27

Grounding is no longer red-alert essential Since there are other ways now to provide better protection. Particularly, GFCI protection is so good that you're allowed to fit 3-prong outlets as long as they are protected by a GFCI device (somewhere in the circuit). So all these are acceptable: A socket that's obviously a GFCI, with "Test" and "...


15

There are a few possibilities: The bathroom outlets were changed to three-prong and the ground screws are unattached. This means they're not grounded and are potentially unsafe. New wiring (or retrofit grounds) were run to the bathroom. This means they're grounded and relatively safe (they should still be GFCI protected). The outlets in the bathroom have &...


9

TL;DR Unless there is a major panel replacement needed, you're looking at hundreds to replace every receptacle and/or add GFCI protection, not thousands. The electrical code (NEC) and actual practice have evolved over many years. Ungrounded receptacles are not ideal, but are not inherently unsafe. If they were, then there would be no such thing as devices ...


5

Safety grounds all get joined. Period. There's nothing that fancy about grounds, you simply glom all grounds together. This is never a mistake, and you should do grounds first before you do anything else. It's important to connect grounds first. If you do that, and the device trips the breaker, it's obviously a fault in the device. Whereas if you hook ...


5

Connect the white wire from the ceiling to the white wire on the lamp. Secure it with a wire nut sized for two conductors. Connect the black wire from the ceiling to the black wire on the lamp. Secure it with a wire nut sized for two conductors. Connect all the other wires to the green screw on the mounting plate. Use a pigtail construction with a wire nut ...


4

The equipment grounding conductors can join together in the gutter... The overall thrust of your plan, where you bring a bunch of branch circuits into a gutter then send their hots and neutrals to the panel via a short conduit nipple, falls under NEC 250.122(C): (C) Multiple Circuits. Where a single equipment grounding conductor is run with multiple ...


3

This isn't an issue because you're dealing with an EGC As it turns out, while using a stranded wire would have pulled more easily, you are in the clear with regards to your solid 8AWG copper equipment grounding conductor Code-wise. This is because NEC 310.106(C) (i.e. where your NEC 310.3 cite moved to in newer NEC editions) yields to other parts of the ...


3

Nope. Get the ground wire outta there! (out of the neutral splice). There should be a ground wire from the bottom of the switch hooked on a green ground screw and tied to the ground(s) in the box, nutted with a green nut. The neutral splice should only consist of neutral wires and the ground wires should all be tied together with a green nut. Wire colors can'...


2

You need to pull a ground to any path greater than 6'. The 1987 NEC in 250-91(b)ex.1 allowed FMC with the 6' restriction. The gfci on the feeder or on a branch circuit doesn't buy any indulgences for improperly installed circuits.


2

Whether or not you are "grandfathered" it is really foolish to leave a garage door opener on an ungrounded circuit or weakly grounded circuit. (which is what FMC is - it's a weak ground) People have been killed by something going wrong with their ungrounded garage door opener, they get a ladder out to climb up and take a look at it, touch the unit ...


2

Bottom line, all grounds need to be connected together. Assuming non-metallic box I mount the plate, pull the ground snug through the box, loop it around the ground screw leaving as much wire on the cut end of ground for a wirenut as possible. Then use a wire connector to connect bare and green from fixture to the ground from box. If using wirenuts a yellow ...


2

The ground is in no way connected with a 2 wire GFCI setup to convert to 3 wire. The GFCI doesn’t use ground itself but it can use it for grounding the yoke if available. Code allows a separate ground wire to be pulled so if you are really concerned about having things grounded this is a possibility


2

If the box is grounded by the conduit, you can get self tapping grounding screws and screw one into the hole in the back of the box. Then wrap your ground from your NM cable around the grounding screw and tighten. Use the proper NM to box connector. Make sure you're not in an area that requires conduit. In my humble opinion, the wiring shown in the lower box ...


1

Properly assembled metal conduit is an approved grounding conductor. If the conduit feeding the garage from the house is metallic and connected to the box at the garage, to which the conduits are attached, it's grounded. If there's a proper 4-wire feed (or 3 wires and metallic conduit) the neutral at the garage should be isolated (visibly insulated from the ...


1

(NB: I'm not an electrician, just a homeowner who has done some electrical work) Related: Does a non grounded GFCI meet code? It is 'perfectly acceptable' in that it is compliant with code (as long as it is properly labeled, as you state). A GFCI if wired correctly should trip if there is a difference between the current coming in and the current going out (...


1

Having all those ground wires is common because many junction boxes are nonmetal. I'm assuming yours is. The actual ground should be the bare copper ground coming into the box with the feed. Connect that ground to the green wire attached to the box. Now the box is grounded so any brackets you attach to the box and fixtures will be grounded when assembled. I ...


1

ALWAYS hook up safety ground first. Nothing is wrong with ground. Ground is a safety net. Ground catches faults. That's what it does. The problem is that if your device DOES have a fault, hooking up ground LAST causes you to observe a condition where the device works (but it is dangerous because it's faulting and it's not grounded, but you don't know that). ...


1

Follow the Instructions The instructions say: For metal junction boxes, it is required to connect the green ground wire from the transformer to the metal junction box or clamp it to the metal conduit. If it doesn't work when connected properly then either you have something very strange going on in your panel or the device is defective. The fact that the ...


1

You'll need to pull a 4th wire or throw a transformer at this to fix this up due to the parallel path The bad news is that this is a "fix now" situation, not a "fix eventually", because that copper water pipe creates a parallel path for neutral current to flow on, via the water pipe bonds and N-G bonds at each end. You could insert a ...


1

You have a 5th option if no grounding path is available and you want to update. Current code allows for a separate grounding conductor to be added to be compliant with 4 wire feed (if not metal conduit approved for use as such). And a 6th option, install a GFCI breaker or receptacle at the first device in each branch circuit. This is the same option that ...


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