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87

This is a common mistake, which will lead to premature roof wear. What the installer should have done, was to install an A to B transition elbow, and continued down the roof with a section of down spout. Then used an A elbow to have the water dump directly into the lower gutter. It should end up similar to this Allowing the high volume of water to flow ...


15

Leaning the ladder against the gutter If the gutters are safe to lean on, and if there are no potential problems with denting them, then that is the way to do it. The ladder will be stable and you will be in a better position for cleaning the gutters than if you were on a ladder leaning on the walls. Some gutters are actually strong enough that you can ...


14

Since the dormer extends out past the main roof, some (looks like about half) of the water would fall to the ground below. This could cause problems with drainage, puddling, erosion, and possibly lead to water infiltration. The gutter should be there, but there should be a downspout running from the outlet to the lower gutter (as described in this answer). ...


13

If you use PVC gutter stock, it needs to be solvent welded at all the joints. Don't bother with any of the clip-together DIY grade junk that's out there. Having tried two different manufacturers, here's the basic results on the clip-together stuff: Vinyl's high expansion rate means that it grows mightily when hot and then contracts in cold weather, ...


13

This is caused by: poor roof design poor gutter installation Since it's not cheap to fix the roof, the solution is to fix the gutters. You simply need larger and/or repositioned gutters. The catch is if you also have heavy snow loads. In that case, you also need strong, well-installed gutters. :) In this case, since it's really only one spot, I'd probably ...


11

It's hard to say from that photo, but it looks like that bulge is the stump of a limb that could be trimmed back further. Really that's a question for an arborist, though. If you do so you'll want to pick the right time of year to help prevent fungal infection. I agree that you're probably misinterpreting your city's ordinance, though. No sane city ...


9

Could you turn the end of the downspout 45-90 degrees so the water exits across the roof slope, rather than down it? This would help distribute the downspout flow across more roof area. Not sure if that's a standard approach, but it seems quick and easy to try, and easy to undo if it doesn't work


8

Your gutter is overflowing because either the gutter itself is clogged up with debris or the down spouts are clogged up. Your larger sized gutter should be able to handle more rain than the smaller sized items installed on your neighbor's houses. So a smaller size would be even less able to cope with the problem than the size that you have. I suggest ...


8

Were it me, I'd consider a 'janky' looking roof much better than premature shingle failure due to overload. Run a section of downspout across your roof and dump it into the existing gutter, angled in the direction of flow, so that the water doesn't splash into the gutter at a 90 degree angle, but joins water already headed for the downspout.


7

This would be a situation where you'll have to use gutter straps (usually in T or K style): Image credit to acehardware.com They install on the roof decking - make sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions, as you'll be penetrating the singles. Image credit to www.heritagehillweb.org


7

The ladder should be placed against the gutter and extended (3' or so) above it, so you can do your work without reaching up blindly. Doing the work as you suggest could cause you to have an unstable body position, reaching up and over like that. If you are concerned about damaging the gutter, you could fasten a wide softner of some sort to the ladder. If ...


7

Sometimes the stars align and answers are provided. After i posted my comment this morning I was watching a previous episode of This old house in which they are restoring a New England Victorian house that is regulated by the local historic commission. One of the requirements needed to be met was the restoration of the Yankee Gutters. A web search led me ...


6

From an industrial safety point of view, none of the above. A work platform (staging, or a manlift) is the proper thing to work from. Ladders should only be used to get to one, (and for certain designs two ladders can serve as a support for one) not as a work platform. Admittedly few homeowners go this way, but if you want to know what's "right" from a ...


6

I agree with mmathis' comment that the ideal solution is to present the issue to the city to deal with the tree. The tree will only continue to be more intrusive. That being said, if you have to deal with the tree as is, the best solution would be to shorten the gutter by either cutting it and installing a new end cap or replacing that section of gutter ...


6

Size the gutters for the rainfall, but go with the largest downspout that will fit your gutters. The issue for downspouts isn't water capacity in a torrential rain, it's debris that gets washed into the downspout. The larger the downspout, the better debris will wash through. Large downspouts are harder to clog, pass more water when they do clog, and ...


6

I'm a gutter installer from florida,the sand shifts alot here under ladders,plus uneven ground and bushes to consider.I find a good spot on side of house or a lower roof to access top with another ladder.As long as your roof is a 6-12 pitch anyone can walk it,much faster,efficient and safer in my opinion .stabilizers throw off your balance and are difficult ...


6

TBH, it would probably be pretty difficult to lift the edge of the shingles enough to actually be able to nail the drip edge down from above. The shingles should be nailed pretty close to the fascia to prevent them from lifting in the wind, so (IMHO) you're doing pretty good that they were able to slip the drip edge under there to begin with. Personally, ...


5

You will need: 1 - Rivets or screws. I would recommend rivets for aluminum gutter 2 - An outlet for the new downspout, if you can't reuse the old one 3 - A piece of metal slightly bigger than the width of your downspout 4 - Aviation snips, if you currently don't own any 5 - Gutter sealer or solder bars 6 - A new downspout, if needed 7 - As tester101 ...


5

Stick a sponge at the bottom the drips will land quietly on it and when it pours the water still flows through.


5

I'd say it has guttering… but perhaps nowhere to go. The moulding round the top edge certainly looks gutter-shaped, it has sealed corners, all very 'guttery'. What it doesn't seem to have is a fall-pipe, so it will either just fill up if those gutter-ends are sealed, or pee down onto the paving if they're not. It also seems designed that the rear face is ...


4

Remove spike and replace with gutter screws. They're about 7 inches long and larger diameter than the existing nail hole. Reuse the tube the nail went through or use a new tube supplied with the gutter screws. If the hole in the facia is too large just drive the screw slightly above or below the existing nail hole into solid wood.


4

If I understand your issue correctly, what you're calling a french drain may actually more properly be called a drywell. A french drain pulls in groundwater and moves it somewhere else, while a drywell is a place to get rid of water underground. I think what you're talking about is something to pipe your downspouts into, and therefore I'd call it a drywell. ...


4

It is possible that your ice & water shield will peel up cleanly depending on age, climate, current temperature, sun exposure, etc. Try that first, otherwise... Installing drip edge under the two layers of shingle that should be present will take care of 99% of the water flow. The small amount that may come down during ice dam conditions may run under ...


4

You don't need gutters. However, you will want to move water away from the home, as well as reduce any damaging effects of the water dropping from the roof. Reduce damage from water When it rains, all the water that lands on the roof will be shed off the edge of the roof. This can be quite a bit of water, even with a small roof. If the water falls on a roof ...


4

A rain barrel with weep holes drilled in the bottom could provide a buffer to catch sudden rain flows and let the water trickle out over time. It could be above or below ground, though if above ground you could have trouble with it freezing before the water all drains out. Above ground wouldn't be terribly attractive; below ground sounds like too much ...


4

If you want to repair the leaking pipe where it enters the foundation, I'd use hydraulic cement to seal it. As for the downspout into the cast iron pipe, there are transition pieces that should tie them together more cleanly and tightly - or you could fashion something from ABS or PVC sewer pipe/fittings and downspout fittings. Otherwise, my thought on this ...


4

This is a common problem when gutters are installed at a later date after the roof and drip edge are finished. Ideally, the shingles would be extended over to the gutter but that wasn't done here in anticipation of future gutters. One solution is to run some caulking between the top edge of the cutter and the drip edge. Another solution, and a better one ...


3

Start at the highest point with the back of the gutter as high as it will go (up against the bottom of the slate or tile or galvanised iron roof). Slope the gutter down form there towards the spout. If the run is long, you may need flashing to cover the exposed part of the facia. Water will blow in there, and rot the timber facia. Flashing will start from ...


3

I am a contractor specializing in snow control systems. Shirlock homes is correct in most of what he was explaining. If the cables are not installed correctly then you will have wasted your time and money on the project. I have seen heat cable projects put together by "professionals", as they call themselves, and the heat cable created more problems than ...


3

I don't have enough rep to comment, so in the form of an answer: I fully agree with Tester101. You need to protect the lower roof from a large flow of water in a narrow space and incorporate the elbow at the end to bring it into the gutter. I have a copper tile roof and did something similar to protect it. The differences in my approach were: I used an ...


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