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11

It's a monkey wrench, if you can believe that, or a coach wrench. Adjustable coach wrenches for the odd-sized nuts of wagon wheels were manufactured in England and exported to North America in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. They were set either by sliding a wedge, or later by twisting the handle, which turned a screw, narrowing or ...


9

#1026 - Side Cutting Pliers - 3/8" Jaw Width Sargent seems to still sell something like these, called Side Cutting Pliers. They also have a variant without the cutter, called parallel action pliers.


4

It is just pressure fit onto the axle. Take a pair of pliers or vise grips and get good grip on the nut, gently pull and twist at the same time, back and forth back and forth. It may take some time to get it off.


3

Doesn't really matter what they're called. They're almost certainly proprietary and shown in an exploded parts diagram somewhere with a number next to them. You won't find them in hardware stores (real or online). You'll need to get in touch with the manufacturer one way or another, or you'll need to fabricate something that performs the same function ...


2

It's a floor jack height extender. Wow! I really love all the comments. The ones I'm actually familiar with had knurling on the sides instead of the black, looks like abrasive, coating shown on this one. They came in three different sizes and the set included a jack with a hole in the lifting plate that one end of the height increaser would fit into and a ...


2

I assembled toys, displays, and bicycles for a major retailer for 7 years. I despise removing those caps in a recessed hole like the center of a plastic wheel. You can snap the plastic cover off, then use vice grips, pliers, a screw driver, or wire cutters to twist, bend, pry, or cut the metal part to remove it. They're almost always destroyed during ...


2

The Makita XMT series of tools is marketed toward tradespeople and professionals while the DMT is for the mass market. Little outward differences but generally there are significant differences in durability and reliability. You'll find DMT at big box stores and the like. Usually you'll only find XMT at professional supply outlets. If you are just going ...


1

Thanks to Ed Beal, I looked at the name on the tool. That also led me to take a scouring pad to the blade itself and lo and behold it's a Cartonax 45


1

My grandfather had an ancient toolbox with a broken hasp. He attached the ends of an old belt to it with grommets (iirc). The buckle connected to the box, the holed end to the lid. I bet you can figure out how it closed...


1

To get the last jaw screw out try this: choose a short quarter-inch hex bit to match the jaw screw. Place the hex bit into a quarter-inch box-end wrench and close the vise jaws so the bit is trapped and pressing against the stuck screw. Use the box wrench as a handle to turn the bit and loosen the screw. Adjust the vise tension to prevent the bit from ...


1

Firstly because while it is obviously discouraged sometimes there is no real choice but to work live. Obviously a bunch of precuations should be taken in such cases and such work should only be attempted by suitablly competent people but sometimes it has to be done. Secondly because shit happens and real electrical installations are full of horrible bodges. ...


1

Insulated screwdrivers work in protection, at least my Klein screwdrivers have. The point is to just not take the risk if you don't know what you're doing. A while back, I wasn't paying attention to where my insulated screwdriver was, moved it to the side, and arc'd out on the old school metal one gang boxes. Didn't shock me through the insulated part of the ...


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