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91

The idea is to not rely on any single point of failure. For you to be planted six feet under, you want at least three things to have gone badly wrong at the same time. Your lockout padlock fell off. Someone didn't realise you were working on the circuit and switched the breaker back on. You forgot to turn off the isolator switch. You didn't notice the ...


65

A de-energized circuit is like an unloaded gun Once I worked on a circuit. I shut off the breaker (I knew the circuit well, since it powered the lighting in the electrical parts crib) and double checked power was off. As a a third check, I brushed the now-dead hot wire against EMT ground. Was expecting nothing or possibly a huge, sunburn-making arc flash....


46

Yes! the tool is called a caulk gun. Use the spout cutter for cutting off the tip of the tube; then use the seal punch tool for poking holes in the foil seal.


34

The top tools appear to be dies - used for cutting screw threads on rods. The lower tool appears to be a tap wrench (a tap is a tool a little like a drill bit, but used for cutting threads inside a hole). The "winding and unwinding" action is to allow it to clamp to the tap; the wrench is then used to turn the tap in the hole. The dies would also have had ...


18

I would caution against using any bolt cutters on the toilet hold down bolts. The reason being that they typically will apply a significant pressure against the porcelain base of the stool and crack or break it. Another thing to consider is that bolt cutters typically have a jaw profile as shown below. With this type of arrangement it is just not possible ...


17

Bolt cutters are not really the best tool for cutting off rusted closet bolts. I usually use a "mini-hack" saw:


17

Not all insulated screwdrivers are the same Those that are UL® tested up to 1000V and also conform to IEC 60900:2012, ASTM F1505-10 & NFPA 70E standards, are specifically designed and intended for working on live applications 1000V or less.


14

You may have some luck with a screw extractor. They come in various styles - here are two of them: The extractors are designed to screw themselves down into the head of the screw while at the same time applying torque on the screw in the direction that would loosen the screw. Your described screw had a hex socket type hole so the extractor may be ready to ...


14

That is a set of punches. There are pin punches (the straight flat tipped ones), for popping out roll pins and the like. Center punches (the pointy ones) for marking a point in metal where to start a drill and to keep the drill bit from wandering. Looks like two nail sets (the tapered flat pointed ones) for setting nails below the surface in wood. And ...


14

Those are rivets (specifically pop-rivets), they are a permanent fastener not intended to be easily or routinely disassembled and reassembled. There are many ways to remove them Drill You can drill them out with a HSS drill bit of appropriate diameter for the stem of the rivet. Once you have drilled out the centre, the heads will fall out. Punch You may ...


13

That's from Best of Wordless Workshop by Ray Doty; the original was a monthly column in Popular Science. (Published sometime between 1971-1985) The retail versions probably make more sense, but you can hum the theme from the A-Team while exterminating with this one. Besides, Wordless Workshop was a great feature.


11

There are a mix of tools, #1, 8, 9 and 12 are center punches for marking metal prior to drilling. #2, (bent) 5, 6, 10 and 11 are drifts for driving pins, compression pins, door hinge pins too. #3 and 4 could be nail sets for driving finish nails below the surface of wood, but I cannot see the tip which should be "cupped" if they are a good set. #7 is a ...


11

It's a monkey wrench, if you can believe that, or a coach wrench. Adjustable coach wrenches for the odd-sized nuts of wagon wheels were manufactured in England and exported to North America in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. They were set either by sliding a wedge, or later by twisting the handle, which turned a screw, narrowing or ...


10

Part of your comments actually answer part of your question. First let me point out NEC 100 "Definitions" and the term Qualified Person. That's one who has the skill and the training ... to recognize and avoid the hazards involved. So as an admitted amature you need to make doubly sure any work you do does not involve you working on an energized circuit. ...


9

The most likely solution is to create a template and use a router with a bit that follows the template. The router would also be used for easing over any sharp edges. photo credit, sample image, not a product recommendation


9

#1026 - Side Cutting Pliers - 3/8" Jaw Width Sargent seems to still sell something like these, called Side Cutting Pliers. They also have a variant without the cutter, called parallel action pliers.


8

I usually just cut a slot in the screw head with a Dremel or similar rotary cuttter, and then use a regular screwdriver to unscrew.


7

It's a long wooden bar, about 5' long, about 2" round at the top, tapering larger to about 6"x2" oval at the bottom, with (usually) steel wheels, and a steel "lever" at the bottom. Kind of like the design of a hand-truck. It's used for moving or shifting heavy items. I agree, images are impossible to find. Edit: Found one: Search for "Pry Bar Lever ...


7

If the head is readily accessible you can use a fine toothed metal saw to cut a groove with which you then can use a regular flat screwdriver to unscrew.


6

Looks like the tool used to clip animal nails. Even looks like it has a handy depth gauge, so you don't hit the vein in a dogs nail. Professional Pet Nail Clipper


6

I always drill. Works like a charm, rivet's metal is quite soft. On the third picture, rivet et gone already, you should be able to push it out.


6

It's not an engineering or practical issue, it's a legal issue. Let's say this "insulated" screwdriver's packaging could be read to imply that it's OK for a user to stick it into a live breaker panel. And now, let's say Joe Bozo buys one, enthusiastically sticks it into a live breaker panel, and (perhaps due to his own negligence) gets electrocuted. It's ...


6

Wrong. At some point, any insulation will break down and either begin to conduct or simply flash over. From Wikipedia: Electrical breakdown or dielectric breakdown is when current flows through an electrical insulator when the voltage applied across it exceeds the breakdown voltage. This results in the insulator becoming electrically conductive. ...


5

Hex shank to square drive adapter This bit is a hex shank to square drive adapter, which allows you to use square drive bits with a drill/driver. Hex shank socket The second set of tools is hard to tell for sure what it is. If the sliver bit at the bottom has a hexagonal cutout in it, then they are hex shank sockets. If that's what they are, they allow ...


5

Pull it straight out the opposite way it went in. The retaining ring is a spring steel circle of round wire that is split on one side. The diameter of the circle is very slightly smaller than the distance around the points of the 1/4" hex bit: The ring is inserted so that it floats inside of a groove around the inside end of the driver tool socket. When a ...


5

The plane iron may also be ground slight differently in shape (as opposed to angle)... but yes, those are the largest differences. They do affect how the plane is used. A longer plane improves its ability to accurately flatten a surface (it can level out wider-spaced hills and valleys where a shorter plane would just follow the curves). But depending on ...


5

A hand powered drill will be satisfactory for drilling small holes in plastic pipe or even in wood. It will not be so good for drilling holes in concrete, glass bottles or metal items. The problem with the latter is that you will spend so much time drilling the holes that you are likely to get discouraged and never arrive at the point that you can determine ...


5

Tool Belt Tool Bucket Tool Box Tool Chest Tool Cabinet Tool Truck


5

Congratulations on becoming a home owner. You will soon learn to use lots of tools if you plan to do any DIY projects around the house. Most locksets only require a #2 Phillips screwdriver. You should not need any special or expensive tools. Just read the directions and follow them. Changing locks is very simple, usually just two screws that hold the inner ...


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