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0

I wouldn't use those screws since you have no way of knowing how they were installed. However, I would suggest you look into brick hanging clips (use Google to find them). These are made of metal and are designed to grip the bricks. No holes are required. You made need a number of them depending on the weight of your stuff. I have used them to hang pictures ...


0

You've done the right thing by spreading the load across 3 joists. They need to be tightened, so flush with the joists.


1

Amazing, I inherited the identical plate. Must be some interesting history behind them. Anyway I just drilled a couple small holes in it and used common frame hanging d-ring hardware. Cover the sheet metal screw heads with some appropriately colored nail polish, done.


15

It's a "fangs" style fastener- I use similar styles to hang junk in my cubicle. The teeth latch on to the foam board in my cubicle walls, or it could also be used to grab the foam backing of a picture frame. Found it on amazon by googling "Eye Fastener for Foam Board" Drytac Push/Pull Hinged Hanger


2

The hinged nature of the part makes me think that it may be part of a box latch of some type. The part shown may be designed to snap onto a plastic or metal part box lid. The working nature of the latch would be similar to this: Picture Source


3

Another idea is to attach two eye bolts of some kind to the joists on each side and suspend with some kind of strap between, but again not sure the hardware I should use to do that. These solutions work but be careful and do the math: People naively think that if there are two straps then 50% of the weight is held by each strap, but the amount of tension ...


7

Just get a couple of joist hangers and add a 2x6 between your joists. Drill a small hole in the ceiling where you want the eye bolt first and poke a wire hanger through to help locate it from above.


19

I vote for the solution of providing blocking in the attic but will suggest a technique which is very much easier to install than some of the other answers here. A side on looking picture will get the idea across quickly. First trip to the attic to access the situation should include making measurements for spacing between the ceiling joists and the ...


1

My suggested solution is hidden blocking in the ceiling. From below, put a small hole where you want to connection so that from above you can locate where to place the block. In the attic, install a 2x4 (about 22-1/2" long) between the trusses, centered over the hole you made, and tight to the ceiling dry wall. Screw through the trusses into the ends of the ...


19

You've hit on three viable options. I'll make some notes on each so you can decide. Run a cleat across the gap Requires perhaps the most damage to the finished ceiling, but simple and fairly easy A 2x6 laid flat against the ceiling will carry the weight just fine (avoid boards with large knots) Four 3-1/2" by 3/8" lag screws, properly piloted into the ...


3

Easiest is probably to attach a piece of wood to the surface of the ceiling screwed into the joists with structural screws. 2x4 would be fine here as the load is only about 80kg Even painted to match the room that's not going to look particularly good best would be to put 2x4 blocking between the joists and attach to that. that's going to be messy ...


1

Structural engineer here. The beam is almost surely not stressed to it's limit. I'm not sure where you are at, that is, if you are in a snow area, but roofs are designed for loads that don't happen all the time such as snow, water, construction, etc. Also, wood as a material has the ability to resist higher short term loads. For a beam that size, I would ...


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There are several issues: The existing beam appears to be a solid beam. (You can see several gouges out of the bottom edge.) The beam appears to be stressed to its maximum limits. (You can see gaps between the ceiling boards in the second picture, which indicates the beam and ceiling is bending excessively. This may be seasonal...like when there’s a heavy ...


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