7

With the limited space on the right side. Here's a couple ideas that may help you. Buy or build yourself a pair of stair posts. If you choose to purchase, they come in all sorts of different sizes and designs. Example Build a half wall or full wall on both sides. Lots of ideas bouncing around the Internet. Be creative.


6

If your house will always be occupied by sedate adults and slow seniors, then you should install newel posts or stub half-walls (per Doc306). But if you have teenagers, or children who will become teenagers, then such half-measures will not survive. Teenage humans move quickly and will use any available handholds to change direction quickly. Posts and half-...


5

A cardboard or soft aluminium (from a drink can) shim sounds like an excellent solution to the problem. You want it just thick enough that the screws into the handrail cause the loop to grip tightly when they are done up.


5

Yes, that is a Type 1 handrail and is legal if: 1) it’s at least 1 1/4” in diameter and not more than 2”, 2) if it’s not circular, (which yours is not) it must have a perimeter of at least 4” and not more than 6 1/4” and a cross section dimension of 2 1/4”. (See ICC R311.7.7.1) Type 2 handrails are larger (like made from 2x6 trim) but must have finger grips....


4

Although it is a nuisance to remove all those banisters, it might be feasible to add a similar number of them. Install new banisters between the old ones, but extending upward 25% to 50% longer. Connect their tops with a railing similar to the existing one. In this picture, I haven't yet installed the new top railing, but you get the idea. The banister ...


4

Maybe, but it is not a good choice. Like Kris' comment said, this is made for the top of spindles. It will look funny IMO. You may need to notch the inside to accommodate the wall bracket (depends on the exact wall bracket that you use. Since the vertical dimension is fairly thin, it will be less rigid than expected. You could compensate by using more ...


4

The hand rail you chose will work with practically any handrail wall brackets on the market, if you choose to use that type. Do a search online for "handrail wall brackets" You will see the part that attaches to the handrail is basically the same on every style bracket. The plow or plough is for a fillet piece that is cut between the square top balusters ...


3

Have you thought if it do you like the idea of adding a industrial looking pipe hand rail? (I think black would look great).You could do a 6” or so version of the kind of mounting seen in this bunk bed railing All these fittings are easily found. Be sure to use a pipe diameter that is code approved I think 1-1/4


3

The Code requires the stair width to be 36” ABOVE the handrail and 27” width at the handrails and lower. (See IRC R311.7.1) Only one handrail is required. (See IRC R311.7.8) (In commercial projects, a center handrail is required every 88” width of stair, except at historic structures.) Also, handrails are required when you have 4 or more RISERS. (See IRC ...


3

Stair hand rails are primarily supported at the top and bottom by the newel posts. While some additional support is needed in a span over 5 or 6 feet, the handrail does not need dozens of braces. You will often see an inside wall handrail with attachments that are several feet apart. The spindles are primarily intended for safety, to prevent someone from ...


3

There is also this type of saw that may work ok for this job: This type has a lot more control than a larger reciprocating saw because the base rests on the surface of the decking board. These do have disadvantages in that when cutting thicker materials the blade can wander from straight down and create a cut that is not square with the surface. This can be ...


3

What are the common methods for this type of job? The one you described, plus:


3

I solved the same problem by with t-nuts. Embed the t-nuts into the stud, or in my case a wooden brace between the studs. Then attach the bracket to the t-nut with a machine bolt. I've screwed and unscrewed the bolt repeatedly but because it is metal-to-metal it does not compromise the wood and thus does not wobble. (I agree this question is different ...


2

Yes, you should add rebar across the joint between to old and new block wall. Do this by using a masonry drill (preferably a hammer drill) and drill 3-6" vertically down into the existing block wall top where the hole / rebar dowel will not be in the way of adding the next row of block. Best to use 1/2" or #4 rebar for this purpose and use the same size ...


2

If the door can be opened, it must have a landing on the outside, minimally 36"X36", but in your case, it must be the width of the doors X 36" deep from the house. You can put a guard rail in front of the inactive one, then have a smaller landing. That will look a little odd in my opinion though.


2

I am inclined to agree with Jack in the initial comments here that the bracket shown is what not going to ever be able to constrain the post to no movement. At best the depth of engagement of the post into the bracket is about two inches and the total length of the post is probably about 36 to 40 inches. Think of the size of lever arm at play here. It is ...


2

No, one handrail is required on stairs with 4 or more RISERS. (R311.7.7.) it needs to have a minimum of 1 1/2" clear from the handrail to the wall and shall be mounted not less than 30" nor more than 38" above the nosing of the tread. (R311.7.7.1.) The handrail shall be continuous, but it can be interrupted by newel posts at turns. (R311.7.7.2.) The size ...


2

That could be as simple as gas pipe surrounding a good sized lag bolt... If it was me, I'd counterbore the pipe about 1/2" into the post and rail to stiffen it up.


2

Stairs are to be at a minimum of 36" wide. If you place the rail in the middle, that surely would not meet code. I have to check, but code may require you to put a handrail on either side as it is. The old code only required handrails and guard rails on decks and stairs over 30", so you may not even need that. Of course, there is no reason you cannot add ...


2

You could install new balusters in between the existing ones to reduce the gap to modern standards. These new ones could extend 6 inches and support an upper rail, which could be a bit smaller than the lower rail to leave a 3-1/2" vertical gap and still meet code there as well. Or just replace half the existing balusters with longer ones and add an upper ...


2

There may not be any vertical studs (apart from at each end). It could just be a bottom plate and a top plate, to essentially form a rectangular frame which the cladding fixed onto top and bottom. To be honest, 3/4 timber is pretty strong if it's just the one, top bracket going there. Just make sure you use a heavy gauge screw and one which has threads ...


2

Residential stair handrails that are circular (like rope) need to be minimum 1 1/4" diameter; is that 1 1/4" rope? Residential stair handrails are supposed to be not less than 34" from the tread, and not more than 38". So if that rope has enough slack to be raised or lowered beyond those limitations... no good.


2

The ICC R311.7.8 of the 2017 (current) Code requires the handrail to be no less than 1 1/4” diameter and no greater than 2” diameter. It is to be installed no less than 30” above the nosing of the stair and no greater than 38”. It shall be on one side minimum and have a minimum of 1 1/2” between it and the wall. Handrails can be interrupted at newel posts ...


1

If you can find these self tapping metal bits, they will do the trick. They are a lot more robust then they look. I couldn't find the gauge of the post but worse case scenario you could mount a block to the post using two self trappers and go through the railing mount with a third self trapper. simply google from a google search The list of nobility is ...


1

My first thought was adding a layer to the top rail using pocket screws, but your text suggests a different approach to the final result. You've suggested that you can't get a hanger bolt, but Fastenal has them in at least a ten inch length overall. Zinc finish (yucky) but it's an example of a product that does exist. The twelve inch version is less ...


1

Well the first thing you could try would be to get your socket wrench and take that hardware fitting apart to see how it is made. Perhaps you could take it to a hardware store and ask for a match. If you don't want to do that then try this. First, measure the outside diameter of that metal shaft. Then buy a piece of pipe and three washers whose outside ...


1

It looks like your "theme" is those 1x elements - 1x6 top rail, and maybe 1x3 or 1x4 lower rails. I'd suggest you gen up a 1x3 or 1x4 hand rail, with another at a right angle to provide stiffness. (That is, create an "ell" shape, with a smooth top surface horizontally, and another board mounted vertically below one edge.) This would be a great place to use ...


1

You could try drilling holes in the vertical member for the set screws to engage. Remove the setscrews and drill a hole that is smaller than the set screw shaft that the end of the set screw will engage. You need not drill a hole all the way through--just make a pocket for the end of the screw to fit in. Right now the screw is contacting the corner of the ...


1

You'll probably have to get a Carpenter or even a Stair Builder to fix your problems once & permanently. You can try the underside of the handrails for the solutions here How do I tighten/loosen this recessed nut and bolt? But, that will only fix the loose handrails & maybe the spindles. If the Newel Posts at the ends of the handrails are loose, ...


1

I would suggest turpentine and 0000 steel wool, alternating with paper towel first. If not clean enough, Proceed to the ammonia treatment described by 0A0D. The oil step also sounded good.


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