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80

This is a common mistake, which will lead to premature roof wear. What the installer should have done, was to install an A to B transition elbow, and continued down the roof with a section of down spout. Then used an A elbow to have the water dump directly into the lower gutter. It should end up similar to this Allowing the high volume of water to flow ...


14

Since the dormer extends out past the main roof, some (looks like about half) of the water would fall to the ground below. This could cause problems with drainage, puddling, erosion, and possibly lead to water infiltration. The gutter should be there, but there should be a downspout running from the outlet to the lower gutter (as described in this answer). ...


13

If you use PVC gutter stock, it needs to be solvent welded at all the joints. Don't bother with any of the clip-together DIY grade junk that's out there. Having tried two different manufacturers, here's the basic results on the clip-together stuff: Vinyl's high expansion rate means that it grows mightily when hot and then contracts in cold weather, ...


13

This is caused by: poor roof design poor gutter installation Since it's not cheap to fix the roof, the solution is to fix the gutters. You simply need larger and/or repositioned gutters. The catch is if you also have heavy snow loads. In that case, you also need strong, well-installed gutters. :) In this case, since it's really only one spot, I'd probably ...


11

It's hard to say from that photo, but it looks like that bulge is the stump of a limb that could be trimmed back further. Really that's a question for an arborist, though. If you do so you'll want to pick the right time of year to help prevent fungal infection. I agree that you're probably misinterpreting your city's ordinance, though. No sane city ...


10

How about Magnetic Christmas Lights? I've never tried them, but if they use a descent magnet it would be a winner. I've seen these before a Walmart or places like that. It looks like it would clip onto your shingles. They might be good for the short term of Christmas but I don't know how sun, wind and weather will affect their life.


9

I have cleaned gutters at multiple one-story houses by kneeling down from the roof, but I wouldn't risk it on a two-story house. If you have a two-story house or are wary of cleaning the gutters from a one-story roof, then you have two options: As BMitch has said, get a stabilizer bar (~$25-75; I recommend this one as it is easy to adjust and has no nuts ...


9

Could you turn the end of the downspout 45-90 degrees so the water exits across the roof slope, rather than down it? This would help distribute the downspout flow across more roof area. Not sure if that's a standard approach, but it seems quick and easy to try, and easy to undo if it doesn't work


8

Your gutter is overflowing because either the gutter itself is clogged up with debris or the down spouts are clogged up. Your larger sized gutter should be able to handle more rain than the smaller sized items installed on your neighbor's houses. So a smaller size would be even less able to cope with the problem than the size that you have. I suggest ...


8

Were it me, I'd consider a 'janky' looking roof much better than premature shingle failure due to overload. Run a section of downspout across your roof and dump it into the existing gutter, angled in the direction of flow, so that the water doesn't splash into the gutter at a 90 degree angle, but joins water already headed for the downspout.


7

I use small vinyl-coated cup hooks. I screwed them my first xmas in this house 10 years ago and have never had a problem with them. Just hook the lights on every year. Easy up-easy down.


7

This would be a situation where you'll have to use gutter straps (usually in T or K style): Image credit to acehardware.com They install on the roof decking - make sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions, as you'll be penetrating the singles. Image credit to www.heritagehillweb.org


6

3-5 centimeters is in the 2-3 inch range. Any more and you run the risk of water running off the tile and overshooting the gutter. The gap can vary some because the gutters must slope towards the downspout. Edit post comments: When you install your new gutters, put the point furthest from the downspout at the highest possible point against the bottom of ...


6

I agree with mmathis' comment that the ideal solution is to present the issue to the city to deal with the tree. The tree will only continue to be more intrusive. That being said, if you have to deal with the tree as is, the best solution would be to shorten the gutter by either cutting it and installing a new end cap or replacing that section of gutter ...


6

Size the gutters for the rainfall, but go with the largest downspout that will fit your gutters. The issue for downspouts isn't water capacity in a torrential rain, it's debris that gets washed into the downspout. The larger the downspout, the better debris will wash through. Large downspouts are harder to clog, pass more water when they do clog, and ...


5

You will need: 1 - Rivets or screws. I would recommend rivets for aluminum gutter 2 - An outlet for the new downspout, if you can't reuse the old one 3 - A piece of metal slightly bigger than the width of your downspout 4 - Aviation snips, if you currently don't own any 5 - Gutter sealer or solder bars 6 - A new downspout, if needed 7 - As tester101 ...


5

Carefully raise the lowest shingles on the roof line. Slip an additional shingle in under those shingles - install them oriented so the normally top edge of the shingle is the bottom edge (but make sure they stay face up). Nail in place as high up as you can close to the layer of shingles above, leaving a 1" over hang over the gutter to create a new drip ...


5

Is the water running down the roof not going into the gutter, and instead flowing behind the gutter? If so, then there is a problem with the gutter and/or flashing installation. In addition to the drip flashing, you should check that the gutters are properly affixed. They should be sloped toward the downspouts, but are they securely attached to the fascia ...


5

I use the all-in-one clips from here - http://goo.gl/ldASe After the first season of use they can become brittle and break, I usually have to replace a few of them every year but they are the best I've used. This is my house.


5

Would Velcro Christmas light hooks work? I used them one year (not this exact brand though) to good effect.


5

Sounds like either the gutters aren't secured tight enough, or you don't have a drip-edge flashing between the roof and gutter. The drip edge deflects water out and away from the house trim and into the gutter. You install it under the shingles, pulled out slightly from the trim, and secured with roofing cement.


5

From an industrial safety point of view, none of the above. A work platform (staging, or a manlift) is the proper thing to work from. Ladders should only be used to get to one, (and for certain designs two ladders can serve as a support for one) not as a work platform. Admittedly few homeowners go this way, but if you want to know what's "right" from a ...


5

Here's a VERY simple solution. I've had this problem for over a year and it's been driving me crazy. I finally found an incredibly simple solution, and it's especially good because I'm in an apartment where I'm not supposed to be "fixing" anything anyway. Take a scrap piece of wood and wedge it between the building and the pipe at or slightly above the ...


5

I found a pretty good way of stopping the noise. I cut some 5 mm thick rubber to the same width of the gutter then slid it in so it went just past the angle. It has poured down and they still run freely. So I hope this works for you.


4

Stick a sponge at the bottom the drips will land quietly on it and when it pours the water still flows through.


4

If I understand your issue correctly, what you're calling a french drain may actually more properly be called a drywell. A french drain pulls in groundwater and moves it somewhere else, while a drywell is a place to get rid of water underground. I think what you're talking about is something to pipe your downspouts into, and therefore I'd call it a drywell. ...


4

It is possible that your ice & water shield will peel up cleanly depending on age, climate, current temperature, sun exposure, etc. Try that first, otherwise... Installing drip edge under the two layers of shingle that should be present will take care of 99% of the water flow. The small amount that may come down during ice dam conditions may run under ...


4

You don't need gutters. However, you will want to move water away from the home, as well as reduce any damaging effects of the water dropping from the roof. Reduce damage from water When it rains, all the water that lands on the roof will be shed off the edge of the roof. This can be quite a bit of water, even with a small roof. If the water falls on a ...


4

A rain barrel with weep holes drilled in the bottom could provide a buffer to catch sudden rain flows and let the water trickle out over time. It could be above or below ground, though if above ground you could have trouble with it freezing before the water all drains out. Above ground wouldn't be terribly attractive; below ground sounds like too much ...


4

If you want to repair the leaking pipe where it enters the foundation, I'd use hydraulic cement to seal it. As for the downspout into the cast iron pipe, there are transition pieces that should tie them together more cleanly and tightly - or you could fashion something from ABS or PVC sewer pipe/fittings and downspout fittings. Otherwise, my thought on this ...


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