15

Okay my curiosity was piqued. I am an average 60 something year old guy who turns a wrench for a living. I clamped my old school Beam Type Torque Wrench in a vise. Using a 1/2" square x 3/8 drive drive socket on the torque wrench and an 8" ratchet I hit 70 ft-lbs. This was just a straight steady pull. I did not test to see how long I could hold that number....


10

I can't say for every stapler, but this works for all the ones I've used; While in the Open position, pull the lever handle backwards. This will disengage it from the spring mechanism, and you can then lower the handle and use the storage loop to hold it in place. When you subsequently release the loop, the handle will engage itself on the spring.


8

Torque is simply the amount of force you apply (lbs) multiplied by the distance from the thing you're rotating (ft), hence the unit "ft-lbs" (foot pounds). If you apply 50 lbs of force 6 inches (.5ft) away from the bolt head, then you're applying 25ft-lb of torque. The same 50lbs applied at the end of a 2ft wrench would give 100ft-lb of torque.


6

For speakers, losing a couple of strands of the wire itself is irrelevant. I know that some of the wire mfrs hawk their "gold plated" wire and make a huge deal about conductivity, but in reality it's all bunk. 16ga wire is rated for 10A, even a typical 350W speaker is going to draw maybe 6 to 7A.


6

You're not going to be able to reasonably cut the square out with your hand saw. You'd have to scrape through the wood instead of cutting it. Pick up or rent a coping saw and a hand drill (See saw below). Drill a hole in the four corners, remove the blade from the saw and run it through a hole, hook it back up and saw away.


5

If you can apply upwards force using your leg muscles to supply the force and just hanging on with your arms you can probably put three times your weight on it so 450 pounds on an 8" handle is 300 foot-pounds. if your're a weightlifter or other athlete probably much more. (you'll probably break the handle and skin your knuckles) If torque is important use ...


5

The internal threaded part made by the tap needs to be slightly larger than the external threaded part made by the die (else it would not screw in). As a result of this requirement the tap will be larger than the die and won't fit inside.


5

I can't confirm that this is the way is "should" be done, but... I've had a similar staple gun in my garage for about 28 years. I almost always put the lever catch on (lever down), and I still have to squeeze pretty darn hard to fire a staple and it still sinks them all the way on every fire (unless, of course, I'm not holding the stapler firmly ...


4

It could be used for any of the following, depending on size: A Schrader valve core tool, used for automotive tires (see examples) A wing-nut tool, useful in tight places or to apply more force A wire-wrap tool, if there is a recess at the end of the shaft A tool for hand-bending metal contacts or light wire


4

Greenlee 1161 Adjustable Fiber Jacket Stripper (source) I used to use these until I learned how to just do it with a utility knife. If the jacket is loose enough, you can try these. "Slitting blade [not visible in picture; it's inside] rips outer jacket of NM cable cleanly and quickly" IDEAL Lil' Ripper Wire Strippers (source) I've owned "The best wire ...


4

Being stingy, and not averse to minor personal injury I'd attack the white outer with my trusty pocket knife, The idea is to cut it most of the way through the white layer and then flex the cable until it tears the rest of the way though. Cutting while flexing works well too.


4

Storing the mag base "off" is equivalent to storing it "on" attached to a thick ferrous item - "off" is "magnetically attached to itself internally." Either is fine. This serves the same function as a "keeper" bar for a plain permanent magnet. A thin surface (sheet metal) is not as good, and "on" but not attached to anything risks weakening the magnet over ...


4

I think you may be talking about a slick: This is what Wikipedia has to say: A slick is a large chisel, characterized by a wide (2-4 inches, 5–10 cm), heavy blade, and a long, frequently slender, socketed handle. The combined blade and handle can reach two feet (60 cm) in length. The blade of a slick is slightly curved lengthwise, and/or the handle socket ...


4

Leave the lever up. In the lever up position the main spring is relaxed. As you press the lever down the spring is progressively tensioned until it is triggered to drive the staple. If the lever would be restrained then, then the main spring would not be under tension. But if you would restrain the lever before release is triggered, then the main spring ...


3

I have a few different staple guns - I don't think any have that handle lock. One has a metal loop that hooks up to hold the hand down. I think this is more to keep it in a smaller shape then prevent it from being used. It wouldn't make sense to have to remove the staples just to lock the handle. From the image I'd just pull the handle down to what ...


3

You asked, Does anyone know the name of this tool? That tool is called a scorp. Specifically, that scorp looks like it is designed for block print carving, the act of cutting an image out of a block of wood or a thick piece of leather to be used in printmaking. Scorps are different from gouges or other carving tools in that they're meant to be drawn (...


3

It depends how long the "cheater" is. With a 3 foot cheater pipe over the handle ,it will be a LOT of torque. For my 3/8 drive , 1/2" thinwall conduit is a perfect fit over the handle so I have about a 10" length in my tool box. Large box wrenches ( like 2") in industry only have about a 12" stub handle , the user supplies what ever length pipe he wants for ...


3

They don't in my experience. However, that is not a litmus test of a tap and die. The litmus test is whether threads they cut will mesh.


2

It looks like a broken breaker bar with the end ground down for some specialty job. They are manufactured by many companies but here's a similar piece about the same size or it could be a larger one cut down.


2

I have a similar one and if you look at the square drive side there is a retaining ring which holds the ratchet mechanism in place. Take care when prising the ring out - I use a small bladed screwdriver.


2

The Makita XMT series of tools is marketed toward tradespeople and professionals while the DMT is for the mass market. Little outward differences but generally there are significant differences in durability and reliability. You'll find DMT at big box stores and the like. Usually you'll only find XMT at professional supply outlets. If you are just going ...


2

With experience, you can just cut the outer insulation (trick being, not all the way though - you make a weak spot/stress concentration by grooving it, and then pull off the waste, and it breaks where it's been grooved.) You can practice by cutting off less of the outer sheath than you need a few times, so any nicks on the inner insulation would be stripped ...


2

I would use a clevis pin like the image, with a bit of hex shaft welded into it for the chuck to grip. Remove the safety clip and withdraw the clevis pin to allow the jack eye-hole to pass into the jaw, then push the pin through and secure with the safety clip. A spacer to reduce the play between the clevis pin diameter and the jack eye-hole diameter will ...


2

I have had one for 45 years and have used it a lot. It was part of a screwdriver/socket set I got from my little sister for Christmas. The screwdriver bits are not as effective because you can't put your weight behind it and the bits have a tendency to turn out of the screw in some cramped places. It works very good with the sockets because the torque is ...


2

Bolt cutters come in many sizes, you may need to shop around to find some that can cut 10mm, simple mechanical bolt cutters for cutting 10mm steel will have handles about a metre long. Hydraulic cutters are more compact and are operated by pumping the handle several times. each stroke closes the jaws slightly. hydraulic cutters with jaws intended for ...


2

I did something similar to this in my younger years when I needed a board cut with a 45 degree angle. I marked the cut line on the edges and face of the board. Then positioned the saw to the cut line and clamped furring strips on the top and bottom of the board up against the positioned saw the length of the cut. the two furring strips acted as a double ...


2

Well, first off, because the hammer is utterly the wrong shape, it won't work very well - and you can substitute "at all" for "very well" without being very off the mark, especially since you are evidently new to this and don't understand it much at all. Peening a scythe properly is a process that takes some tools and some skill. With certain tools, more ...


2

So one thing professional toolmakers have a lot of is toolchests - storing delicate instruments safely takes space... Many look out for those custom old wood toolchests and even refurb them. Others buy them or make them, but those expensive small tools need looking after.


2

With the new photos added we can see you're working with a regular 1/2 inch coupler on the end of a piece of pipe. Both are probably "black" iron pipe (as opposed to being galvanized pipe). I suggest removing and replacing the coupler. That'll probably be easier than cleaning out the internal threads. You'll need a pair of pipe wrenches, and heating the ...


2

This, unfortunately, is a common and difficult problem. The issue is corrosion between the Aluminum and Steel and it can make it difficult and sometimes impossible to separate them. Here is an article from Sheldon Brown that describes some causes, prevention, and fixes: Sheldon Brown Seatpost Article I suggestion trying #9 to start with.


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