graphite has long been a popular lock lubricant. The properties that make it a good choice are that it is dry so it won't attract dust, it can get into very small spaces and it is not affected by cold or heat. It used to be dissolved in alcohol brushed onto the pieces. when the alcohol evaporated it left the graphite in place. Now it is available in aerosols ...


2

Those fasteners are called cam locks or cam bolts. Here are photos of a cam lock nut and a cam lock bolt (or screw, or stud). Your photo shows quite a large gap, especially at the lower left. Cam lock fasteners are not intended to draw a joint closed; they really should only hold it snug after the pieces have been fully pressed together. Try rotating the ...


2

These are specialty brass screws used for lighting fixtures. Some of the larger home stores have a large selection of brass screws but your best bet would be to go to a commercial lighting supply store. The ones I've been in have a large selection of brass screws. Bring the lamp in with you.


2

Tricky situation. I think you're right that the microwave's weight is supposed to be supported mostly by the wall bracket at the bottom edge. A fair chunk of weight is supported by the upper screws at the front edge though -- especially when the door is open, and particularly so when the door is pulled open-and-down by a short adult or a child (even if ...


1

The manufactures technical term is "Internal Tooth Star Lock Washers" The teeth maintain a spring-type force to keep the nut in place while resisting any chance to rotate. It is best practice that if they are removed to replace with a new one.


1

Pipe grip tie is the term used by Simpson for PGT® Pipe Grip Ties® which are used to attach a wood fence to a metal pipe support.


1

This looks like a field retro fit. A larger clamp than was needed and a two bolt holes drilled in it to make it fit. I have never seen one like this before and I've put up a lot of pipe. There are many pipe clamps that have rubber bushings in them to keep them from hitting the walls.


1

The 50's called, they want their decor back....sorry, I couldn't help myself. Google: Adjustable Threaded Pole Leveling Foot


1

There was similar hardware on the garage doors of a similar age house I grew up in, but I don't see anything similar online. This modern replacement is called an "Overhead Door Stop": Looks like there are several sizes available, this image is from Buy Door Hardware Now. Rather than pulling a chain to close the door, you push the door open a bit ...


1

If you can't find a pre-made set, I'd imagine you could build one. Use a heavy duty wheel mount (i.e. get rid of the wheel) for the portion on the door. Find a piece of "C" channel for the piece on the door header. Cut a slot in it with a grinding wheel. Pick another, smaller piece of "C" channel for the slider between them. Cut a ...


1

Typical approach for modern screens/windows (as Jack has shown the very vintage approach) is that the screen has a frame (typically aluminum) that has springs on one side or two sides so it can be fitted into the slot by compressing the springs, and when released is held in the slot by spring pressure. The sill is "trackless" so it won't trap water ...


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